Race and Origin in the United States, by State

Here is the breakdown for each state in the United States, based on estimates from the American Community Survey.

CHARTS

EXPLANATION. Each spiral represents the percentage of those who identify with the race or origin listed. Segment length is proportional to the percentage of each group, as it relates to the full length of the spiral.

WHITE

HISPANIC OR LATINO

SHOWING THE

BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN

RACE OR ORIGIN

ASIAN

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE

PERCENTAGES OF EACH STATE

NATIVE HAWAIIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER

Compiled using estimates from the American Community Survey 2018

United States

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

NOTE. Survey respondents are allowed to answer more than one race and can have Hispanic or Latino origin or not. For the sake of simplicity, the percentages shown for each race are for those who only selected a single race and are non-Hispanic. Hispanic or Latino is then shown separately for comparison.

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

CHARTS

SHOWING THE

RACE OR ORIGIN

PERCENTAGES OF EACH STATE

Compiled using estimates from the American Community Survey 2018

WHITE

HISPANIC OR LATINO

BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN

ASIAN

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE

NATIVE HAWAIIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER

US

AL

AK

AZ

AR

CA

CO

CT

DE

DC

FL

GA

HI

ID

IL

IN

IA

KS

KY

LA

ME

MD

MA

MI

MN

MS

MO

MT

NE

NV

NH

NJ

NM

NY

NC

ND

OH

OK

OR

PA

RI

SC

SD

TN

TX

UT

VT

VA

WA

WV

WI

WY

EXPLANATION. Each spiral represents the percentage of those who identify with the race or origin listed. Segment length is proportional to the percentage of each group, as it relates to the full length of the spiral.

 

NOTE. Survey respondents are allowed to answer more than one race and can have Hispanic or Latino origin or not. For the sake of simplicity, the percentages shown for each race are for those who only selected a single race and are non-Hispanic. Hispanic or Latino is then shown separately for comparison.

Looking at percentages is a little tricky, because respondents can answer more than one race and whether or not they have Hispanic or Latino origins. So for simplicity, these charts represent those who answered one race or said they had Hispanic origins.

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