Regularities and Patterns Within a Literary Space

Posted to Data Art  |  Nathan Yau

Stefanie Posavec, maps literary works at the Sheffield Galleries On the Map exhibit. There are several parts to Stefanie's piece mapping sentence length, writing style, and structure. From the looks of things, it looks like the parsing process was manual and involved a lot of highlighting and circling of things. I could be wrong though. For some reason, long and manual labor makes me appreciate things more.

Rhythm Texture

This one maps by use of punctuation and text style. For example, a dark ring might represent an exclamation point while the wrapping spaces are quotation marks.

Rhythm Texture

Sentence Length

What looks like a series of stacked bar charts, Stefanie represents Jack Kerouac's On the Road by sentence length. Bars are colored by what the sentence what about. For example, the burgundy red are sentences that had to do with women, sex, and relationships.

Sentence Length

[via Neoformix and Notcot]



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