• How to Animate Transitions Between Multiple Charts

    How to Animate Transitions Between Multiple Charts

    Animated transitioning between chart types can add depth to your data display. Find out how to achieve this effect using JavaScript and D3.js.
  • Women as academic authors over the years

    January 7, 2013  |  Infographics

    Women as academic authors

    The Chronicle of Higher Education has a look at the percentage of academic papers published by women, over the past five centuries.

    The articles and authors described in this data were drawn from the corpus of JSTOR, a digital archive of scholarly papers, by researchers at the Eigenfactor Project at the University of Washington. About two million articles, representing 1765 fields and sub-fields, were examined, spanning a period from 1665 to 2011. The data are presented here for three time periods, the latest one ending in 2010, and a view that combines all periods.

    Percentage of female authors is on the horizontal, and each bubble is a subfield sized by total number of authors. The graphic starts with publishing for all years, but be sure to click on the tabs for each time span to see changes.

    The data is based on the archive of about two million articles from JSTOR, and a hierarchical map equation method is used to determine subfields.

    The gender classification they used for names seems like it could be nifty for some applications. Gender is inferred by comparing names against the ones kept by the U.S. Social Security Administration, which includes gender. If a name was used for female at least 95 percent of the time, it was classified as a female name, and the same was done with male. Anything ambiguous was not included in the study.

  • Your tax rate in 2012, and past rates since 1913

    December 20, 2012  |  Infographics

    Your effective tax rate

    What is your effective tax rate now versus years past? Ritchie King made an interactive to show you.

    Having not been alive in the '50s or '60s, let alone filing taxes, I was struck by the high top income tax rate—exactly double the highest tax rate today. It made me wonder: what would my income tax be if I had earned the equivalent of what I earn now several decades ago—or even in 1913, when the current federal income tax program was first introduced? What would the history of income taxes look like through the collective eyes of people in my exact financial situation over the past 100 years?

    Just enter your taxable income and filing status, and you get a time series of what your tax rate would've been years ago. It's kind of fun to mouse right to left to see your inflation-adjusted income.

    See also the New York Times piece from last month, which makes for an interesting contrast. Similar data was used, but the views are quite different.

  • An ideal bookshelf

    December 13, 2012  |  Network Visualization

    The Ideal Bookshelf

    Thessaly La Force, with illustrator Jane Mount, recently published My Ideal Bookshelf, which is a look into the books that some people of interest, including Judd Apatow, Chuck Klosterman, and Tony Hawk, would like to have on their ideal bookshelf. La Force's boyfriend took a more data-centric look at the collections.

    In the network above, each node is a person who listed their ideal books, and connections represent people who named the same books. Those in the center of the network had more book similarities than those on the edges. For example, James Franco named a ton of books and as you might expect has a bunch of connections. [via @shiffman]

  • Get a visual recap of your year on Twitter

    December 11, 2012  |  Statistical Visualization

    Year on Twitter

    As 2013 nears, let the recaps, reviews, and best ofs begin. Twitter put up their 2012 year in review of top tweets, trends, and such, which is mostly pictures and lists, but in collaboration with Vizify, they also have a section to visualize your own tweets. Click on the "View year on Twitter" button in the top right. Here's mine, for example. (Surprise, I mention maps, data, and charts often.)

    It's a word frequency chart that shows usage over the year. Scroll left to right or mouse over bubbles to see specific tweets. Mostly, it's just fun to look back. [Thanks, Todd]

  • Infinite Jukebox plays your favorite songs forever

    November 19, 2012  |  Network Visualization

    Infinite jukebox

    You know those songs that you love so much that you cry because they're over? Well, cry no more with the Inifinite Jukebox by Paul Lamere. Inspired by Infinite Gangnam Style, the Infinite Jukebox lets you upload a song, and it'll figure out how to cut the beats and piece them back together for a version of that song that goes forever.

    With The Infinite Jukebox, you can create a never-ending and ever changing version of any song. The app works by sending your uploaded track over to The Echo Nest, where it is decomposed into individual beats. Each beat is then analyzed and matched to other similar sounding beats in the song. This information is used to create a detailed song graph of paths though similar sounding beats. As the song is played, when the next beat has similar sounding beats there’s a chance that we will branch to a completely different part of the song. Since the branching is to a very similar sounding beat in the song, you (in theory) won’t notice the jump. This process of branching to similar sounding beats can continue forever, giving you an infinitely long version of the song.

  • Exploration of Hewlett grants

    November 14, 2012  |  Infographics

    Hewlett foundation

    Since 2000, the Hewlett Foundation has made over 7,000 grants summing $3.86 billion, to support communities around the world. Periscopic broke it down by area and amount. Each section is a heat map with years on the horizontal and amount on the vertical. The darker the shade of green, the more grants given that year for the corresponding amount. Click on a rectangle, and you can see the details of any individual grant. [Thanks, Kim]

  • All possible paths to the White House

    November 5, 2012  |  Infographics

    Possible paths

    With the election tomorrow, Mike Bostock and Shan Carter for the New York Times map the 512 possible paths to the White House. Select state wins, and the paths update accordingly. For example, select an Obama win in Florida, and it doesn't look good for Romney.

    If Mr. Romney loses Florida, he has only one way to victory: through all the other battleground states. He has led most polls there, however, and is the favorite. If Mr. Romney wins Florida, he has 75 paths open to him.

    The interaction feels game-like.

  • Every Lost episode visualized and recreated

    October 3, 2012  |  Network Visualization

    Lostalgic

    Santiago Ortiz visualized every episode of the show in the interactive Lostalgic. It's a set a four views that shows character occurrences and relationships and the lines they said during various parts of each episode.

    The first view, shown above, is a bar chart vertically arranged by time, where each row represents an act. A profile picture is shown whenever the corresponding character says something. The next two views, the network graph and co-occurrence matrix show interactions between characters, and finally, if you want to relive it all over again, you can choose the reenactment, and the animation will cycle through the characters and scripts.

    I only watched a handful of episodes right before the last one, but realized my efforts to watch all six seasons would be useless, even if I watched 24/7 before the finale. I got to the part where they found a dead person in a tree. So I'm only appreciating this from the technical side. I suspect fans of the show will love it. [Thanks, Santiago]

  • Game: Match states on a blank map

    October 1, 2012  |  Mapping

    Match states on a blank map

    In case you're interested in learning how much you suck at US state geography, here's a game to help. The goal is to match up states on the blank country map, and you end with an average error in miles. I did not do well. [via kottke]

  • Presidential campaign finance explorer

    September 26, 2012  |  Statistical Visualization

    Presidential campaign finance explorer

    Hey, I think it's election season, and you know what that means. It's time to dig into campaign finance data from the Federal Election Commission. The Washington Post gives you a view into the amount of money raised and spent in both camps, where it's coming from and where it's going. They start with the high-level aggregates, and as you scroll down, you get the time series, followed by the breakdowns for money raised.

    The spending categories at the bottom are the most interesting bit. They cover advertising and mail, down to consulting and events. Payroll was a lot higher than I would've thought.

  • Color names plotted against gender

    September 20, 2012  |  Statistical Visualization

    His and Hers Colors by Stephen Von Worley

    A couple of years ago, xkcd ran a survey that asked people to name colors. Stephen Von Worley plotted that data by gender in an interactive.

    That's a dot for each of the 2,000 most commonly-used color names as harvested from the 5,000,000-plus-sample results of XKCD's color survey, sized by relative usage and positioned side-to-side by average hue and vertically by gender preference. Women tend to use color names nearer the top, men towards the bottom, and the dashed line represents the 50-50 split (equal usage by both sexes).

    While his original version was static, the interactive version lets you sort by hue, saturation, brightness, popularity, and name length. Most importantly, you can see the color names now when you mouse over. I like the vertical spectrum of purple, where women use names like bright lilac, orchid, and heather, and men tend to label similar shades as purplish, lightish purple, and oh yes, very light purple. [Thanks, Stephen]

  • Voting similarities between Netherland cities

    September 18, 2012  |  Mapping

    Voting similarities between Netherland cities

    This month the Netherlands held national elections, and now that the results are in, interaction designer Jan Willem Tulp had a look at voting similarity between cities. I'm not sure what metric was used to judge similarity, but it looks like it was based on voting distributions for candidates.

    Each circle represents a city, and you can choose between a geographic layout or a radial one. When you select a circle, the others change size and color, where more red and larger means more similar. In the radial layout, circles that are farther are away are less similar. Be sure to look at the city of Urk in the radial layout. According to Tulp, it's the most religious city, and it votes completely differently from the rest. [Thanks, Jan]

  • Who pays for healthcare, 1960 to 2010

    August 27, 2012  |  Statistical Visualization

    Health care spending

    Josh Cothran looked at who's paid for healthcare over the past five decades, with an animated Marimekko chart.

    In 1960, almost 100% of the spending on prescription drugs came out of the consumer's pocket; by 2010, out-of-pocket spending was down to 20%. Over the past 50 years, there have been major shifts in the way hospital care, physician services, long-term care, prescription drugs, and other services and products are paid for. This interactive graphic uses data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to show national spending trends from 1960 to 2010 for health care by payer.

    In case you're unfamiliar with the layout, there are two visual dimensions to the Marimekko. On the vertical is percentage for the main categories: hospital care, physicians and clinical services, etc. On the horizontal is a breakdown of the main categories: private insurance, Medicare, etc. The animation brings time as a third dimension for which the overall size of the chart is constant, so pay attention to the changing relative percentages.

  • Most common London surnames mapped

    August 20, 2012  |  Mapping

    London surnames zoom

    James Cheshire, a geography lecturer at the University College London, mapped common surnames in London.

    This map shows the 15 most frequent surnames in each Middle Super Output Area (MSOA) across Greater London. The colours represent the origin of the surname (not necessarily the person) derived from UCL's Onomap Classification tool. The surnames have also been scaled by their total frequency in each MSOA.

    A slider lets you browse through the most common down to the 15th most common, revealing clusters of cultural majorities, down to minorities.

  • Character social networks in movies

    August 17, 2012  |  Network Visualization

    Movie Galaxies

    We've seen a lot of network charts for Twitter, Facebook, and real people. Screw that. I want to see social networks for movie characters. That's where Movie Galaxies comes in.

    Movies are important artefacts, bringing together vision and zeitgeist of our society. Embodying dreams, trends and other perspectives, they are a cultural vanishing point for millions of people in the world, that is worth to be explored. Just think about how your personal life and worldwide network with their single sub-clusters and side-stories are structurally represented in motion pictures. You might be surprised. We have a hunch that the "holy grail" of good movies is far more about social network structures than budget, cast and theme.

    With movie scripts as the data source, Movie Galaxies quickly shows main characters, the extent to which they interact, and hints at a movie's timeline. For example, in the first Lord of the Rings movie, the central plot was tied to a lot of characters, whereas in Forrest Gump, everything was tied to one character.

    There are metrics, such as density and clustering, associated with each network, which could be made less technical sounding, but it's fun to browse and search your favorite movies. I clicked around for a good half hour.

  • Circular Network Layout

    How to Make an Interactive Network Visualization

    Interactive network visualizations make it easy to rearrange, filter, and explore your connected data. Learn how to make one using D3 and JavaScript.
  • Map of the Internet

    July 30, 2012  |  Network Visualization

    The Internet Map

    Ruslan Enikeev created a searchable Internet map of links and bubbles, showing over 350,000 sites and two million links from 196 countries. Similar sites are closer together.
    Continue Reading

  • Worldwide mood around London 2012

    July 27, 2012  |  Data Art

    Olympic mood

    No doubt there is going to be a lot of tweeting about the Olympics during the next couple of weeks, but sometimes it's hard to get a sense of what people are talking about because of the high volume. Emoto, a team effort by Drew Hemment, Moritz Stefaner, and Studio NAND, is a Twitter tracker that aggregates sentiment around topics.
    Continue Reading

  • Tracking the spread of AIDS

    July 26, 2012  |  Statistical Visualization

    Spread of AIDS

    Adam Cole and Nelson Hsu for NPR plotted the percentage of people, ages 15 to 49, living with HIV from 1990 to 2009.

    By 1990, the world had a pandemic on its hands. In 1997, the peak of the epidemic, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.

    Then science struck back. Drugs approved for HIV treatment in the mid-1990s proved profoundly effective, transforming AIDS from a death sentence to a chronic illness. Those treatments, combined with an international commitment to manage the disease by providing access to free drug therapy, led to a steep drop in new HIV infections.

    The countries in middle, eastern, and southern Africa stand out in the chart, like Swaziland with a whopping 25.9%, but most areas cluster well below five percent. Although the drop-down filters help some with country selection, the data probably would've benefitted from a chart that had a self-updating vertical axis.

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