Abstract maps of the United States

Posted to Maps  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

Esquire invited a handful of map-makers to represent the United States outside its borders.

Red state, blue state, big state, small state, north and south and east and west: How we define our similarities and differences with each other often comes down to where we see ourselves on the map of America. But what if we threw out the standard-issue version and started over with something new?

Esquire’s online format doesn’t do the maps justice though. A lot of the images are too small to see the details. In particular, don’t miss Eric Fischer’s high-resolution cartogram and Stamen’s interactive on where the money went. Fischer’s map shows density of geotags, but zoom in, and you can see major cities in detail. Stamen’s map uses IRS data in a twist to the migration map, showing county-level monetary gains and losses.

Favorites

Think Like a Statistician – Without the Math

I call myself a statistician, because, well, I’m a statistics graduate student. However, the most important things I’ve learned are less formal, but have proven extremely useful when working/playing with data.

Top Brewery Road Trip, Routed Algorithmically

There are a lot of great craft breweries in the United States, but there is only so much time. This is the computed best way to get to the top rated breweries and how to maximize the beer tasting experience. Every journey begins with a single sip.

The Changing American Diet

See what we ate on an average day, for the past several decades.

Real Chart Rules to Follow

There are rules—usually for specific chart types meant to be read in a specific way—that you shouldn’t break. When they are, everyone loses. This is that small handful.