Network visualization game to understand how a disease spreads

Posted to Network Visualization  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Vax, a game by Ellsworth Campbell and Isaac Bromley, explores how a disease spreads through a network, starting with just one infected person. It’s a simple concept that works well.

When you start the game, you have a network of uninfected people. The more connected a person is, the more chances that person can infect others upon his or her own infection. Your goal is to strategically administer a limited supply of vaccinations and to quarantine people to prevent as many infections as you can.

Fun and educational. Woo.

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