• Join Us in Atlantic City this Sunday – VisWeek Workshop

    October 7, 2009  |  Announcements

    Like I mentioned before, Robert Kosara (EagerEyes), Andrew Vande Moere (information aesthetics) and I are hosting a workshop on Visualization on the Web this Sunday (October 11) in Atlantic City as a part of VisWeek. So if you're in town, make sure you drop by.

    We accepted topic proposals earlier last month, and those will be presented (briefly) during the workshop, and we'll break into discussion from there. It'll be an informal event.

    Even if you didn't submit a paper or register, you're welcome to join. Everyone is welcome. There should be plenty of space.

    Find more information on EagerEyes. Remember, this Sunday, October 11, 2:00-5:30.

  • Trendsmap Shows Twitter Trends Geographically

    October 7, 2009  |  Mapping

    Twitter shows trending topics, but it's for the entire user base. You can only see what everyone on Twitter is talking about at any given time. Trendsmap, on the other hand, shows trending topics by location. See what's trending in any part of the world in real-time.
    Continue Reading

  • NYC BigApps Competition – $20k In Prize Money

    October 6, 2009  |  Data Sources

    It's exciting times for data heads. The launch of Data.gov back in May got things jump started; San Francisco recently announced DataSF; and now New York is getting in on the party with the announcement of their own Data Mine (live at 1pm EST today) and the NYC Big Apps competition.
    Continue Reading

  • Facebook Measures Happiness in Status Updates

    October 5, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    happiness-facebook

    As we all know, Facebook lets people update their friends with status updates, and with millions of users, that's a lot of data. Look at the aggregated data over time, and you could see some interesting trends.

    The Facebook Data Team recently measured happiness in the United States based on these updates with a metric they call United States Gross National Happiness.
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  • How Long People Live in America

    October 2, 2009  |  Projects

    Life Expectancy in America

    In this graphic, we take a look at some data on how long you're expected to live.

    Live in Hawaii and you just might live a little longer.

    Hawaii has an average life expectancy at birth of 80.0 years. It's 72.0 years in Washington, D.C., the lowest life expectancy in the country.

  • 30 Resources to Find the Data You Need

    October 1, 2009  |  Data Sources

    Let's say you have this idea for a visualization or application, or you're just curious about some trend. But you have a problem. You can't find the data, and without the data, you can't even start. This is a guide and a list of sources for where you can find that data you're looking for. There's a lot out there.

    Universities

    Being a graduate student, I always look to the library for books and resources. Many libraries are amping up their technology and have some expansive data archives. Many statistics departments also tend to keep a list of data somewhere. Continue Reading

  • Data Interface Iterations: Designing webtrendmap.com’s Stacks

    September 30, 2009  |  Online Applications

    545-stacks

    This is a guest post by Craig Mod, who collaborated with Information Architects, to develop Web Trend Map. The site, which is largely inspired by iA's previous work, lets you curate links with sources you trust. This post describes the multiple iterations and decisions made during the design process.

    Design and development of webtrendmap.com v1.0 took three months. During this period the interaction design and interface underwent countless subtle permutations. What we ended up with is almost totally unlike what we started with. There was a lot of painful iteration. A lot of gut wrenching backtracking.

    Let's drill down and take a look at how we iterated on one key webtrendmap.com visual element: the Stack. Continue Reading

  • FlowingPrints – You Can Now Buy Individual Posters

    September 29, 2009  |  Announcements

    Just a quick a update. Some of you emailed me to say that you loved the series, but really, only had enough space for one, so... you can now buy individual prints.

    The previously mentioned promotion code still works if you buy the complete series, which in the end actually gives you a price lower than that of two prints, so if you're going to buy two, it's better to just buy the set, and maybe give away the third. Nothing says I love you I like a data poster.

    Finally, thanks everyone for the support. It was a rocky start, but I think I've got things under control now. It just goes to show you can plan all you want, but in all likelihood Mr. Murphy is going to poke his head in and stir things up a bit. I guess it keeps life interesting, right?

    Make your walls smarter today.

  • Google Acquisitions Subway Map

    September 29, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    google-acquisitions

    Tack another graphic to the growing list of subway map metaphors. Meet the Boss "maps" Google acquisitions and investments, color-coding tracks by industry. The maroon track, for example, represents video, hence YouTube, which also interconnects with advertising and web services.

    The design is nothing new (and kind of overdone), but the data are pretty interesting. I've never even heard of most of the acquisitions.

    Does anyone know who was the first to use the subway map metaphor?

    [via TechCrunch]

  • FlowingPrints – I screwed up, so here’s the NEW deal

    September 28, 2009  |  Announcements

    Okay, I totally dropped the ball on this one. I must have proofread the designs a gajillion times before sending them out to print, but I missed a typo in one of them :(.

    So here's the NEW deal: it's a pair of prints at a lower price, and you can still save $20 with the code in the previous post (or email, if you're subscribed to that way).

    As a pair, we get two contrasting views into the data, statistical and illustrative.

    Visit the site to find out more.

    UPDATE: It turns out the "typo" was not a typo at all, so we have our complete series again. For my stupidity, I'm keeping the price at what it was when I only had a pair up, so you're essentially getting three for the price of two. Sorry for the confusion.

  • FlowingPrints is Live

    September 28, 2009  |  Announcements

    FlowingPrintsFinally, after lots of long nights, the first FlowingPrints poster series is now available.

    Big thanks to everyone who helped me along the way and for all of your emails and feedback. I'm really excited about this project, and clearly, many of you are too. Thanks for all the support.

    What is FlowingPrints?

    FlowingPrints is a collaboration between statistics and design. I worked with two designers, Atley G. Kasky and Robert Di Ieso, Jr., to create a series of three prints that each provide a very different view into the state of education in America. We put data on paper.

    And just for FlowingData readers, use this code by this Friday for $20 off: CQ4W9GWH

    Visit the site to find out more.

  • Share and Sell Data with Infochimps (100 Invites)

    September 25, 2009  |  Data Sources

    infochimpsThere's a lot of data on the Web, but it's all very scattered. At the same time, there's a lot of data sitting on people's hard drives that we don't have access to. There are various reasons why people don't share, but mainly, they just don't see the point.

    Infochimps tries to solve both of these problems with an open data marketplace.
    Continue Reading

  • Chart Junk vs. Eye Candy: What’s the Difference?

    September 25, 2009  |  Design

    There's this one phrase that really bothers me when it comes to data graphics. No doubt you've heard it or read it, and maybe it even popped into your head once or twice.

    The phrase I'm talking about is: "Edward Tufte is crying."

    People like to say this when they see a graphic that doesn't fit the ET law of high data/ink ratio. Then after the commenter has declared that ET is in fact a very emotional man, the graphic is classified "chart junk."

    First off, I'm pretty sure ET isn't that melodramatic. He doesn't cry over a bad graph nor does he die a little inside or roll over in his grave if he were dead. I don't think an angel get its wings every time he rings a bell either. Although I could be wrong about the latter.

    Second, not everything that fails to fit the mold of a traditional graph, visualization, or whatever you want to call it, is chart junk. One person's chart junk is another person's eye candy. What you see just depends on what angle you're looking at it from.
    Continue Reading

  • Online Dating Service Analyzes Intro Messages – How to Get a Response

    September 24, 2009  |  Statistics

    netspeak-chart

    Online dating can be tricky. What do you say? How do you reply to people? What should you put in your profile? Should you use that profile picture from 15 years ago?

    Well, fret no more, because OkCupid, an online dating service, analyzed over 500,000 introduction messages and whether or not they got a response from the message receiver. For example, the above graphs shows reply rates for intro messages that used netspeak. Here's a tip: don't use it, probably because it makes you sound like an idiot or you take writing advice from the comments on YouTube.

    Other fine tips include: avoid compliments on physical appearance (because it's the inside that counts) and don't try to bring the conversation outside the service (because that's creepy).

    [via Waxy]

  • TV Size Over the Past 8 Years

    September 23, 2009  |  Projects

    tv-size-by-year

    Apparently the average television size is going to be 60 inches by 2015. Do we really need that much television? I mean, come on.

    I used to watch my mom's old 9-inch black-and-white television in my room, and I thought it was the greatest thing ever. PacMan on my cousin's hand-me-down Atari couldn't look any better. Things are a little different now, yeah? I wonder what my Xbox games would look like on that old TV.

    Anyways, I scraped television size data from CNET reviews, representing the past eight years or so, and actually, growth isn't as dramatic as you might think.

  • Thanks to Our FlowingData Sponsors

    September 22, 2009  |  Sponsors

    I'd like to take a quick moment to thank our FlowingData sponsors. They help keep FlowingData online and running smoothly. Without them, things around here would be painfully slow.

    Check out the data visualization solutions they have to offer:

    Xcelsius Present — Transform spreadsheets into professional, interactive presentations.

    NetCharts — Build business dashboards that turn data into actionable information with dynamic charts and graphs.

    Tableau Software — Data exploration and visual analytics for understanding databases and spreadsheets that makes data analysis easy and fun.

    IDV Solutions — Create interactive, map-based, enterprise mashups in SharePoint.

    InstantAtlas — Enables information analysts to create interactive maps to improve data visualization and enhance communication.

    Want to sponsor FlowingData, your most favorite blog in the whole wide world? Email me, and I'll get back to you with the details.

  • Watch the Giants of Finance Shrink… Then Grow

    September 22, 2009  |  Infographics

    finance

    From Karl Russel and Shan Carter of The New York Times is this animated tree map to show the shrinking, and eventual partial regrowth, in market value of this country's largest financial groups.

    The market peak was in October 9, 2007. With the exception of a few months since then, most companies decreased in market capitalization. They then hit a low in March 9, 2009, and have slowly regaining what they lost.

    At the peak, the value of the 29 firms was $1.87 trillion. As of September 11 of this year, their total value was at $947 billion. Clearly, there is still quite a way to go before they're back to where they began.

    [via infosthetics]

  • Posters for People Who Love Data + Design

    September 21, 2009  |  Announcements

    Data graphics that aren't interactive are better in print, no doubt about it.

    I realized this a few years ago while interning for a popular graphics department. It was one thing to see my graphics online, but it was always so much cooler to see them in the paper.

    Online stuff is great, but it's fleeting. You glance, scan, and browse when you're online. You look, examine, and read when it's in print.

    Plus, paper provides more space. Data needs room to breathe.

    Enter FlowingPrints.

    Data + Design Posters

    Posters For People Who Love Data + Design

    Simply put, FlowingPrints is a project to get data in print. It's like FlowingData's better looking cousin.

    I mentioned the project a while ago, and I'm happy to say that the first series will be available in less than a week.

    I collaborated with two designers – Atley G. Kasky and Robert Di Ieso, Jr. – to create a three-poster series around a single theme: the state of education. We looked at several decades of data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).

    Each poster gives you a different point of view, and each tells a different story.

    The Authors

    Atley is a graphic designer at GOOD and co-curates But Does it Float; Robert is a designer and illustrator who has done work for The New York Times, Time Inc., and Fast Company Magazine; and me, well, you already know what I do.

    That should give you a hint as to what type of design you're going to see in these posters. Needless to say, it'll be a healthy mix of traditional statistical graphics and tasty eye candy, informative and fun to examine.

    Be First to Know + Special Offer

    This week, I'm putting in the finishing touches, and we'll be ready to go. If you haven't already, you can sign up on this page to be first to know when the series is available; I'll email you the minute FlowingPrints goes live. It'll be first-come, first-served.

    There will also be a promotion code in the announcement email, so make sure you take advantage of that too.

    More soon...

  • Infographic Music Video on the Elements – They Might Be Giants

    September 18, 2009  |  Infographics

    It's not often you get a Grammy-winning band to play a song for a children's album with an infographic music video on the scientific elements, but that's what you get from They Might Be Giants.
    Continue Reading

  • Getting a Good Night’s Sleep – Good Night and Tough Luck

    September 17, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    Hilarious as always, Christoph Niemann illustrates in his graphical New York Times op-ed how getting a good night's sleep is easier said than done, especially when you have a small bladder, mosquitoes that won't go away, and a kid with nightmares. Enjoy.
    Continue Reading

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