How to Make Square Pie Charts in R

Instead of traditional pie charts that rely on angles and arc lengths to show parts of a whole, try this easier-to-read version.

Regular pie charts have their issues with the perception of angle and arc length, but their main advantage is that they represent parts of a whole. The metaphor is universally known. The square pie chart offers an alternative without sacrificing the metaphor, and some studies suggest that they’re easier to read and more accurate at showing data.

In this tutorial, you learn how to make these things in R. The final result is a squarePie() function that you can use to quickly use the chart type.

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About the Author

Nathan Yau is a statistician who works primarily with visualization. He earned his PhD in statistics from UCLA, is the author of two best-selling books — Data Points and Visualize This — and runs FlowingData. Introvert. Likes food. Likes beer.

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