Obama’s Budget Proposal and Incorrect Forecasts

President Obama announced his 2011 budget proposal. How does it compare to last year's budget? Shan Carter and Amanda Cox of The New York Times compare the two plans. Red indicates a decrease in the percentage of the budget dedicated to the respective area, and green is for growth. Zoom in for a better view of the smaller areas.

Big decreases for Medicaid grants, veteran benefits, and unemployment insurance. Major increase for education, Medicare, and administration of justice.

This of course takes budget forecasting into account, which Cox shows isn't all that accurate sometimes.


[via @nytgraphics]


  • anthony damico February 2, 2010 at 9:30 am

    do you know what software amanda cox used to create the second graphic you present here?

  • Does anyone know of any treemap libraries that offer the zooming capabilities used here? Most of the visualization packages I’ve looked into allow you to highlight specific regions dynamically but not zoom in like this.

    I do global health research on causes of death, and I have a hierarchy of causes that would work great as a treemap. But at the most detailed level of ~300 causes, the boxes get so small that some sort of zooming is almost required. The transition between projected and actual is also nice, because I have a 60 year time series that would be nice to animate….

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!


Years You Have Left to Live, Probably

The individual data points of life are much less predictable than the average. Here’s a simulation that shows you how much time is left on the clock.

Famous Movie Quotes as Charts

In celebration of their 100-year anniversary, the American Film Institute selected the 100 most memorable quotes from American cinema, and …

Think Like a Statistician – Without the Math

I call myself a statistician, because, well, I’m a statistics graduate student. However, the most important things I’ve learned are less formal, but have proven extremely useful when working/playing with data.

Real Chart Rules to Follow

There are rules—usually for specific chart types meant to be read in a specific way—that you shouldn’t break. When they are, everyone loses. This is that small handful.