Type I and II errors simplified

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

“Type I” and “Type II” errors, names first given by Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson to describe rejecting a null hypothesis when it’s true and accepting one when it’s not, are too vague for stat newcomers (and in general). This is better. [via]

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