See what you and others tweet about with the Topic Explorer

Posted to Infographics  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

When you first come across a Twitter account it can be hard to know if you want to follow that person or organization, based on the most recent tweets. Jeff Clark’s Tweet Topic Explorer gives you a quick view of that. Enter a username, and you get a clustered cloud of bubbles. Larger bubbles indicate topics that are tweeted more often and topics that are closely correlated (that is, appear together often) are colored the same.

Above is the view for @flowingdata. As you’d expect, data is in the center, and it branches out from there.

Similarly, the view for the New York Times is a mix of topics.

And a bit less diverse for Justin Bieber. Nevvveeerrr saaaaayyy neeevvver.

What do you tweet about?

[Neoformix via @jeffclark]

3 Comments

  • Gerard St. Croix April 20, 2011 at 12:51 am

    Not a bad effort, although multilingual users should be aware that it’s basically only useful in English, since it doesn’t filter grammatical particles in other languages – in other words, the big red positions are filled with stuff like “the”, “and”, “to” a.s.o. Still nice for what it is.

    • It’s been improved to handle stop words in Italian, French, Spanish, German, and Dutch. It’s not comprehensive but should now be more useful in those cases.

  • Photography-Cameras-Photos!!!!…..Lots of Photos and News Media

Favorites

19 Maps That Will Blow Your Mind and Change the Way You See the World. Top All-time. You Won’t Believe Your Eyes. Watch.

Many lists of maps promise to change the way you see the world, but this one actually does.

The Most Unisex Names in US History

Moving on from the most trendy names in US history, let’s look at the most unisex ones. Some names have …

Real Chart Rules to Follow

There are rules—usually for specific chart types meant to be read in a specific way—that you shouldn’t break. When they are, everyone loses. This is that small handful.

Interactive: When Do Americans Leave For Work?

We don’t all start our work days at the same time, despite what morning rush hour might have you think.