How people really read and share online

Mar 12, 2014

Tony Haile discusses how we read and share online, based on actual data. It’s not as click- and pageview-based as you might think.

A widespread assumption is that the more content is liked or shared, the more engaging it must be, the more willing people are to devote their attention to it. However, the data doesn’t back that up. We looked at 10,000 socially-shared articles and found that there is no relationship whatsoever between the amount a piece of content is shared and the amount of attention an average reader will give that content.

When we combined attention and traffic to find the story that had the largest volume of total engaged time, we found that it had fewer than 100 likes and fewer than 50 tweets. Conversely, the story with the largest number of tweets got about 20% of the total engaged time that the most engaging story received.

Favorites

Most popular porn searches, by state

We’ve seen that we can learn from what people search …

Unemployment in America, Mapped Over Time

Watch the regional changes across the country from 1990 to 2016.

The Best Data Visualization Projects of 2011

I almost didn’t make a best-of list this year, but …

Divorce and Occupation

Some jobs tend towards higher divorce rates. Some towards lower. Salary also probably plays a role.