Millennial cherry-picking

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Emily Beam highlights confirmation bias in articles recently suggesting that more millennial men pine for the days when men worked and women stayed at home, based on results from the General Social Survey.

The GSS surveys are pretty small – about 2,000-3,000 per wave – so once you split by sample, and then split by age, and then exclude the older millennials (age 26-34) who don’t show any negative trend in gender equality, you’re left with cells of about 60-100 men ages 18-25 per wave. Standard errors on any given year are 6-8 percent.

Mind your data.

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