• GOOD Magazine’s Infographics Now Archived on Flickr

    June 3, 2009  |  Infographics

    You know all those infographics that you like so much from GOOD Magazine? Well they're all in one place now in their Flickr archive. Head on over to view all 80.

    [Thanks, Amrit]

  • Possible Futures of Twitter Visualized

    June 2, 2009  |  Infographics

    We all know Twitter has taken on a life of its own. With the very open API, Twitter allows developers to create countless applications on top of the service, and the sheer number of users has opened up opportunities in the area of real-time search. Needless to say, Twitter has a lot of opportunities worth considering, and it's possible the service could look very different a year from now (underneath the frontend) as more people adopt and bubbling acquisition rumors perhaps come to fruition. The below flow chart from Steve Rubel shows Twitter's possible future while the above from Brian Solis and Jess3 shows all the spawns of Twitter data.
    Continue Reading

  • Déjà Poo: Turning Wastewater to Nonpotable Water

    June 2, 2009  |  Infographics

    This infographic from Wired explains how Living Machines work to combine waste management and a garden in an office lobby. Honestly, I'm posting this for one reason only. The title is Déjà Poo. Brilliant. Yes. I am that immature.

    This infographic from Wired explains how Living Machines work to combine waste management and a garden in an office lobby. Honestly, I'm posting this for one reason only. The title is Déjà Poo. Brilliant. Yes. I am that immature.

    [via Graphic Sociology]

  • 11 Informative (and Fun) Infographics About Beer

    May 29, 2009  |  Infographics

    It's Friday. It's summer. It's time to relax in the backyard with an ice cold beer in hand. As you consume your beverage, here are 11 infographics about your beer, because the more you know, the more you enjoy. To start things off is a full history of beer (above). Continue Reading

  • Google Analytics Data Made More Informative

    May 28, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    goal-tracking

    A large majority of us who have websites use Google Analytics as our traffic monitor, and why not? It's free, it works, and it provides loads of data on traffic, referrals, and our content. We can then make decisions based on that data, but the trouble is there's a fair amount of clicking before we get to the good stuff. Enter Dshbrd by DabbleDB. Yes, that's dashboard with no vowels.

    Taking the Guesswork Out of Analytics

    The DabbleDB folks know data, and Dshbrd is no exception. Using data from your Google Analytics account, Dshbrd analyzes and finds the points of interest - and then shows them to you in a clear and concise way. I've grown incredibly tired of overused sparklines, but Dshbrd uses them well to show traffic trends alongside a vertical stacked area chart. The two are linked such that when you scroll over an event (e.g. rise in referrals from Digg), the area on the stacked chart highlights and vice versa.

    View traffic from site referrals, search engines, and direct links or content popularity, etc. Basically, you can examine all of your analytics data in Dshbrd that you can in Google Analytics but in this new view. It might take a second to get used to time on the vertical axis, but once you get over that, this alternative interface is quite intuitive and more importantly, very useful.

    Now if only DabbleDB would provide a reliable API I would be very happy.

    Premium Analytics

    Ultimately, I'm guessing DabbleDB would want to turn Dshbrd into a fee-based service if it gained enough traction. I personally wouldn't pay for it since I really don't need that much outside the usual Google view, but I could see how Dshbrd could be useful to others. What do you think? Would you pay for this sort of premium view into your Google Analytics data?

  • Worldwide Obama Buzz Visualized

    May 26, 2009  |  Mapping

    In celebration of Barack Obama's 100th day as the 44th President of the United States, the MIT SENSEable City Lab visualized mobile phone activity during the historic inauguration. What we see is a sense of the worldwide celebration and when and where people traveled to Washington, D.C. to get to the event. They call it Obama | One People. Continue Reading

  • Open Source Data Visualization Framework – Axiis

    May 22, 2009  |  Software, Statistical Visualization

    axiis

    Axiis, an open source data visualization framework in Flex, was released a few days ago under an MIT license. I haven't done much in Flex, but from what I hear, it's relatively easy to pick up. You get a lot of bang out of a few lines of code. Axiis makes things even easier, and provides visualization outside the built in Flex graph packages. Continue Reading

  • Indieprojector Makes it Easy to Map Your Geographical Data

    May 21, 2009  |  Mapping, Online Applications

    Axis Maps recently released indieprojector, a new component to indiemapper, their in-development mapping project to "bring traditional cartography into the 21st century." Indieprojector lets you import KML and shapefiles and easily reproject your data into a selection of popular map projections. No longer do you have to live within the bounds of a map that makes Greenland look the same size as Africa. Continue Reading

  • Death Penalty Laws Around the World

    May 15, 2009  |  Mapping

    With their usual flare, GOOD Magazine maps the death penalty around the world according to Amnesty International. Here we see that the philosophy varies quite a bit from country to country; however, most countries have either abolished the death penalty or only use it in exceptional cases. The death penalty is still in use in about 30 percent of countries. Like the map of drinking age though, I suspect laws vary within the countries. Continue Reading

  • Pixel City: Computer-generated City

    May 14, 2009  |  Data Art

    Pixel City is a procedurally-generated city by Shamus Young. For the non-coders out there, this essentially means that based on a certain set of rules, this 3-D city is generated dynamically each time the program runs. Here, the video that shows the Young's process will make it more clear:

    Check out the very detailed 10-part explanation for more on how Pixel City was built. Hopefully more comes out of it than just a screensaver. If it does become a screensaver though, I'd gladly use it.

  • Bubbles Galore in Analysis of Banks’ Financial Health

    May 13, 2009  |  Infographics

    Andrew Garcia Phillips and Stephen Grocer of The Wall Street Journal compare the financial health of 19 major banks according to recent government stress tests. Each row represents a metric, each bubble represents a bank, and the size of a bubble represents the value of a metric for that bank. Roll over bubbles for more information or select a specific bank in the left sidebar. I know a lot of you don't like bubbles in your viz, but this one works for me.

    [Thanks, Vikram]

  • Maps of the Seven Deadly Sins

    May 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    Geographers from Kansas State University map the spatial distribution of the seven deadly sins in the United States. These types of maps are always kind of iffy as they draw from data from various sources gathered with different methods and usually use some kind of researcher-defined metric. Still interesting though... right?
    Continue Reading

  • 50 Cars to Make One Bus?

    May 11, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    Flygbussarna, a Swedish coach bus company, in partnership with the Acne marketing group, assembled 50 cars into one bus to highlight the production of carbon emissions. Assuming slightly more than one person per car on average, one coach bus could potentially replace 50 cars on the road and reduce carbon emissions some 10 times over. Continue Reading

  • Interaction Design Pilot Year Churns Out Great Student Projects

    May 8, 2009  |  Visualization

    In a collaborative initiative between Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design and The Danish Design School, the Interaction Design Pilot Year brings together students and faculty from various disciplines for a unique brand of education. Continue Reading

  • 37 Data-ish Blogs You Should Know About

    May 6, 2009  |  Statistics, Visualization

    You might not know it, but there are actually a ton of data and visualization blogs out there. I'm a bit of a feed addict subscribing to just about anything with a chart or a mention of statistics on it (and naturally have to do some feed-cleaning every now and then). In a follow up to my short list last year, here are the data-ish blogs, some old and some new, that continue to post interesting stuff. Continue Reading

  • Here & There: Horizonless Perspective of Manhattan

    May 5, 2009  |  Mapping

    Jack Schulze provides this horizonless view of Manhattan:

    Here & There is a project by S&W exploring speculative projections of dense cities. These maps of Manhattan look uptown from 3rd and 7th, and downtown from 3rd and 35th. They're intended to be seen at those same places, putting the viewer simultaneously above the city and in it where she stands, both looking down and looking forward.

    Imagine a person standing at a street corner. The projection begins with a three-dimensional representation of the immediate environment. Close buildings are represented normally, and the viewer himself is shown in the third person, exactly where she stands.

    It takes a minute to wrap your head around the concept, but it's an interesting one. It bet it'd be especially awesome if it were an interactive map that you could use while you roamed around a dense city. What do you think, cartographers?

    [via kottke & waxy | Thanks, Jodi]

  • 10 Visualizations for Number of Days to Pay Your Taxes

    May 4, 2009  |  Visualization, Visualize This

    A couple weeks ago, FlowingData ran another Visualize This challenge. I posted a dataset on the number of days it takes the average person in each state to pay his or her taxes and asked you to visualize it. The number of days vary, because tax burden varies state-by-state. The day all taxes have been paid is dubbed Tax Freedom Day. Alaska has the earliest Tax Freedom Day while Connecticut has it last.

    Here are the interesting results you all came up with. Thanks to those who participated. Nice work all around. Continue Reading

  • Spectrum of Online Friendship

    May 1, 2009  |  Infographics

    This graphic, from Mike Arauz, describes different levels of online friendship, starting at passive interest (read your blog but not much else) up to investment (deeply care about your success). I originally thought it was just one of those comic infographics, but there's some good discussion going on in the comments of the original post and the Arauz' response.

    [Thanks, @JeffHurt]

  • What Drugs Pose the Greatest Danger?

    May 1, 2009  |  Infographics

    While The New York Times continues to produce excellent work, GOOD Magazine has been churning out interesting graphics on the other side of the spectrum. In their most recent transparency graphic, GOOD describes the drugs that pose the greatest danger according to local law officials, when asked by the Department of Justice. Underneath the creative bling is essentially a stacked bar chart. The purists are going to cry bloody murder, but hey, it still gets the point across, right?

    Have a nice weekend, everyone. See you Monday.

    [Thanks, @joaovc]

  • Is Your Country Involved in Open Source?

    April 30, 2009  |  Mapping

    Red Hat, an open source leader best known for their Linux distribution, maps open source activity around the world. If you're not a developer or involved with Web-ish things, open source might seem like a foreign concept. Give away your code, your work, and your data. And succeed? I don't know how it works, but somehow, it does. Open source not only helps an application flourish, but also helps ideas develop further than they ever would with a single group. Plus - it makes my life, and many others' lives much easier.

Unless otherwise noted, graphics and words by me are licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC. Contact original authors for everything else.