Connections among Twitter employees

Posted to Data Art  |  Nathan Yau

Because you can never get enough Twitter visualizations, Jason Stirman takes a look at the tweets among Twitter's first 140 employees. It's called 140 Characters [pdf]. Ha. Get it?

Much like Chris Harrison's Bible viz, 140 Characters represents connections, or in this case mutual follows, with arcs. Employees are sorted by account creation date, and larger arcs represent an older employee linked with a newer one. The bar graph shows the number of tweets, relative to everyone else. For example, the engineers @al3x and @evan are quite active, along with newer employee @tiger. Good stuff.

140 Characters is meant only as something pretty to look at, but to take a step in the more analytical direction, I'd try sizing the bars by relative number of mentions between the employees. For one, you'd see who's most "popular" and second, you might start to see the conversations within the group. I'd expect @ev and @biz to have a lot of @mentions, especially during presentations. Placing employees by creation time, instead of just order, could be interesting too.

[Thanks, @MacDivaONA]

5 Comments

  • Michael Balzer April 30, 2010 at 6:32 am

    Sorting the employees by account creation date makes the arc visualization effectively useless, because their is no relation between date and the connection between the employees. Creating some kind of clustering based on the connection graph and use this for sorting the employees would allow you to see much more structure, and not just a bunch of colored arcs.

    • not totally true. larger arcs would show older employees and newer employees linked to each other. jason tells me that the expectation was that older employees would be linked and newer ones would be linked, but what he found the group seemed to be much more tightly knit.

  • It looks like a Vegas fountain!

    I love it that they did this with Processing. Between this and the open sourcing of the streamgraph code, Processing is really on a tear. FTW!

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