Polling for stress

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a survey about peoples’ stress levels and factors contributing to the stress. It took place for about a month. NPR started a summary of their findings, of what will be a two-week segment on the air and online.

The above shows the percent of respondents in the age brackets who said the factors (the rows in this case) contributed to their current stress. It looks like I might be in a less stressful stage of my life, between the age of 30 and 39.

It’s just an early summary of poll responses right now, so I’m hoping they go into more detail about statistically significant differences between demographics and how the 2,500-person sample correlates to the the US population.

Favorites

Graphical perception – learn the fundamentals first

Before you dive into the advanced stuff – like just about everything in your life – you have to learn the fundamentals before you know when you can break the rules.

How to Spot Visualization Lies

Many charts don’t tell the truth. This is a simple guide to spotting them.

Jobs Charted by State and Salary

Jobs and pay can vary a lot depending on where you live, based on 2013 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here’s an interactive to look.

Real Chart Rules to Follow

There are rules—usually for specific chart types meant to be read in a specific way—that you shouldn’t break. When they are, everyone loses. This is that small handful.