Tutorials  / 

How to Map Geographic Paths in R

As people and things move through a place, it can be useful to see their connected paths instead of just individual points.

With the plethora of mobile apps to track your location and activities, such as OpenPaths and Moves, or the fitness-specific Endomondo, MapMyRun, and RunKeeper, many of us have a personal data source of where we are and how we got there. However, most of the maps available on these services only show a bunch of markers or only one path at once. It can be fun and useful to see more of the data at once.

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About the Author

Nathan Yau is a statistician who works primarily with visualization. He earned his PhD in statistics from UCLA, is the author of two best-selling books — Data Points and Visualize This — and runs FlowingData. Introvert. Likes food. Likes beer.