The Statistical Atlas that Keeps On Going

I already revived the first Statistical Atlas of the United States using modern data, going through each page and producing a more recent version. But it didn’t feel done yet. There’s a lot more data now than there was in 1870, and there’s a constant flow from various government organizations.

The United States continues to evolve, get better, and get worse.

So I kept going with it—in an effort to produce a more complete Statistical Atlas of the United States. There are a lot more maps and charts, searchable and browsable.

The plan is to update weekly, until all the data runs dry. This could be a while.

Want to keep the project going? I’d love if you became a supporting member. All of the graphics for the atlas are made in R (partly as a challenge to myself), and you’ll gain access to tutorials and a four-week course on how to do the same.

See where the atlas is at so far.

Become a member. Learn to visualize data. From beginner to advanced.

Join Today

Membership

This is for people interested in the process of creating, designing, and exploring data graphics. Your support goes directly to FlowingData, an independently run site.

What You Get

  • Instant access to tutorials on how to make and design data graphics
  • Source code and files to use with your own data
  • In-depth courses on visualization in R
  • Hand-picked links and resources from around the web
  • Members-only newsletter

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