RGB Colorspace Atlas shows every shade in a cubic book

Posted to Data Art  |  Tags:  |  Nathan Yau

The 8-inch cube RGB Colorspace Atlas by artist Tauba Auerbach shows every color in said colorspace. Cubic rainbow. What does it mean? [Colossal via @periscopic]


  • Nice. I wonder how it was printed (CMYKRB?).

    It refers to “books” (plural), meaning multiple physical books were produced… and it doesn’t seem like anything (except maybe the airbrushed cover) would prevent these being bulk produced. Anyone got any idea of these are for sale or on exhibit anywhere?

    I wish art sites weren’t always too pretentious to give useful information…

  • Joshua Muskovitz September 7, 2012 at 2:12 pm

    Am I the only one who has a problem with the idea of representing an additive color space using subtractive color? The color spaces don’t even map 1:1.

    • Exactly – you beat me to it. It doesn’t even represent every colour in subtractive colour space, just the gamut of whatever printing process was used.

      • Joshua Muskovitz September 8, 2012 at 8:08 am

        Yea, I was going to comment on the limitations and repeatability of the printing process, but had already hit submit.

        I have encountered one use for something similar to this, a quarter century ago. When trying to match RGB values to the *desired* output on a particular printer, our software would let you print out reference books of (I believe it was) 64 pages of 64 x 64 tiles with the RGB values printed with them. You could then use it like a giant pantone book. But even this was subject to paper and ink variants, and ink fade from light exposure, and so on. Color matching has come a long ways since then.

        But as an “art” piece? Ugh. Spare me.


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