• Extinctions and animal species at risk

    September 12, 2014  |  Infographics

    A Disappearing Planet

    Data journalist Anna Flagg for ProPublica reported on animal species at higher risk of extinction.

    Animal species are going extinct anywhere from 100 to 1,000 times the rates that would be expected under natural conditions. According to Elizabeth Kolbert's The Sixth Extinction and other recent studies, the increase results from a variety of human-caused effects including climate change, habitat destruction, and species displacement. Today's extinction rates rival those during the mass extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

    The data has an interesting organization. Think back to sixth-grade science and remember that animals are grouped in a hierarchy of order, family, genus, and species. This hierarchy is represented with horizontal bars on the bottom, vertical line pointers, vertical bars, and elements within each bar, respectively.

    Once you get down to the genus level (vertical bars), the interactive gets kind of tough to use unless you search for a specific species. I want some filters or some breakout sections to highlight spots to look at. However, as a tool for those closer to the challenge, this seems like it could be quite useful.

  • Chart-topping songs

    Chart-Topping Songs as Graphs and Diagrams

    Dreams, hope, and most importantly, love, mixed with some parties and dranking.
  • A Truncated Story of Infinity

    September 11, 2014  |  Miscellaneous

    A Truncated Story of Infinity, a short film by Paul Trillo, explores the infinite possibilities in the mundane and everyday — "cosmic doppelgangers." So many small things can change the course of a day entirely.

    There were a lot of moments that reminded me of the opening scene from Stranger Than Fiction.

  • Generative book covers

    September 10, 2014  |  Data Art

    Generative book covers

    The New York Public Library is developing an eBook-borrowing system, which includes an app that helps you keep track of books, process, and such. One of the challenges is displaying the covers of available books when many of the works don't actually have a cover, so NYPL Labs turned to generative covers that could be made on the fly. Mauricio Giraldo Arteaga, in charged of design, explains the process.

    The code for iOS and Processing is available on GitHub.

  • Beat Blox

    September 10, 2014  |  Data Art

    Beat Blox is a student project by Per Holmquist from Beckmans College of Design. Blocks are placed on a turntable, and beats sound accordingly. Super playful.

    [via CAN]

  • Dinosaurs versus airplane

    September 9, 2014  |  Infographics

    Dinosaurs versus airplane

    Scientists found the fossils of a giant dinosaur that they estimate was 26 meters long and 60 tons heavy. How much is that really? BBC News provided a simple chart to put size into perspective. They compared dinosaur sizes to a moose, African Elephant, and a Boeing 737-900.

    Impressive. Although not as impressive as Mega Shark. [Thanks, Jim]

  • Old maps overlaid on Google Maps

    September 8, 2014  |  Mapping

    Old maps overlaid on Google Maps

    The British Library georeferencing project places old maps, as far back as the 16th century, on top of Google Maps for browsing and as a mode of comparison.

    The British Library began a project to crowdsource the georeferencing of its scanned historic mapping in 2011 by partnering with Klokan Technologies to customise its online georeferencing tool. There have been five public releases of maps since 2012, all of which met with tremendous success. In total over 8,000 maps have been "placed" by participants and subsequently checked for accuracy and approved.

    Has someone else done this? I feel like I've seen something like this project before, but the closest thing I can think of is Historypin, which overlaid images on top of Google Streetview.

  • Style over function for redesigned choking posters

    September 5, 2014  |  Infographics

    Escape from Choking in New York by Phil Ashworth

    In many parts of the country, the departments of health require that eating establishments put up posters that instruct you what to do in case someone is choking. The posters are government-issued, but some people are putting up redesigned posters that fit in with restaurant decor. The Sideshow Podcast covers the trend and some of the ridiculous posters to come out of it.
    Continue Reading

  • Cosmic map shows Milky Way at the edge of a supercluster

    September 4, 2014  |  Mapping

    Nature highlights the research of R. Brent Tully et al, which defines a supercluster called Laniakea. A supercluster is like a network of galaxies, and according to this work, the Milky Way is at the edge of this one.

    From the abstract:

    Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

    See the full paper here [pdf].

  • Race distributions of police departments versus residents

    September 4, 2014  |  Infographics

    Race Gap in Police Departments by NYT

    When you compare distributions of race for police departments and for the residents of the area they serve, you find disparity in many metropolitan areas. Jeremy Ashkenas and Haeyoun Park for the New York Times report, focusing on the higher percentage of white police officers.

    Stacked bars show race distributions for residents (top) and the respective police department (bottom) for selected cities. A map for each area shows bubbles colored by amount of gap and sized by number of police officers. The darker the shade of green, the bigger the gap, so you see mostly green maps.

  • When people work, by job category

    September 4, 2014  |  Statistical Visualization

    When people work

    In another use of data from the American Time Use Survey, Planet Money looks specifically at the hours people work, separated by twenty job categories. Each density area represents a category, and height represents the percentage of people (estimated with survey answers) who are at work at various hours of the day.

    The interesting bit is that you can select two job categories to easily compare at once. For example, the above shows transportation in yellow against protective services in blue. For the latter, you see a more spread out distribution, as it's more common for those in protective services to work at night.

    Make your own comparisons.

    The stacked area chart from the New York Times from almost six years ago (whoa, time) is still my favorite visualization of the survey data.

  • Segregated schools, still

    September 3, 2014  |  Mapping

    Share of white kids attending majority-white schools

    The map above by MetroTrends shows the percent of white kids who attended majority-white schools during the 2011-12 school year. Schools are still segregated in many areas of the country.

    From Reed Jordan for MetroTrends:

    The separation of races is most clearly seen in large metropolitan counties that hold the bulk of a state’s population and most of its students of color. For example, in Chicago (Cook County), the overall student population is about 25 percent white, 31 percent black, and 37 percent Latino, but 96 percent of black students attend majority non-white schools and 67 percent of white students attend majority white schools. In other words, white students tend to attend schools with other white students and black and Latino students attend schools with other students of color.

    Estimates are from the National Center for Education Statistics. [via @datatelling]

  • Out, liar.

    September 2, 2014  |  Miscellaneous

    Outlier

    By Ben Shabad, full-time graduate student and part-time cartoon-drawing person.

  • PlotDevice: Draw with Python

    September 2, 2014  |  Software

    PlotDevice

    You've been able to visualize data with Python for a while, but Mac application PlotDevice from Christian Swinehart couples code and graphics more tightly. Write code on the right. Watch graphics change on the right.

    The application gives you everything you need to start writing programs that draw to a virtual canvas. It features a text editor with syntax highlighting and tab completion plus a zoomable graphics viewer and a variety of export options.

    PlotDevice's simple but com­pre­hen­sive set of graphics commands will be familiar to users of similar graphics tools like NodeBox or Processing. And if you're new to programming, you'll find there's nothing better than being able to see the results of your code as you learn to think like a computer.

    Looks promising. Although when I downloaded it and tried to run it, nothing happened. I'm guessing there's still compatibility issues to iron out at version 0.9.4. Hopefully that clears up soon. [via Waxy]

  • Emotional dynamics of literary classics

    September 1, 2014  |  Statistics

    Happiness meter for Huck Finn

    As a demonstration of efforts in estimating happiness from language, Hedonometer charts emotion over time for literary classics. The above is the collection of charts for Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.

    I wish I could say this meant something to me, but comparative literature in high school was never my strong suit. From a totally superficial point of view though, the chart in the top left shows happiness metrics — based on the research of Peter Dodds and Chris Danforth — through the entirety of the book. The chart on the right shows a comparison of book sections, which you can select in the first chart.

  • Louisiana is drowning

    August 29, 2014  |  Mapping

    Losing Ground by Propublica

    Louisiana is quickly losing much of its coast to the Gulf of Mexico. ProPublica and The Lens just launched an interactive project that shows you by how much and tells the story of those affected.

    In 50 years, most of southeastern Louisiana not protected by levees will be part of the Gulf of Mexico. The state is losing a football field of land every 48 minutes — 16 square miles a year — due to climate change, drilling and dredging for oil and gas, and levees on the Mississippi River. At risk: Nearly all of the nation's domestic energy supply, much of its seafood production, and millions of homes.

    There is a lot to look at and learn about, but the most telling is when you zoom in to specific regions indicated by squares on the map. Use the timeline that appears at the top of the map to see how the coastline, based on satellite imagery, has diminished since 1932. It's disconcerting.

  • How to make dot density maps

    How to Make Dot Density Maps in R

    Choropleth maps are useful to show values for areas on a map, but they can be limited. In contrast, dot density maps are sometimes better for showing distributions within regions.
  • Interactive tool shows impact of terrorism

    August 28, 2014  |  Infographics

    A World of Terror by Periscopic

    The Global Terrorism Database, maintained by the University of Maryland, is an open source database that catalogs terrorism events since 1970 through 2013. Data visualization firm Periscopic visualized the incident-level data in A World of Terror.

    There are over 3,065 organizations and groups listed in the GTD. To identify the top 25 organizations who used terrorist tactics, we determined the groups with the most killings, the most wounded, and the most incidents. We wanted to make sure we were inclusive of all actions, including those that neither wounded nor killed. We aggregated these 3 lists and took the top 25 organizations (most were in the top 30 for all 3 categories). These top 0.8% of groups account for over 26% of the 125,087 incidents.

    The midsection of each group shows number of incidents by month and year. The darker the brown, the more incidents on record. Then on the top and bottom shows number of people killed in red and wounded in orange, respectively. Finally, click on the map in the top left for more information about the organization.

    Spend some time with this one. Periscopic shows a lot without it ever feeling like too much.

  • Graph-based video game

    August 27, 2014  |  Data Art

    Last year, Metrico, an infographic-based puzzle game for the PlayStation Vita, was announced for future release. It's out now.

    I must've been in a pissy mood from too many spam-fographics in my suggestions inbox last year, because I brushed this game off for whateversville (and seemed upset about it). Metrico totally seems like a game I would like though. You essentially navigate a 3-D world of graphs, and the terrain changes based on your own actions and button pushes. Just don't use the game design as an idea bucket for your next slide deck. [via Wired]

  • Face tracking coupled with projection mapping

    August 26, 2014  |  Data Art

    Projection mapping — the use of projected images onto physical objects to turn them into something else — continues to grow more impressive. Nobumichi Asai and team combined it with face tracking to completely change a person's face to someone and something else.

    Slightly creepy. Super fascinating. [via Boing Boing]

Copyright © 2007-2014 FlowingData. All rights reserved. Hosted by Linode.
7ads6x98y