Detecting your face

Posted to Data Art  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Sterling Crispin reverse engineered facial recognition algorithms and produced masks that only kind of look human. Although the computer sees it differently.

This research has resulted in the production of a series of 3D printed face masks which were algorithmically evolved to satisfy facial recognition algorithms. It is important to understand the the goal of creating these masks isn’t to defeat facial recognition or provide something undetectable, simply covering your face with your hand will do that. Rather, my goal is to show the machine what it’s looking for, to hold a mirror up to the all-seeing eye of the digital-panopticon we live in and let it stare back into its own mind.

Creepy results. [via Kyle Chayka]

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