• Exploration of Our Presidents’ First 100 Days in Office

    November 11, 2008  |  Infographics

    GOOD Magazine and Atley Kasky collaborate to explore U.S. Presidents' first 100 days in office.

    I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people," Franklin D. Roosevelt told supporters in 1932 while accepting the presidential nomination. When he took office the following year, he spent his first 100 days enacting a dizzying number of reforms designed to stabilize an economically depressed nation. Since then, a president's first 100 days have been an indicator of what he is able to accomplish. In January 2009, the clock starts again.

    For each President, going back to FDR, a line represents his first 100 days in office. Each circle corresponds to a significant event. The profiles underneath the timelines start with a notable quote from the President's inauguration speech (except Truman and Johnson, who were sworn in after the death of Roosevelt and Kennedy, respectively) followed by events marked with cute, little icons that show what type of event it was. The % of popular vote, days in office, and political inheritance are there too.

    Yeah, it's a crud load of information (presented quite nicely). I hope you have a big monitor.

    [Thanks, @hungryclone]

  • Maps and Cartograms of 2008 Presidential Election

    November 10, 2008  |  Mapping

    Cartograms got a lot of coverage in 2004 when Michael Gastner, Cosma Shalizi, and Mark Newman used them to show the Bush/Kerry election results. Naturally, they've put together a similar series of (very red) maps and cartograms for the just past 2008 election.

    In case you're unfamiliar with cartograms, they're essentially maps with morphed areas according to some metric. The election series for example are adjusted for population, so that states are sized by population instead of physical area. The drawback of course is that after a certain point, the image starts to look a lot like a Pollock painting.

    [Thanks, Sara]

  • Diagrams Galore in Diagram Diaries Flickr Group

    November 7, 2008  |  Infographics

    diagram-diaries

    For those watching the clock and waiting for the weekend to hurry up and start, here's the Diagram Diaries Flickr group. The 654 diagrams should keep you occupied for a good while. Enjoy, and have a good weekend, everyone.

  • Sprint Dashboard to the Universe – Plug Into Now

    November 6, 2008  |  Infographics

    Sprint, in a promotion to their mobile Internet service, created this amusing futuristic dashboard. "All aboard the now machine," the computer says. "How about a big bowl of now?... Please keep your hands inside the moment...your hair has grown 5 millionths of centimeter in the last second." It's got tickers for eggs being produced, emails being sent, spam emails being received, recent news from The New York Times, CNN, newsvine, top Google searches of the day, and most importantly, seconds until doughnut day. That'd be a nice little screensaver - or something I'd have running 24/7 on a giant plasma.

    Oh, and yes, that is my face in the middle.

  • Obama and McCain Voters’ Current State of Mind

    November 4, 2008  |  Infographics

    state-of-mind-2

    The New York Times adds another item to the list of things to watch tonight as election results start to pour in. The Times invites readers to enter one word that describes their current state of mind and who they support. You are allowed to enter a word once per hour. The result is the above self-updating word cloud as new words from readers flow from left to right. You can filter among McCain supporters, Obama supporters, or everyone. McCain supporters appear to be worried, scared, and nervous while Obama supporters are excited, hopeful, and optimistic. Both sides are anxious. What's your current state of mind?

  • Google Visualization API Opens Up

    When Google first launched their visualization API, you could only use data that was in Google spreadsheets, which was pretty limiting. Yesterday, Google opened this up, and you can now hook in data from wherever you want. What does that mean? It means that developers now have access to all the visualization API offerings like before, but it's now a lot easier to hook visualization into data applications.

    Headed for Googley Waters

    It also means we're about to see a boom in web applications that look very Googley. Motion charts (above) are going to spread like wildfire and ugly gauges will grace us with their presence. It'll be similar to the Google Maps craze, but not quite as rampant. In a couple months from now, I will have a long list of online places that use the Google visualization API. It's going to be interesting where online visualization goes from here.

    Going back to my original question, to what extent do you think the now-open Google Visualization API will affect visualization on the Web?

    [via ReadWriteWeb]

  • Showing This Many Per Second – Data Humanized

    November 3, 2008  |  Data Art

    I've always thought one of the best ways to make data relate-able is to humanize it. Wouter Walmink, from studio:ludens, does this quite literally in so_many_a_second. I'm sure you've across statistics that state something like "this many people die of this condition per second in the world," but that number, even though it's a rate - something that is dynamic, feels very static.

    In so_many_a_second these rates are represented by objects in an attempt to show these types of numbers on a "human scale." The above shows number of plastic cups used by airlines per second. Oh yes, it's raining cups.

    Depicting the ongoing stream of events, this application tries to get the user in touch with the emotional actuality of these objective data.

    The concept itself isn't anything new. We've seen stuff sort of like this before (e.g. Running the Numbers: An American Portrait, Google employee count), but the novel thing with so_many_a_second is that you can create your own flows and compare them side-by-side. It's more than just a literal representation of numbers.

    Yes, we could efficiently place all the rates in a horizontal bar graph, but somehow, so_many_a_second makes me care more.

    [via infosthetics | Thanks, Tim]

  • European Economic Weather Map – Sudden Change in Outlook

    October 31, 2008  |  Economics, Mapping

    In this map from the Financial Times, the state of Europe's economy is shown like a weather map. A cloud with a lightning bolt represents a "sudden change in outlook, outlook uncertain." There's nothing but gray skies ahead, I'm afraid. Oh, but wait, what's that? Cyprus has some sun peaking out over the cloud: "Clouds over growth with some sunny prospects." There is hope.

    [via The Big Picture | Thanks, Michael]

  • Map Shows Newspaper Endorsements in US Presidential Election

    October 29, 2008  |  Mapping

    newspapers

    Philip, from infochimps, maps newspaper endorsements using data from the Editor & Publisher's list. Circles with the blue radial gradient are newspapers that endorse Obama and John Kerry in 2004 while the red ones show McCain/Bush endorsements. The lighter blue circles are newspapers that endorse Obama, but actually endorsed George Bush in 2004. It's a similar encoding for the John McCain endorsements except in red and the flip being John Kerry. Circle size is newspaper's circulation.

    The only thing I found a little weird was that the Dem to Rep or Rep to Dem endorsements were represented with all blue or all red. It certainly makes the circles stand out - which was the point - but doesn't really indicate a flip. I had to mouse over the circle to find that out.

    [via FlowingData Forums | Thanks, mrflip]

  • More Google Reader Stats When ‘show details’

    October 28, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization

    I just noticed that when you click on "show details" in Google Reader, you get a graph of how frequently posts come from that feed and how often you read those posts. It used to only show subscriber count (via Google Reader) and when the feed was last updated. It's one of those things where it's like "so... what" and it won't influence any of the decisions I make in life in any way, but hopefully when all of you "show details" for FlowingData all the red and blue bars are aligned :).

    P.S. Greetings from Chicago. It is much too early in the morning.

  • A Bunch of Japanese Women’s Bra Responses

    October 27, 2008  |  Data Art

    Uniqlo gathered hundreds of responses from a couple hundred Japanese women about bra size, makeup, and shopping and put it into this sort of 3-d world of short video clips. Questions appear at the top, you get a few random video responses, and then the animation zooms out to show you the rundown. I can't say I know what exactly is going on since I don't know Japanese, but I'm guessing... bra commercial? OK, yeah, I have no idea.
    Continue Reading

  • Who’s Leading Whom? Predictive Markets Versus Polls

    October 22, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization, Statistics

    This is a guest post from Michael Drumheller, Dirk Karis, Raif Majeed and Robert Morton of Tableau Software. They use Tableau to explore the relationship between polls and predictive markets.

    Predictive markets such as Intrade and the Iowa Electronic Markets have attracted more attention this year than in past Presidential elections. Some political observers such as ElectoralMap.net look to these markets as indicators of who's winning or losing.
    Continue Reading

  • Comparative View of Length of Rivers and Height of Mountains

    October 17, 2008  |  Infographics

    I had no idea these comparative views of length of rivers and heights of mountains were so popular - at least in the 1800s. There seemed to be a fascination with placing rivers and mountains next to each other when normally, we're used to seeing them intertwined in a geographic landscape. The above is actually just river lengths, but here's one that places rivers and mountains next to each other.
    Continue Reading

  • United States Poverty Rates From 1980 to 2007

    October 15, 2008  |  Mapping, Projects

    Thousands of bloggers are taking the time to discuss a single topic today - poverty. As we sit in our cozy homes, go out to eat, watch movies, or simply read the news on a computer, it's easy to forget that there are millions of people around the world who aren't so well off. Blog Action Day is an opportunity to remember and to perhaps help out in some way.

    Mapping Poverty Rates

    I of course took the visualization route. What better way to get the facts than through data? The US Census Bureau provides lots of poverty estimates, so I took their data and mapped it over the last 27 years. I found it alarming to see that some states had a poverty rate over 20%. I clearly live in a cozy bubble. What does your state look like?

  • Visualizing YouTube, Blogs, Twitter, Flickr, People…

    October 14, 2008  |  Network Visualization

    From the guys who brought you 6pli and other like-minded network visualization tools, Bestiario takes 6pli to the next level. 6pli lets users explore their del.icio.us bookmarks. This work, in collaboration with Harvard Berkaman, also lets users explore their del.icio.us bookmarks - as well as YouTube videos, Flickr photos, Twitter tweets, and content from Wikipedia, blogs, and other places. Items are clustered by content type and meta information. Yes, it's a whole lot of stuff in one place.

    The main idea is to take a few steps away from the list and scroll paradigm - sort of like DoodleBuzz, but from a more analytical standpoint. Does it make all those personal streams easier to browse and explore than something like FriendFeed? You be the judge.

    [Thanks, Jose]

  • Browse Political Bias on Memeorandum – Greasemonkey Script

    October 13, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization

    Memeorandum shows up-to-date posts from leading political bloggers, and it is well-known that political bloggers are often very partisan. It's not always obvious to new readers though which side of the line a blogger sits on. You certainly can't always tell just from a headline on Memeorandum. So Andy Baio, with the help of del.icio.us founder, Joshua Schachter, created a Greasemonkey script (and Firefox plugin) to do just that. Simply install the script and browse popular political articles by their bias.

    With the help of del.icio.us founder Joshua Schachter, we used a recommendation algorithm to score every blog on Memeorandum based on their linking activity in the last three months. Then I wrote a Greasemonkey script to pull that information out of Google Spreadsheets, and colorize Memeorandum on-the-fly. Left-leaning blogs are blue and right-leaning blogs are red, with darker colors representing strong biases.

    Just a quick glance at Memeorandum with the plugin installed shows the magic works.

    How it Was Done

    Of course this isn't just magic. It's not human-powered. It's a data-driven algorithm. It's statistics. The data are the articles that the Memeorandum-listed blogs link to, so just imagine a giant matrix with number of links. They then use singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce that matrix to one dimension which they use to estimate where on the political spectrum any given blog on Memeorandum sits.

    All you statistics readers (and maybe some of the computer scientists) should be familiar with SVD. I learned about it and played with it quite a bit during my first year in graduate school. Anyways, it's cool to see statistics at work and how it can be useful in visualization. A lot of the time visualization projects are about getting all the data on the screen, but with a little bit of know-how (or help from someone who has it) you can produce projects that let the computer do a lot of the pattern-finding work and don't make the user work so hard.

    By the way, Andy's blog Waxy has become one of my favorite blogs as of late, so if political bias isn't your thing, I'd still encourage you to go check it out.

  • Daily Design Workout – DONE by Jonas Buntenbruch

    October 9, 2008  |  Data Art

    DONE is a sketching project by Jonas Buntenbruch. He takes 30-60 minutes per day and puts his design skills to work. He began at the beginning of this year on January 1 and has produced a sketch/design for every day so far.

    Some of his work is charts and graphs, but most are of the typography, cartoon, and icon variety. Nevertheless, it's a great way to hone the design skills. You learn what works, what doesn't work, and skills that need sharpening. Learn by doing has always been my philosophy - mostly because I suck at learning by listening, writing, and reading. Seriously. I took a learning test in fourth grade that told me so.

    Can someone please do a data visualization per day? Don't forget to make it awesome.

    [Thanks, Adam]

  • Commercial Air Traffic Seen Around the World

    October 8, 2008  |  Mapping

    Commercial air traffic

    This computer simulation (video below) by Zhaw shows worldwide commercial flights over a 24-hour period. It's been making the blog rounds lately. Watch as flights start in the morning in the western hemisphere, and as the sun starts to come up in the east, more flights begin in the east. I'm not sure if we're seeing actual GPS traces or just interpolated flight paths from point-to-point data, but my guess is the latter. Does anyone understand the language on Zhaw?
    Continue Reading

  • May the Tallest and Fattest Win the Presidency

    October 7, 2008  |  Infographics

    taller

    OPEN N.Y. put together an amusing (and informative) graphic for a New York Times op-chart. It shows the height and weight of presidential candidates dating back to 1896 when William McKinley, weighing in at 5 feet 7 inches, won the election to become 25th president of the United States. The tall lead 17-8 and the heaver lead 18-8. William J. Bryan didn't stand a chance. Will Barack Obama add to the big and tall's lead or will John McCain win one for the little guy?

    [Thanks, Tom]

  • Maps for Advocacy – Beginner’s Guide to Mapping

    October 2, 2008  |  Mapping

    In a follow up to Visualizing Information for Advocacy, the Tactical Technology Collective recently announced Maps for Advocacy: An Introduction to Geographical Mapping Techniques.

    The booklet is an effective guide to using maps in advocacy. The mapping process for advocacy is explained vividly through case studies, descriptions of procedures and methods, a review of data sources as well as a glossary of mapping terminology. Scattered through the booklet are links to websites which afford a glance at a few prolific mapping efforts.

    While the example maps look very Googley and won't impress too many in the online mapping world, there are still some good links in there for data resources, terminology, and how maps play a role in displaying information.

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