Computed screen time for men and women

Posted to Visualization  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

In a collaborative effort, the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media computed screen time for men and women algorithmically, in contrast to the more crude measurement of script lines. Key findings:

Male characters received two times the amount of screen time as female characters in 2015 (28.5% compared to 16.0%).

When a film has a male lead, this gender gap is even wider, with male characters appearing on screen nearly three times more often than female characters (34.5% compared to 12.9%).

In films with a female lead, male characters appear about the same amount of time as female characters (24.0% compared to 22.6%). This means that even when women are featured in a leading role, male characters appear on screen just as often.

Interesting work here. I just wish they included movie names in their charts. It would’ve provided a better connection to the data.

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