NBA Players Traded, Historical Percentages

It seems like there’s been more player movement than usual over the years. LeBron James left Cleveland. Kevin Durant left OKC. James Harden wants out of Houston. Didn’t players used to play on a single team for the entirety of their careers?

No. But the percentage of players still on the team they played with their first season has been decreasing.

The chart below shows the percentage of players still playing for their original team and those on a different team each season.

 
The percentages are based on career stats from the NBA and only include players who played at least two seasons.

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