• Watch TED Talks in Sphere Form – TEDSphere

    June 2, 2008  |  Data Art

    The Bestiario design group seems to have been busy lately. Their latest project, TEDSphere, unsurprisingly, places the ever-so-popular TED talks series in a spherical space. You can watch TED talks from both inside and outside of the sphere, which is pretty cool.

    inside tedsphere

    Talks are connected with lines to show relationships between lectures. Originally, I thought relationships were talks with similar tags, but I clicked around, and that doesn't seem to be case, so I'm not immediately sure.

    Similar Look and Feel

    TEDSphere has a similar look and feel to Bestiario's previous works with the 3D browsing and connections, which is nice and often provides smooth browsing experience. Although I wish the 3D environment could be rendered a bit more smoothly. Edges and connecting lines always look so coarse. It's probably a limitation of the Flash environment, but if that could be accomplished, these 3D projects could look that much better and feel less alpha.

  • What Are Your Favorite Data Visualizations in Recent Memory?

    May 30, 2008  |  Discussion, Visualization

    It's time for a reader discussion, open thread, etc. Today's question is:

    What are your favorite data visualizations in recent memory?

    It can be something I've posted or it can be something I missed. To get your memory going, you might want to go through the archives. Are there any visualizations that made you stop and go wow?

  • Find Your Dream Home (or Fantasize) With Trulia Snapshot

    May 29, 2008  |  Mapping

    Trulia, the real estate search site, launched Trulia Snapshot today in collaboration with Stamen Design. It's a pretty mapping interface that lets you view pictures of properties on a map in a very interactive way i.e. it's fun to use and super fluid.

    First, you type a location you want to find properties at.

    First page

    From there you can browse properties by newest/oldest or most/least expensive with the map or with the histogram at the bottom.

    Full UI

    Select Property

    If you just want to sit back and watch, press play and the real estate properties will highlight automatically by the order you've selected, and the map will move back and forth by location. See something you like? Press pause. If not, just let the animations keep running - your own personal real estate agent.

    My favorite part of the visualization is how the bottom images blur as you whiz by. It's a very small part and not the focal point, but it's one of those little design things that make it that much better. Nice touch.

    Ultimately, success of such work is measured by (although it shouldn't need be) whether or not users would rather browse data with the visualization or with the usual listing pages. Give it a try - what would you rather use?

  • Flickr Tags and Pictures as a Universe – Tag Galaxy

    May 29, 2008  |  Data Art

    Steven Wood's thesis project, Tag Galaxy is a beautiful piece of work to visualize Flickr tags and pictures. Type whatever tag you want, and the results are organized with your tag as the sun and related tags as orbiting planets. Rotate and browse the galaxy to view pictures with the corresponding tag. Above was the result that I got after inputting "visualization".
    Continue Reading

  • 5 Data Visualization Dissertations Worth a Look

    May 23, 2008  |  Visualization

    It's coming to the end of the academic year, which means there are lots of graduate students frantically finishing up their dissertations, defending, and earning their degrees (yay!). Here are some tasty visualization dissertations, new and old, worth thumbing through.

    Information Visualization for the People
    Information Visualization for the People by Mike Danziger, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Comparative Media Studies

    Form of Facts and Figures
    The Form of Facts and Figures by Christian Behrens, Potsdam University of Applied Sciences, Interface Design

    Practical Tools for Exploring Data and Models
    Practical Tools for Exploring Data and Models by Hadley Wickham, Iowa State University, Department of Statistics

    Visual Tools for the Socio–semantic Web
    Visual Tools for the Socio–semantic Web by Moritz Stefaner, Potsdam University of Applied Sciences, Interface Design

    Computational Information Design
    Computational Information Design by Ben Fry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Arts and Sciences

  • Measuring Informational Distance Between Cities

    May 22, 2008  |  Mapping

    Bestiario, the group behind 6pli, recently put up their piece that maps informational distance between cities. At the base is a freely rotating globe. Arcs, whose strength and height represent strength of relationship, connect cities. The metric to determine strength of relationship takes several contexts into account - Google searches for individual cities, cities together, and geographical proximity. Bestiario implemented the piece in actionscript and used their own 3d framework (in Spanish).

    [Thanks, Santiago]

  • Tracking Manny Ramirez’s Hunt for 500 Homers

    May 16, 2008  |  Infographics

    homerun

    The Boston Globe lets readers explore home run data for the Boston Red Sox left fielder Manny Ramirez. The data is quite detailed and the graphic lets your split the data in several directions. Look at homers by ballpark, who was pitching, the pitch count, when Ramirez homered, and where the ball landed. Baseball fans will really appreciate this interactive graphic and non-baseball fans will probably find it interesting too.

  • Quickie Visualizations for Debugging

    May 15, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization

    This guest post is by Rahul Bhargava, a Senior Software Engineer at nTAG Interactive, makers of interactive name badges for conferences and meetings. Email him : rahul [ @ ] ntag . com

    A common thread in many of the great visualizations Nathan shares on Flowing Data is that they are created for external consumption - someone designs a neat way to represent a dataset to a larger, naive audience. I want to talk about the under appreciated utility of writing quick visualizations for yourself, to help you debug your own complicated or data-dense problems. This is not a new discussion, but I want to remind all the programmers out there that a speedily-created visual representation of your debugging log data might be the quickest way to find your problem! Below are some examples of what we've done at nTAG, and some techniques we've found particularly useful. Please post a comment about what you do.
    Continue Reading

  • Why Isn’t Data Visualization More Popular?

    May 14, 2008  |  Visualization

    Todd provides 5 reasons why data visualization isn't more prevalent:

    1. People don't know what data visualization is.
    2. Bad visualization has skewed perception of what data visualization is and what it can be used for.
    3. People can't interpret charts or new data representations.
    4. Visualization is difficult to create, but easy to copy.
    5. People won't pay for visualization.

    While all the reasons do have some truth, there are a couple things worth adding.

    People Do Know What Data Visualization Is

    People have some kind of idea of what data is and know that you can get information out of it somehow. Maybe it's with a graph or it could be with something more elaborate, but most people will get it. They know what data visualization is. They just don't know what it's called. In other words, they know. They just don't know they know.

    People Will Pay (A Lot) for Visualization

    With all the data out there and the constantly increasing volumes of it, more people want to understand without having to learn formal statistical methods. How can they understand it? Visualization of course. The growing number of examples I've covered here on FlowingData show that there is a growing demand. After all, a lot of stuff I've covered here was commissioned.

    Not Too Worried

    Anyways, even though not everyone knows about data visualization (yet), I'm not too worried about it. There's just too much data for people not to care... or am I wasting my time? No. If they don't care, we'll show them why they should.

  • Flocking Up the National Nine News

    May 13, 2008  |  Infographics

    At the bottom of each article on National Nine News (Australian MSN), there's a button to "Flock It!" which is like favorit-ing a news story.

    Flock Button

    Flock ItThe more people who flock a story, the higher up the flock list the story goes. In the sidebar of each story is an interactive graphic that shows readers flocking around the news and stories getting highlighted. The larger the bubble, the more people who have flocked it; story bubbles light up orange when someone flocks it. The site isn't showing any larger sizes, but a full screen version could be fun. Maybe a screensaver.

    MSN seems to have have this whole news exploration thing going on lately. I like it.

    [Thanks, Andrew]

  • Mapping the Human Diseasome With a Network Graph

    May 9, 2008  |  Infographics

    diseasome

    Matthew Block and Jonathan Corum from The New York Times use a network graph to map diseases and the genes they have in common. Color indicates the type of disease, circles represent diseases, and gray squares are genes that the diseases have in common. The graphic has a nice magnifying glass zooming feature, so that you too can be a biologist.

  • NewsWare Launches to Explore and Interact with News on msnbc.com

    May 6, 2008  |  Infographics

    NewsWare was launched yesterday on msnbc.com. It's a set of apps, games, and widgets to interact with the news. The three main points of interest are the Spectra (pictured above) and two games that resemble a couple of popular arcade games infused with news.
    Continue Reading

  • American Consumers Spend More Money On Cheese than On Computers

    May 5, 2008  |  Infographics

    consumer-spending

    In a deviation from the usual pie chart and standard tree map, this graphic from The New York Times resembles something of a stained glass window - a really pretty piece of work. Amanda Cox, with Matthew Bloch and Shan Carter, designed the interactive graphic that lets you explore how American consumers spend their money.
    Continue Reading

  • Love, Hate, Think, Believe, Feel and Wish on Twitter

    April 30, 2008  |  Data Art

    Inspired by Jonathan Harris and Sep Kamvar's We Feel Fine, and using data from summize, twistori shows what people love, hate, think, believe, feel, and wish for on Twitter. Given the conversational feel of Twitter, twistori shows an almost natural flow of emotion and like Twittervision, is sort of mesmerizing.

    [via Twitter]

  • All 26 Million Road Segments in Continental United States

    April 28, 2008  |  Mapping

    road-map

    Ben Fry maps every road segment in All Streets, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER/Line data. There's no actual map or drawn borders; instead Ben chooses to let the data do all the work, and the results are very pretty. Sometimes you don't need a map to map.

    I was somewhat surprised to see California's low road density compared to the eastern half of the country, but I guess that's because of all the freeways. What's more surprising though is that line down the middle. Roads all of a sudden go dense somewhere around North Dakota. Is that really what it's like? Does farming suddenly stop and urban life begins in these areas?

    Poor Alaska and Hawaii, with too few roads, were left out.

  • Poverty Statistics that Make Sense – Welcome to Povertyville and Slumtown

    April 25, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization

    Dan Beech represents worldwide poverty in this video, which is actually a 3-dimensional bar chart with some flare:

    Welcome to Povertyville, Slumtown, and Low Income city. I'm not sure what to think. Should I laugh? Should I cry? I don't know. What do you think?

    In this genre of over-produced graphs, Povertyville reminds me of the real estate roller coaster, a dramatic 3-D time series plot:

  • Rolling Out Your Own Online Maps and Graphs with HTML/CSS

    April 24, 2008  |  Mapping, Statistical Visualization

    Wilson Miner and Paul Smith, two co-founders of Everyblock, post tutorials and a little bit of their own experiences rolling out their own maps and creating graphs with web standards.

    Why Not Go With Google Maps?

    Paul gets into the mechanics of how you can use your own maps discussing the map stack - browser UI, tile cache, map server, and finally, the data. My favorite part though was his reasons for going with their own maps:

    Ask yourself this question: why would you, as a website developer who controls all aspects of your site, from typography to layout, to color palette to photography, to UI functionality, allow a big, alien blob to be plopped down in the middle of your otherwise meticulously designed application? Think about it. You accept whatever colors, fonts, and map layers Google chooses for their map tiles. Sure, you try to rein it back in with custom markers and overlays, but at the root, the core component—the map itself—is out of your hands.

    Because it's so easy to put in Google Maps instead of make your own (although it is getting a little easier), everything starts to look and feel the same and we get stuck in this Google Maps-confined interaction funk. Don't get me wrong. Google Maps does have its uses and it is a great application. I look up directions with it all the time, but we should also keep in mind that there's more to mapping than bubble markers all in the color of the Google flag.

    Remember: a little bit of design goes a long way.

    Data Visualization with Web Standards

    Wilson provides a tutorial for horizontal bar charts and sparklines with nothing but HTML and CSS. Why would you want to do this when you could use some fancy graphing API? Using Everyblock as an example, data visualization can serve as part of a navigation system as opposed to a standalone graphic:

    Everyblock Graphs

    Sometimes the visualization isn't at the center of attention.

    Make sure you check out Everyblock, a site that is all about the data in your very own neighborhood, to see these maps and graphs in action.

    [Thanks, Jodi]

  • Showing the Obama-Clinton Divide in Decision Tree Infographic

    April 23, 2008  |  Infographics

    Amanda Cox, of The New York Times, made another excellent graphic (and I wouldn't expect anything less). We see an entire story between Obama and Clinton - positions taken, counties won, and counties lost. Go ahead and take a look. Words bad. Picture good. Ooga. Booga.

    [via Infographics News]

  • Hierarchical Glossary as Interactive Network Graphs

    April 22, 2008  |  Visualization

    Moritz has been working on visualization of a hierarchical glossary carefully named "Glossary Visualization" versions 2-5. Not sure where version 1 is. Being a network graph, I can see this getting chaotic when there are more words (or categories) involved, but then again, maybe that's all the words. In either case, it beats browsing through words in a dictionary; although, these prototypes don't include definitions yet.

    In the most recent version, words are represented as a DOI tree showing only the categories. Click on a category and view the sub-categories.

    glossary visualization

    All four versions were implemented using the recently-mentioned Flare visualization toolkit.

    What do you think - cluttered or just right?

  • Facebook Lexicon – Trends for Writings on the Wall

    April 17, 2008  |  Network Visualization

    Facebook recently released Lexicon which is like a Google Trends or Technorati for wall posts. Type in a word or a group of words, and you can see the buzz for those terms in a time series plot. Daniel sent me this excellent example. Type in party tonight, hangover and you'll get the above graph. Notice the Saturday spikes for party tonight and the Sunday spikes for hangover? Here's another one for finals:

    Facebook Lexicon

    It's interesting to see what people are talking about, and being Facebook walls, there's this realness to the charts (or maybe that's just me).

    Go ahead. Give Lexicon a try. What interesting queries can you find?

    P.S. You have to be logged in to use it.

    [Thanks, Daniel]

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