• Flowchart shows the startup business cycle

    July 8, 2010  |  Infographics

    HackFwd Blueprint

    Technology and investment group HackFwd describes what it's like to work with them in a flowchart. In a nutshell: start with inspiration, work hard, impress people, work hard, and reap the rewards. And then start all over again.

  • Top World Cup players on Facebook

    July 5, 2010  |  Infographics

    World Cup on Facebook

    I always know when something exciting happens in the World Cup when my Facebook stream is flooded with announcements of a goooooooaaaal. On any given day, certain players are more talked about than others. The New York Times explores the day-to-day fluctuations of player mentions in Facebook status updates. Continue Reading

  • Challenge: What is a FIFA player’s worth?

    July 2, 2010  |  Discussion, Infographics

    What is a player's worth?

    I really want to like this graphic on the "worth" of FIFA players. The colors pop and the topic is potentially interesting. There are some graphics 101 pitfalls going on here though. How can you make this display better? Leave your two cents in the comments below.

    [via We Love Datavis]

  • Who participates online, by age

    July 1, 2010  |  Infographics

    What people are doing online

    Arno Ghelfi for Businessweek reports on who's doing what online, separated by age. The grid aesthetic totally works for the Internet theme, which can feel robotic and bit-wise at times.

    From top to bottom are the more active users to the more passive. Age groups run left to right. So as we sweep top left to bottom right, we see the younger generation who is more likely to write blogs and upload videos to YouTube, to an older crowd who are more likely to be content consumers.

    Update: Doh, this is from 2007. This cross-country move is throwing me out of wack. Oh well, it's still an interesting piece of Internet history.

  • Modern history of human communication

    June 30, 2010  |  Infographics

    Modern History of Human Communication (infographic)

    With the announcement of Google Voice for everyone, the big G describes the history of human communication in the graphic above - and consequently, how Voice is the next step in the evolution. We begin with the tin cans in 1810, to the telephone in 1876, then the first email in 1971, and tada, we arrive at Google Voice in the present. Average international call cost per minute serves as the backdrop.

    I gotta get me one of those vintage mobile phones of 1979.

    [via]

  • Texting volume during World Cup matches

    June 29, 2010  |  Infographics

    Texting volume time series

    I love how major sporting events can captivate an entire country or region, especially when there's the data to show the collective pulse. We saw it during the Canada-United States hockey gold medal match. Everyone flushed together. Similarly, O2, a UK mobile service provider, shows us texting volume during the World Cup and highlights the points of interest. England scores a goal and there's a flood of text messages. Goooal. Continue Reading

  • Education crisis explained in motion graphics

    June 28, 2010  |  Infographics

    Education crisis in motion graphics

    Buck, in collaboration with TakePart and An Inconvenient Truth director, Davis Guggenheim, describe the education crisis in America in motion graphics for upcoming documentary, Waiting for "Superman". Watch the video below. It's a more or less a run of education vitals, but it flows well and has a nice look and feel.

    Plus, it's an important subject we should know about. Maybe a new movement will get going once education gets the "inconvenient" treatment.
    Continue Reading

  • How to beat Mario Brothers 3 in 11 minutes

    June 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    Beat Mario in 11 Minutes

    I think it took me a few months to beat Super Mario Brothers 3 on Nintendo. Follow the directions in this graphic, and you should be able to beat it in 11 minutes. It'd probably still take me a few months. My video game talents tapped out at Kaboom on Atari. [via]

  • Free kick mechanics explained

    June 20, 2010  |  Infographics

    bend it

    I know next to nothing about soccer (a.k.a. football), but I gotta admit this Brazil vs. Ivory Coast match is more exciting than I thought it'd be. I can't say the same about the vuvuzelas though. In any case, to help neophytes like me, the New York Times graphics have helped a lot. Their most recent explains the mechanics of the free kick. They describe two approaches in the animated feature: the straight blast and the bend. Continue Reading

  • Profitable sweet spot for startups

    June 18, 2010  |  Infographics

    strategic sweet spot

    Gosh, it's so easy. I'm going to be rich. Get the strategic sweet spot and the three ingredients down, and you're set for life.

  • Glasses: the ultimate image changer

    June 17, 2010  |  Infographics

    driver vs professor

    This is hilarious and uber creative advertising. If I wore glasses, I'd totally buy from these guys.
    Continue Reading

  • Meet iPad’s competition

    June 17, 2010  |  Infographics

    ipad competition

    Light on the data, heavy on the aesthetics. Super pretty by Section Design. [via]

  • Facebook cultish insignia

    June 16, 2010  |  Infographics

    facebook hoodie insignia

    When asked to take off his hoodie during D8, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was incredibly reluctant and broke out into a serious sweat. After a bit of coaxing, however, Zuckerberg revealed a large insignia on the lining of his hoodie, representing Facebook's supposed mission statement: making the world open and connected. Audrey Fukuman reproduced the graphic for SF Weekly, from stills and video.

    What is its purpose? Only Facebook employees know for sure, but most likely it came out of a designer having some fun, and Facebook just rolling with it. Either that, or cult rituals in the ballpark in the middle of the night. It's either/or, really. What do you think? [via]

  • Evolution of the World Cup ball

    June 14, 2010  |  Infographics

    Evolution of world cup ball

    With the World Cup in full swing, the New York Times has been rolling out its World Cup-related graphics so you can stay on top of all the matches. They've got their live trackers, complemented with live blogging, and a map to find where to watch the game (in NY), based on what team you're rooting for.

    The best feature so far though is the evolution of the ball, from 1930 to present. It's a series of photos of each ball from every World Cup. Can you really beat the classic ball from the 1970 Cup in Mexico?
    Continue Reading

  • Physics of oil spills explained

    June 14, 2010  |  Infographics

    physics of oil spills

    What exactly is going on with all the oil spewing into the Gulf, biologically speaking? MSNBC explains in a series of graphics:

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill has released millions of gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico, making it the most devastating oil spill in U.S. history. It is clear that the spilled oil will have a large impact on the Gulf coast for years to come, but what happens to the oil in the first hours, days and weeks as it interacts with the surrounding elements?

    There are many physical and chemical processes, collectively known as weathering, that change the oil's properties and behavior after it is spilled into the ocean.

    It begins with the oil particles spreading, and over months and years, particles eventually sink to the ocean floor and micro-organisms feed on hydrocarbons in the spilled oil. After that, I like to think everyone refuses to buy anything BP-related and the company goes bye-bye.

    [Thanks, Jonah]

  • History of the United States in a circle

    June 13, 2010  |  Infographics

    presidential costs

    Presidential Costs by Rachel Mercer offers a look at the history of the United States:

    The outer circle illustrates presidential periods, the governing party, and whether or not the President died in office. The first inner circle shows the "eras" in history that those time periods covered. The third inner circle shows key foreign conflicts and wars. The fourth inner circle (purple) shows key legislative acts (or series of bills) that were issued. Finally, the bubbles in the middle indicate the average national debt, as indicated every 8 years.

    I like the look, but the average debt numbers do seem kind of iffy. I could be wrong though.

  • Context to underwater depths

    June 10, 2010  |  Infographics

    The Deepwater Horizon well is nearly a mile deep in water. It extends 3.5 miles. It's hard to imagine these depths of the ocean though since most of us have never gone further than twenty feet below. The New York Times' Bill Marsh provides some context. The Titanic rests 2.4 miles down, while in 1960, a U.S. Navy submersible descended to the deepest known ocean floor, about 7 miles into the darkness. [Thanks, Peter]

  • Track the 2010 MTV Movie Awards

    June 6, 2010  |  Infographics

    mtv-bars

    Excited about the 2010 MTV Movie Awards? Yeah, me neither. But if you want to keep an eye on things while you watch or do something else (you know, in case there's a Kanye moment), MTV and Stamen provide a tweet tracker for the event. Similar to the VMA tracker last year, movies and celebrities are highlighted based on tweets about them per minute. The look, feel, and views are different, however.
    Continue Reading

  • How little musicians earn online

    June 4, 2010  |  Infographics

    You've heard about the struggling musician. It's a tough business. How tough is it though? David McCandless of Information is Beautiful, looks at how much musicians make from major online outlets. Bubbles are sized by how many sales or plays a song must get before someone makes US monthly minimum wage.
    Continue Reading

  • Charting the radio top 40

    June 2, 2010  |  Infographics

    BBC Radio 1 takes a shot at displaying the top 40 chart visually in The Love 40. It's actually a lot better than I thought it was going to be.

    A grid view of bubbles arranges singles (or albums) such that you have each column as a day, and each row as a rank. So for example, the top right bubble, is the most recent number one single, which at the time of writing this, is Nothin' on You by B.o.B, featuring Bruno Mars. Roll over any song (i.e. bubble) and a connecting path shows how the song has risen or fallen in the past few weeks.
    Continue Reading

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