Fitbit data to be used in court as evidence

Posted to Self-surveillance  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Personal data from Facebook, Twitter, and email are already used, so sure why not. Fitbit-generated movement data is now used in the courtroom.

The young woman in question was injured in an accident four years ago. Back then, Fitbits weren’t even on the market, but given that she was a personal trainer, her lawyers at McLeod Law believe they can say with confidence that she led an active lifestyle. A week from now, they will start processing data from her Fitbit to show that her activity levels are now under a baseline for someone of her age and profession.

It will “back up what she’s been saying,” says her lawyer, Simon Muller of McLeod Law.

Sounds okay. This quote stuck out for me though:

Now we’re looking at longer periods of time though the course of a day, and we have hard data.

Hard data. I’d have to see it, but I’m pretty sure there’s some fuzziness and uncertainty there. I wonder if the defense has a go at an analysis that shows the opposite of the plaintiff’s claims.

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