This Tract provides a view of Census data on your block

Posted to Online Applications  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

This Tract, by Michal Migurski of Stamen, with some help from Craig Mod, lets you view details of your block by way of Census data. It's still using 2000 data but was built in anticipation of the 2010 release, which should come in a couple of months. So we'll probably see some improvements from now until then.

Enter your location or browse the slippy map for information on race, income, gender, education, age, and housing. There are also aggregates for your Census tract, county, state, and country.

Above is the tract where you'll find Disneyland, and below are age breakdowns. Mmmm, donut.

I particularly like the technology lovefest at the bottom of the page, full of open-source goodness:

Geographic lookup by FCC’s Census Block Conversions API. Tract outlines from U.S. Census shapefiles. Demographic data from U.S. 2000 Census by way of census-tools. Map tile imagery courtesy of MapQuest and OpenStreetMap. Donut charts by Protovis. Slippy maps by Modest Maps JS. Browser geolocation bits from YQL Geo Library by way of Max Wheeler.

The mini-app is available on Github, by the way. Have an idea on how you can make use of the tract data? Have at the code yourself.

[This Tract via @eagereyes]

Favorites

Graphical perception – learn the fundamentals first

Before you dive into the advanced stuff – like just about everything in your life – you have to learn the fundamentals before you know when you can break the rules.

Famous Movie Quotes as Charts

In celebration of their 100-year anniversary, the American Film Institute selected the 100 most memorable quotes from American cinema, and …

Jobs Charted by State and Salary

Jobs and pay can vary a lot depending on where you live, based on 2013 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here’s an interactive to look.

A Day in the Life of Americans

I wanted to see how daily patterns emerge at the individual level and how a person’s entire day plays out. So I simulated 1,000 of them.