• Animated Infographics for the Eat Local, Eat Real Campaign

    Posted to Infographics

    I love food. I love infographics. Put them together, and this is what you get. As part of the Eat Local, Eat Real campaign, this infographic video (below), produced by Sons and Daughters and Crush of Toronto, argues why we should eat local.
     Continue Reading 

  • Suicides by Location on the Golden Gate Bridge

    Posted to Infographics

    This graphic from SF Gate is a good four years old, well before I knew what an infographic was, but just because it's old doesn't mean it's not interesting. Here we see San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and the "sad tally" of 1,218 known suicides by location. Each black square represents a person who has taken his or her life and 128 light poles are used as reference points.

    The east side of the bridge, where most of the suicides occurred, has a pedestrian walkway. The first suicide was just 10 weeks after the bridge opened in 1937.

    [Thanks, Justin]

  • Gauge Your Distraction While You Text and Drive in the Distracted Driving Game

    Posted to Infographics

    From Gabriel Dance, Tom Jackson, and Aaron Pilhofer of the New York Times is this game to gauge your distraction while you're texting on the road. Yes. It's fun AND educational. Here's how it works.

    You're in a car with a driver's point of view. You're driving on a freeway or road with a ridiculous number of gates. There are six of them, and as you approach the gates, one will open, and you have select that open gate by pressing the right number. After a few seconds of practice, you'll receive a text message on the screen that asks a question. You have to reply while still selecting the correct gates as they pass.
     Continue Reading 

  • Friday Freebies: 5 E-book Copies of Beginning Python Visualization

    Posted to Contests

    Beginning Python VisualizationIt's Friday! I don't know about you, but I'm ready for the weekend, and what better way to start with some free stuff? I have five free e-book copies of Beginning Python Visualization to give away.

    I reviewed this book last month, and I thought it was really useful. In fact, I still have it in arm's reach on my desk.

    How to Win a Copy

    As usual, I'll make this really easy. All you have to do is leave a comment below telling me why I should give you a copy. Make up a reason if you like. I could use a good laugh. Do this by 11:59pm EST today (Friday, July 24), and I'll select five random winners. Good luck!

  • Three Ingredients to Make the Perfect Business

    Thanks to Jessica Hagy and her Indexed project, we've seen lots of graphs and venn diagrams to communicate ideas outside of data. Some are bad and others are good. Here's one of the good ones. Bud Caddell shows what it takes to make the perfect business, or more generally, just about everyone's dream - to get paid for what you're good at and love to do. Get the poster version of the graphic here.

    [via dataviz]

  • Death and Taxes Poster 2010 – 50% Off for FlowingData Readers

    Posted to Infographics

    Jess Bachman of WallStats just released his annual Death and Taxes Poster for 2010. For those unfamiliar, the poster is a graphical breakdown of the United States federal budget.
     Continue Reading 

  • IT Dashboard and Data from USAspending.gov

    Posted to Data Sources

    Taking another step towards data transparency, the US government provides the IT dashboard via USAspending.gov:

    The IT Dashboard provides the public with an online window into the details of Federal information technology investments and provides users with the ability to track the progress of investments over time. The IT Dashboard displays data received from agency reports to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), including general information on over 7,000 Federal IT investments and detailed data for nearly 800 of those investments that agencies classify as "major." The performance data used to track the 800 major IT investments is based on milestone information displayed in agency reports to OMB called "Exhibit 300s." Agency CIOs are responsible for evaluating and updating select data on a monthly basis, which is accomplished through interfaces provided on the website.

    Along with a page to filter and download spending data, there's a variety of views into the IT spending data that all provide a pretty good level of interaction.
     Continue Reading 

  • Comparing the Human and Chimpanzee Genomes

    Posted to Infographics

    As part of the Explore Evolution exhibit at the University of Nebraska State Museum, Judy Diamond displays a segment of the human genome in line with that of the chimpanzee that matches very closely. The point is to show how similar two are with the few differences represented by a drawing of a man, distinguished geneticist Svante Paabo.
     Continue Reading 

  • Thanks to Our FlowingData Sponsors

    Posted to Sponsors

    A big thank you to our FlowingData sponsors who help keep the servers running. Without them, FlowingData would be way too slow for consumption or I would be an even poorer graduate student.

    Please do check out their sites to see the useful visualization tools they have to offer.

    Freakalytics — Get Tableau Training- live, hands-on by author of "Rapid Graphs." Registration is opening up across the country.

    NetCharts — Build business dashboards that turn data into actionable information with dynamic charts and graphs.

    Tableau Software — Data exploration and visual analytics for understanding databases and spreadsheets that makes data analysis easy and fun.

    IDV Solutions — Create interactive, map-based, enterprise mashups in SharePoint.

    InstantAtlas — Enables information analysts to create interactive maps to improve data visualization and enhance communication.

    Want to sponsor FlowingData, your most favorite blog in the whole wide world? Email me, and I'll get back to you with the details.

  • From the FlowingData Forums [July 3-17]

    Posted to Forums

    Visualize This: Obesity Rates by State

    obesity mapThis segment of Visualize This is all about obesity rates in America. The data comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    In 2008, every state in the US, except for one had an obesity rate greater than 20%. In 1994, there were zero. Here is the data for 2008. You can find data from 1985 to 2008 from the CDC site. Share your visualizations in this forum thread.

    Thanks to all those who participated in the last Visualize This with Rambo kill counts. A little bit of Tableau, some R, and dare I say, Powerpoint. Be sure to check those out in the forums.

    Interesting Threads

  • If Aliens Were Tuning Into Our Television Frequencies…

    Posted to Miscellaneous

    In a different take on a timeline of television, Abstruse Goose, a web comic, shows us what aliens would be watching if they were able to tune into our television frequencies light years away. It doubly serves as a reminder of how old you are.

    [Thanks, Patrick]

  • Taking a Closer Look at Airplane-Bird Collisions

    Posted to Data Sources

    While we're on the subject of flight, ever since that plane landed in the Hudson River a few months ago, the thought of bird-airplane collisions haven't strayed too far from the media (or my mind each time I fly). In light of all the hoopla, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) finally gave in and opened up their bird strike database to the public.

    Below is an interactive exploring this data breaking things down by bird type, location, phase of flight, and time of day. Click through to this post to view.
     Continue Reading 

  • Why Are Cheap Airlines So Cheap?

    Posted to Infographics

    5W Graphics, whose work you've seen by now, compares lower-cost airlines to "regular" airlines. The infographic is from the Spain group, so the focus is on Eurpoean airlines. Apparently the concept of low fair airlines (LFAs) is fairly new in Europe, only starting in 1990 with Ryanair while Southwest Airlines was founded in 1970. I'm more of a JetBlue guy myself. I cherish my legroom and in-flight entertainment.

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • Collect Data About Yourself with Twitter – your.flowingdata is Live

    your.flowingdata (YFD), a Twitter application that lets you collect data about yourself, is now LIVE!

    I feel like I've been working on this project forever, but it's finally at a place where I think it's ready for human consumption. And unlike the previous version, what you track is completely up to you.
     Continue Reading 

  • How Does the Average Consumer Spend His Money?

    Posted to Infographics

    Add another graphic to the list of ways to show consumer spending. Visual Economics displays data from the most recent spending survey (April 2009) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare this to last year's survey results via an NYT interactive.

    The biggest difference I'm seeing is that between last year's spending on housing (42%) and this year (34%). Maybe that's why my mother-in-law keeps telling me it's a good time to buy a house. Do you notice anything interesting?

  • Explore World Data with Factbook eXplorer from OECD

    The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) makes a lot of world indicators available (e.g. world population and birth rate). Much of it goes unnoticed, because most people just see a bunch of numbers. However, the Factbook eXplorer from the OECD, in collaboration with the National Center for Visual Analytics, is a visualization tool that helps you see and explore the data.

    Those who have seen Hans Rosling's Gapminder presentations - and I imagine most of us have - will recognize the style with a play button and a motion graph in sync with parallel coordinates and a map. Choose an indicator, or several of them, press play, and watch the visualization move through time.

    Also, if you've got your own data, you can load that too, which is certainly a nice touch.

    [via BBC News | Thanks, Lawrie & Liam]

  • Religious Teachings On Sex

    Posted to Infographics

    This graphic on religious teachings and sex is making the social media rounds. The source is questionable and the design is a little iffy, but oh what the heck, it's Friday. Have a nice weekend all.

    [Thanks, Brian]

  • Health Care Costs Vary Widely By Region

    Posted to Mapping

    No, this isn't a bad fungus spreading northwest towards Washington. This map from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (via MSNBC) shows health care costs across the country, and yes, you are included Hawaii and Alaska.

    As you can see health care costs are from uniform country-wide.

    However, the color scale is kind of funky. I'm guessing it was automatically chosen by the mapping software to even split the number of regions amongst the five color bins, which I think kind of throws off the color distribution. I don't know. I think as a whole, the map is missing some special sauce.

    [Thanks, Christopher]

  • Sneak Peek: New Version of your.flowingdata Coming Soon

    The brand new version of your.flowingdata (YFD) is coming soon, and of course, as a FlowingData reader, you get the first peak. Newer readers might not know what I'm talking about. Well, it's an online application that lets you collect data about yourself via Twitter.

    Follow @yfd on Twitter to be the first to try it out when it's ready.
     Continue Reading 

  • Colored Tree, Cookies, and Stairs in Visualization Ad

    Posted to Data Art

    These ads for Hospital Alemán from Saatchi & Saatchi color code physical items for what parents say and what children do.

    TREE_HOSPITAL_COOKIES

    TREE_HOSPITAL_TREE

    It's not quantitative at all, and a lot of you probably won't even consider this visualization. It is pretty though, and I could see how this idea might be applied to data.

    [via I Believe in Advertising | Thanks, Ken]