• Running traces

    November 11, 2013  |  Mapping

    Copenhagen

    The Endomondo app lets you keep track of your workouts, namely running and cycling, so it records your location, and then estimates your speed, calories burned, and elevation changes. And workouts are set to public by default. Nikita Barsukov used the public traces to make some quick and dirty maps of workouts in major European cities. Above is Copenhagen.

    I'm curious about how these compare to car traffic or social media usage. Are they opposites or are they roughly the same, corresponding to number of people who live in an area? And, of course, I want to know what this looks like for American cities.

  • The safest time to drive

    November 8, 2013  |  Infographics

    Safest day to drive

    As we've seen, there are more fatal car crashes during the weekend and summer months, which is some time between May and September in the United States. The Guardian took a different approach to look at road fatalities in Australia.

    The bottom section is your standard bar charts that show an average, but on top are mini-simulations that represent the averages. Small cars move in the background and squares appear on top to at different volumes. I originally thought the cars actually collided with each square, but it looks like they're independent of each other. Nevertheless, an interesting approach.

  • Estimated coastlines if the ice melted

    November 6, 2013  |  Mapping

    If all the ice melted

    National Geographic imagined new coastlines (and the cities that would go under) if all the ice melted, raising sea level by 216 feet.

    There are more than five million cubic miles of ice on Earth, and some scientists say it would take more than 5,000 years to melt it all. If we continue adding carbon to the atmosphere, we'll very likely create an ice-free planet, with an average temperature of perhaps 80 degrees Fahrenheit instead of the current 58.

    The light blue borders represent present day, and the land shows estimates. London, Venice, Bangladesh, and all of Florida would be submerged, and Australia would gain a new inland sea. Of course, estimates assume not much else changes. [via kottke]

  • Roomba traces

    November 6, 2013  |  Data Art

    Radiolab roomba art

    We've seen what happens when you turn on a Roomba and track its vacuum path with long-exposure photography. The LED on top provides a point of focus, and the visual represents an odd blend of chaos and order. Above is what happens when you set different colored LEDs on seven Roombas and let them loose. Don't miss all the other (clean) messes in the Flickr pool. [via Radiolab]

  • Six decades of U.S. migration

    November 4, 2013  |  Mapping

    Net migration patterns

    We know that millions of Americans move to different counties every year, and when you look at the net totals, you see a pattern of people migrate from the midwest to the coasts. However, look at migration across demographic categories, and you see more detailed movement. This was the goal of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and they recently released their estimates, in map form.
    Continue Reading

  • Accidental aRt

    October 31, 2013  |  Visualization

    Accidental aRt

    There comes a time late at night when your screen grows fuzzy and the code runs together. Mistakes happen, and with visualization, the bugs often manifest themselves into abstract images that sort of resemble data. The Accidental aRt tumblr highlights these visual mistakes through the eyes of buggy R code. Ooo, infinite rainbow.

  • Beauty of mathematics

    October 28, 2013  |  Data Art

    Betrand Russell: "Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." Yann Pineill and Nicolas Lefaucheux demonstrate in the video above. An equation appears on the left, a diagram in the middle, and the real-life version on the right.

  • Digital attack map

    October 25, 2013  |  Mapping

    Digital Attack Map

    A Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack attempts to disable a site or web service by sending a ton of requests from multiple sources. Essentially, the server buckles under the pressure. Sometimes this is done to silence sites that the attackers disagree with, or they might try to take advantage of business backends.

    The Digital Attack Map, a collaboration between Google Ideas and Arbor Networks, shows current attacks and serves as a browser for past attacks around the world. Color and size indicate the type of attack and movement represents origins and destinations.

  • Evolution of western dance music

    October 24, 2013  |  Network Visualization

    Dance music

    A quick animated look on the evolution of western dance music, a mixture and blend of various styles and cultures over time.

    To make it easier to trace the threads of music history, we’ve created an interactive map detailing the evolution of western dance music over the last 100 years. The map shows the time and place where each of the music styles were born and which blend of genres influenced the next.

    There's a cartogram in the background and lines connect countries and styles. It reminds me of those dance step charts with the feet on them.

  • Most popular girl names by state

    October 22, 2013  |  Mapping

    Most popluar girl names by state in 2012

    Reuben Fischer-Baum looks at the most popular girl names by state, over the past six decades.

    Baby naming generally follows a consistent cycle: A name springs up in some region of the U.S.—"Ashley" in the South, "Emily" in the Northeast—sweeps over the country, and falls out of favor nearly as quickly. The big exception to these baby booms and busts is "Jennifer", which absolutely dominates America for a decade-and-a-half. If you're named Jennifer and you were born between 1970 and 1984, don't worry! I'm sure you have a totally cool, unique middle name.

    Like the trendy names and unisex names explorations, this series of maps is based on data from the Social Security Administration, which is surprisingly formatted and ready to use. If you're looking to play around with time series data and simple state geography, the SSA site is worth a bookmark. [Thanks, John]

  • Regional personality

    October 21, 2013  |  Mapping

    Regional personality

    Peter J. Rentfrow, et al. studied personality clusters across states using data from five surveys, totaling responses from about 1.6 million people. They recently published their results in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology [pdf].

    There is overwhelming evidence for regional variation across the United States on a range of key political, economic, social, and health indicators. However, a substantial body of research suggests that activities in each of these domains are typically influenced by psychological variables, raising the possibility that psychological forces might be the mediating or causal factors responsible for regional variation in key indicators.

    They found three main clusters, mapped above: friendly and conventional, relaxed and creative, and temperamental and uninhibited.

    The maps suggest that states belong only to specific clusters, but I suspect it's a more continuous scale. For instance, a state might be partially part of cluster 1 and 2, not really 3, as opposed to just cluster 1. Still though, it's an interesting start. Now if only the data they used were more easily accessible.

  • Super duper full-featured paper map

    October 15, 2013  |  Mapping

    Check out this awesome new thing called MAP. It's made of 100% sustainable material, easy to share, unbreakable, fits in your pocket, and most importantly, shares none of your information.

    Pre-ordered.

  • Average man graphic renderings

    October 14, 2013  |  Visualization

    Renderings of average man

    James Hamblin for The Atlantic rendered the average American man based on BMI and compared him to the average man in other countries. Hamblin named the average man Todd.

    Though in his face this reads lonesome, Todd does have three international guyfriends. They met at a convention for people with perfectly average bodies, where each won the award for most average body in their respective country: U.S., Japan, Netherlands, and France. The others' BMIs, based on data from each country's national health centers, are 23.7, 25.2, and 25.6.

    I named them all Todd, actually, even though it could be confusing, because not everyone's name is a testament to their cultural heritage.

  • Maritime traffic in the Baltic Sea, animated

    October 11, 2013  |  Mapping

    Digital artist Lauri Vanhala animated a day of maritime traffic in the Baltic Sea.

    Here's a marine traffic and accident visualization that I created for the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission. The video was shown last week in a conference where the ministers of environment in the region of Baltic Sea and a bunch of other professionals were discussing how to protect the vulnerable and polluted sea in the future.

    The background music feels cinematic but not surprising given the audience. I particularly like the highlighting and annotation sync around the one-minute mark.

    See also: Britain from Above and Netherlands from Above. Oldies but goodies.

  • Map of median home listing prices

    October 10, 2013  |  Mapping

    Median home listing prices

    In their continued efforts to help potential home buyers find out all they can about the neighborhoods they want to live in, Trulia added median listing prices to their set of local maps. In the zoomed out view, you get prices per county, at medium zoom it's per ZIP code, and zoomed in all the way it's per block. You can also see sale price and sale price per square foot.

    With this, supplemented by crime data, commute, schools, and natural hazards, Trulia's maps are a required stop for home buyers.

  • Furloughed employees during shutdown

    October 9, 2013  |  Statistical Visualization

    Government shutdown

    Dan Delany took a simple look at furloughed employees due to the government shutdown. There are tickers for duration, estimated unpaid salary, and estimated food vouchers unpaid, but the main view is the interactive tree map that shows furloughed proportions by department.

    Data was nicely collated into one spreadsheet from a bunch of government-released PDF files (of course), and the code for the page is available on Github. [Thanks, Dan]

  • Real-time media consumption

    October 7, 2013  |  Mapping

    Bitly media map

    Last year, URL shortening service bitly and Forbes made a map that showed popular news sources by state. However, the map was based on a static month of data, so what it showed then doesn't necessarily apply to now. Bitly took it a step further this year and shows media consumption in real-time.

    They also categorized media sources into newspapers, tv and radio, magazines, and online only for a more detailed view. And to top it off, you can click on states to see a list of top sources, and you can see links driving traffic to the listed sites.

    One key thing to keep in mind as you read the maps: They show disproportionality rather than raw counts. So when you see that Texas is a TMZ fiend, that doesn't mean they click more on the celebrity news site more than on Huffington Post. Rather, it means the relative volume of TMZ-clicking from Texas versus other states is higher versus the relative volume of Huffington Post-clicking.

  • 10 seconds of extreme trading

    October 4, 2013  |  Network Visualization

    The video below shows ten seconds of trading on Blackberry on October 2, when they reported a bigger loss than they thought. It might also be a super advanced level of Space Invaders.

  • Most visited site by country

    October 3, 2013  |  Mapping

    Top site by country

    Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata for Information Geographies mapped the most visited site based on Alexa data. Countries are sized by Internet population. There aren't many surprises with Facebook and Google in the Americas and and Europe, but it gets more interesting when you look elsewhere.

    The situation is more complex in Asia, as local competitors have been able to resist the two large American empires. Baidu is well known as the most used search engine in China, which is currently home to the world’s largest Internet population at over half a billion users. At the same time, we see a puzzling fact that Baidu is also listed as the most visited website in South Korea (ahead of the popular South Korean search engine, Naver). We speculate that the raw data that we are using here are skewed. However, we may also be seeing the Baidu empire in the process of expanding beyond its traditional home territory.

    The remaining territories that have escaped being subsumed into the two big empires include Yahoo! Japan in Japan (in join venture with SoftBank) and Yahoo! in Taiwan (after the acquisition of Wretch). The Al-Watan Voice newspaper is the most visited website in the Palestinian Territories, the e-mail service Mail.ru is the most visited in Kazakhstan, the social network VK the most visited in Belarus, and the search engine Yandex the most visited in Russia.

  • Greco-Roman mapmaking

    October 1, 2013  |  Mapping

    Peutinger map

    Measuring and Mapping Space: Geographic Knowledge in Greco-Roman Antiquity opens at Institute for the Study of the Ancient World of NYU, this Friday. The exhibit serves as an appreciation of maps and more importantly, the history behind them and what they represent of their time.

    Our modern knowledge of ancient cartography relies almost exclusively on written sources. Despite this paucity of ancient artifacts, it is clear that Greeks and Romans applied topographical studies to the mapping of land and sea routes, to the implementation of an accurate system of recording public and private lands, and to promote specific political agendas. In all these instances, the resulting representations of places presented the viewer with a distorted and schematized version of geographic and topographic elements, transforming those regions both on a conceptual and on a physical level.

    [via The New York Times]

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