• 25 Highest Grossing Films of All Time (Wallpaper)

    January 2, 2008  |  Data Sources

    I love to look at how the current week's movies are doing at the box office. I'm not really sure what it is. I think it's kind of like a gauge for what good movies are out; or maybe I'm just constantly amazed by the millions of dollars that movies make; or I think it could be my addiction to numbers?

    Something that always strikes me as interesting is how movies are always breaking records at the box office. So and so movie just broke the record for most money made over a single weekend or a month or a long holiday weekend or for a Thursday when there was at least 2 inches of rain and a dog skateboarded two miles.

    I took a look at the 25 highest grossing American films, adjusted for inflation. I'm so tired of hearing statistics for money comparisons over time that don't adjust for inflation. Wow, gasoline prices are at an all time high. Well guess what -- so are milk, bread, burgers, televisions, light bulbs, paper, cars, and everything else on the planet. Sorry, slight tangent.

    Download the Wallpaper

    As an early birthday gift to you, here are my results in wallpaper form:

    Grossing Films Wallpaper 1024 x 7681024 x 768

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    1440 x 900

    The movie titles are color coded for genre and the higher grossing films are in a larger font. Drama and action/adventure clearly dominate -- The hills are alive. Luke, I am your father. Phone home. I'll never go hungry again.

    Surprisingly (at least to me), only 7 of the top 25 films won the Oscar for best picture and of the top 50, only 9 won best picture.

  • Download Detailed Baseball Statistics from the DataBank

    December 21, 2007  |  Data Sources

    1220-baseball

    Baseball (or all sports for that matter) statistics are all over the place. You can easily find data for pretty much whatever sport and for whichever player you want at any given time. The problem is that if you want to download all of the data at once, you usually have to write a script and do some parsing. Who wants to do that? I don't.
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  • Migration/Demographics Database Available for Download

    December 14, 2007  |  Data Sources

    United Nations and Migration InformationFor our humanflows visualization, we used data from the United Nations Common Database and the Migration Information Source. The great thing about these types of sources is that they are publicly available so that everyone gets to have fun with the data. The downside is that the data is accessible via a user interface that often makes it a chore to get all of the data.

    Hence, to save you some time, you can now download the migration database that we used. I don't see any reason why you have to go through the whole data importing process when we already did it. Enjoy!

    Disclaimer: Keep in mind that the data is from the United Nations and Migration Information Source, so you should refer to the two sites for any documentation. In a nutshell, the inflows table is from MIS and the rest is from United Nations. If you're looking for more, you might also want to check out OECD. I really wanted to use their data at the time, but was having trouble accessing it from Spain.

  • Fast Food Restaurant Menu Items Compared

    November 14, 2007  |  Data Sources

    McDonald’s Big MacWe all know fast food is incredibly bad for us and yet we still eat it. Why? Because it has tons of fat and tastes delicious. Nevermind that we will die a few days earlier for every French fry we eat.

    Over at Calorie Counter, they try to make us feel guilty with numbers. Check out the Carl's Jr. Double Six Double Dollar Burger with 1,520 Calories and a delicious 111 grams of fat. I'm a little surprised that it beat out the Burger King Triple Whopper with cheese. I shudder just thinking about eating one of those.

    Anyways, there's a whole lot of numbers here but not an incredible amount of meaning. How bad is bad? How much fat should I consume per day? Is 111 grams of fat bad? If yes, how will it directly affect me? Yes, 111 grams of fat is bad for you. You will directly feel the effects as you sit on the toilet in the morning wondering why it is taking you so long to take a dump. Now that's context.

    Also, with all the numbers, I bet all the tables would benefit from some kind of chart or, at the least, a simple infographic. Any takers? We should have a contest for who can make fast food the least appealing using nutritional data and without bending the truth.

  • Education Statistics Free, Available, and Waiting for You

    October 15, 2007  |  Data Sources

    Raw, fine-grain data is still a bit hard to come by. Summary statistics (i.e. data that came from some analysis), on the other hand, are often easy to find. A lot of the time the data is already online or just a simple phone call away.

    The National Center for Education Statistics, a part of the U.S. Department of Education, offers a bunch of data including, but not at all limited to, poverty and math achievement, average science scores overall and by grade level, and quantitative literacy.
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  • 360 Variables Describing the United States

    September 5, 2007  |  Data Sources

    Order From Randomness Data Browser

    Order From Randomness has an extensive data collection featuring 360 variables describing all 50 states. The indicators are placed in 25 groups including birth rates, death rates, disease, environment, energy, nutrition, and education.

    Most of the data seems to range somewhere between 1999 and 2005, and I believe there's four variables to 2007. There's also a simple data browser featuring a distribution curve and some summary statistics. Generally, students seem to like the extensive set of variables, says one of my professors.

  • U.S. News & World Report College Rankings are Now Available

    August 17, 2007  |  Data Sources

    The well-known college rankings are now available for your viewing pleasure. Whether the ranking system is legit or not, I'll let you be the judge, but I think everyone should take note that UC Berkeley was again the number one ranked public national university and UCLA was ranked number three. Go Calee-forn-ee-ah! In a nutshell, here's what U.S. News ranks the universities:

    • Peer Assessment - 25%
    • Retention - 20% in national universities and liberal arts colleges and 25% in master's and baccalaureate colleges
    • Faculty Resources - 20%
    • Student Selectivity - 15%
    • Financial Resources - 10%
    • Graduate Rate Performance - 5%; only in national universities and liberal arts colleges
    • Alumni giving rate 5%

    I wonder how much bias is in peer assessment.

  • Making Public Data Public

    July 11, 2007  |  Data Sources

    As Jon Udell has mentioned, there's a ton of data online, but it's not often we can find it, often hidden in the deep, dark basement of some website. He has proposed that people book mark public datasets on del.icio.us under the tag "publicdata". I think this is a great idea. In turn, you can subscribe to the feed with the url http://del.icio.us/tag/publicdata.

    I've been doing this already for a while, but I had been just tagging with "data". So I'm going to join in on the party and start tagging with publicdata, and I hope others will too. Until sites like Many Eyes and Swivel get more wind beneath their wings, I think it's necessary.

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