Complement data with emotion for full effect

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Data is a great vehicle for arguments, but the (not just visual) perception can change completely depending how a reader feels. Cognitive neuroscientist Tali Sharot talks facts and emotions on Hidden Brain.

The example at the end is interesting. Tell a person a joke when they’re sad, and they probably won’t think the joke is funny. Make the person happy first, and it’s more likely they’ll see the joke from your point of view. How does this transfer to the communication of data? [via Kim Rees]

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