• Field guide to typographic moustaches

    July 23, 2010  |  Data Art

    Typestaches infographic

    Sure, why not, let's make it a hairy Friday. From Tor Weeks: a series of moustaches styled by their typographic counterpart, aka typestaches. The big and bold typefaces like Federal and Wide Latin get thick and burly moustaches, while the more delicate typefaces, get thin and curvy.

    If only facial hair were as easy to select as fonts. I'd get myself a 24pt Mr. Century Ultra.

    Grab a print for yourself here.

    [via kottke]

  • History of The Beatles as told by their hair

    July 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    History of the beatles hair infographic

    The Beatles were famously known for their mop-top haircuts in the early 1960s, but their styles evolved over time. DeviantArt user mozzarellapoppy has a look at the hair, moustache, and spectacle changes over an eight-year span. Watch as they slowly morph into The Bee Gees.

    [via Alison]

  • Global forest heights mapped in detail by NASA

    July 21, 2010  |  Mapping

    Global forest heights mapped by NASA

    NASA has mapped the world's forest heights, based on satellite data, for a first-of-its-kind global view. While there are plenty of maps that show forest height regionally and locally, this is the first time it's been mapped globally with a single, uniform method.

    The new map shows the world’s tallest forests clustered in the Pacific Northwest of North America and portions of Southeast Asia, while shorter forests are found in broad swaths across northern Canada and Eurasia. The map depicts average height over 5 square kilometers (1.9 square miles) regions), not the maximum heights that any one tree or small patch of trees might attain.

    These heights range from 0 to 70 meters. The darker the green the higher the tree canopies.

    NASA believes the new map could help scientists with a new perspective on how much carbon forests store and more insight on carbon cycles within ecosystems.

    Click through to NASA for the high-res version.

    [via Boing Boing]

  • Investigation of top secret America

    July 20, 2010  |  Infographics

    Top Secret America network infographic

    In response to the the 9/11 attacks, the United States government created a highly secretive set of organizations with zero transparency and very little oversight. How much money do these secret programs cost? How many people do they employ? The Washington Post reports on Top Secret America:

    These are some of the findings of a two-year investigation by The Washington Post that discovered what amounts to an alternative geography of the United States, a Top Secret America hidden from public view and lacking in thorough oversight. After nine years of unprecedented spending and growth, the result is that the system put in place to keep the United States safe is so massive that its effectiveness is impossible to determine.

    The series of articles, video, and graphics, allow readers to explore the information themselves.

    Of main interest: a network diagram shows organizations and their top secret activities and a map shows the geographic distribution of government organizations and companies within Top Secret America.

    Click on a specific organization for within group breakdowns. At this point it gets a little confusing with drill-down pie charts, especially if you're just browsing, and a spiral view is also offerred which feels extraneous. The overall story and heavy research, however, makes it worth clicking through the clunky at times set of interactives.

    [Thanks, Erika]

  • Citizen’s guide to fancy pants coffee drinks

    July 19, 2010  |  Infographics

    ThePerfectPour-large

    In the same spirit of the original coffee drink infographic from a few years ago, Plaid Creative describes the perfect pour, or as I like to call it, the citizen's guide to fancy pants coffee drinks. At its root, its a series of pie charts where each wedge represents the percentage of ingredient in a given fancy pants drink. But the subtle stylings make it look so much more delicious, from the pattern fills out to the mug-like border.

    [via thisisnthappiness]

  • Maps that changed the world

    July 15, 2010  |  Mapping

    Be on guard russian map

    Peter Barber, head of Map Collections at the British Library reports for the The Daily Mail ten of the greatest maps that changed the world. The number one listed (above) is Be On Guard! from 1921:

    The infant USSR was threatened with invasion, famine and social unrest. To counter this, brilliant designers such as Dimitri Moor were employed to create pro-Bolshevik propaganda.

    Using a map of European Russia and its neighbours, Moor's image of a heroic Bolshevik guard defeating the invading 'Whites' helped define the Soviet Union in the Russian popular imagination.

    Others include Google Earth, Charles Booth's map of London poverty, and the earliest known Chinese terrestrial globe from 1623.

    [via @krees]

  • Path to happiness gets complicated and confusing

    July 14, 2010  |  Infographics

    Lifelong hapiness flowchart, extended

    Just when you thought the path to lifelong happiness was uber simple and you had it all figured out, someone slaps you in the face and complicates things. The nerve. [Thanks, Dustin]

  • Gapminder makes its way to the desktop

    July 13, 2010  |  Software, Statistical Visualization

    Gapminder Desktop

    You've seen the presentation. You've seen the motion graph tool. But up until now, the data exploration tool, Trendalyzer, has always been in the browser. Now you can download the desktop version, and keep everything on your own computer with Gapminder Desktop:

    Gapminder Desktop is particularly useful for presentations as it allows you to prepare your graphs in advance and you won’t need an Internet connection at your lecture or presentation.

    In the "list of graphs" you will get at preset list of graphs on the left side, but you can also very easily create your own favorite examples. Simply arrange the graph the way you want it and click “bookmark this graph”. Your example will the appear in your own list of favorite graphs. Perfect when you want to prepare a lecture or presentation.

    Basically, it's the exact same thing as the online version as an Adobe Air application, which is handy for all you motion graph fans out there.
    Continue Reading

  • How data travels from phone to computer

    July 13, 2010  |  Infographics

    How a file is transferred

    Time Warner Cable explains how a picture travels from Jeff's phone to Vijay's laptop. Obviously it is a bit simplified. I spent a full semester on step four alone back in my electrical engineering days, and still don't know what the heck happens there. That was a rough semester.

  • Flowchart to lifelong happiness

    July 9, 2010  |  Infographics

    Are you happy flowchart

    The secret to lifelong happiness. If only it were so easy. [Typcut via swissmiss]

  • Flowchart shows the startup business cycle

    July 8, 2010  |  Infographics

    HackFwd Blueprint

    Technology and investment group HackFwd describes what it's like to work with them in a flowchart. In a nutshell: start with inspiration, work hard, impress people, work hard, and reap the rewards. And then start all over again.

  • Augmented reality taken to the extreme

    July 8, 2010  |  Data Art

    Augmented (hyper)reality

    Augmented reality, a computer trick to place the virtual within the real world, has barely cracked its way into most of our lives, but it's easy to see how such a tool could get out of hand. At some point, we're going to have to raise our hands and say, "Okay, stop that's enough information. My head hurts." Or will we? Recent architecture grad Keiichi Matsuda explores the possibility of an augmented (hyper)reality where information is everywhere you go (video below). Continue Reading

  • How Britain has changed since 1997

    July 7, 2010  |  Statistical Visualization

    How Britain has changed in the past decade

    Prospect Magazine takes a look at how Britain has changed by the numbers from 1997 to present:

    Richer, fatter, living longer, more indebted, drunker, better connected, politically disillusioned: there’s no metric that can describe whether we are happier or living better lives after 13 years of Labour. But there are plenty to show how we have changed during a period of fulsome spending, borrowing and technological transformation.

    The four pages of graphics are well-organized with just the right balance of color and iconography, to keep the reader engaged without going oatmeal on the numbers.

  • JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit 2.0 released

    July 6, 2010  |  Software, Statistical Visualization

    the Jit treemap example

    Visualization in JavaScript is all the rage these days. Just a couple of years ago, this would've seemed ridiculous because the engines were too slow, but no more of that. To that end, Nicolas Garcia Belmonte just released his JavaScript InfoVis Toolkit 2.0. It's got your treemaps, stacked area charts, pie charts, weighted graph, so on and so forth. You can see all the demos, plus code examples to get the full picture.

    This is not dissimilar to Protovis from the Stanford visualization group. Although, I'm told the JIT is fully functioning in Internet Explorer. Protovis only partly works in IE right now.

  • Top World Cup players on Facebook

    July 5, 2010  |  Infographics

    World Cup on Facebook

    I always know when something exciting happens in the World Cup when my Facebook stream is flooded with announcements of a goooooooaaaal. On any given day, certain players are more talked about than others. The New York Times explores the day-to-day fluctuations of player mentions in Facebook status updates. Continue Reading

  • Geography of Lost island

    July 2, 2010  |  Mapping

    Geography of LOST

    GIS guy Jonah Adkins maps the geography of Lost (the tv series). It looks like I missed out on quite a bit. Unfortunately, I only got up to the point in the first season where they saw a dead person hanging in a tree. I could not deal with all the insane cliffhangers.

    I'm sure many of you were fans though, so you can stare at the maps for a while to temporarily fill the gaping hole in your life since the show ended.

    [via We Love Datavis]

  • Challenge: What is a FIFA player’s worth?

    July 2, 2010  |  Discussion, Infographics

    What is a player's worth?

    I really want to like this graphic on the "worth" of FIFA players. The colors pop and the topic is potentially interesting. There are some graphics 101 pitfalls going on here though. How can you make this display better? Leave your two cents in the comments below.

    [via We Love Datavis]

  • Mapping what your neighborhood used to look like

    July 1, 2010  |  Mapping

    Getting young and old to hang out

    In part of their initiative to get young and old people to hang out, We Are What We Do, in collaboration with Google, built Historypin. The map application invites people to upload their pictures and pin them in street view. The effort creates something of a digital time machine where old and young can find common ground.

    Obviously, the more people who use it, the more useful it becomes. There doesn't seem to be ton of pictures yet, so all you get is Google street view in a lot of places.

    It's easy to see the potential though. Just imagine being able to watch the evolution of your city, town, or neighborhood, like a block-specific museum with people's personal stories and old photos with modern context.

    [via infosthetics]

  • Who participates online, by age

    July 1, 2010  |  Infographics

    What people are doing online

    Arno Ghelfi for Businessweek reports on who's doing what online, separated by age. The grid aesthetic totally works for the Internet theme, which can feel robotic and bit-wise at times.

    From top to bottom are the more active users to the more passive. Age groups run left to right. So as we sweep top left to bottom right, we see the younger generation who is more likely to write blogs and upload videos to YouTube, to an older crowd who are more likely to be content consumers.

    Update: Doh, this is from 2007. This cross-country move is throwing me out of wack. Oh well, it's still an interesting piece of Internet history.

  • Modern history of human communication

    June 30, 2010  |  Infographics

    Modern History of Human Communication (infographic)

    With the announcement of Google Voice for everyone, the big G describes the history of human communication in the graphic above - and consequently, how Voice is the next step in the evolution. We begin with the tin cans in 1810, to the telephone in 1876, then the first email in 1971, and tada, we arrive at Google Voice in the present. Average international call cost per minute serves as the backdrop.

    I gotta get me one of those vintage mobile phones of 1979.

    [via]

Unless otherwise noted, graphics and words by me are licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC. Contact original authors for everything else.