Predicting the future of prediction

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Tarot cards don’t cut it anymore as a predictors. We turn to data for a look to the future:

“We’re finally in a position where people volunteer information about their specific activities, often their location, who they’re with, what they’re doing, how they’re feeling about what they’re doing, what they’re talking about,” said Johan Bollen, a professor at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington who developed a way to predict the ups and downs of the stock market based on Twitter activity. “We’ve never had data like that before, at least not at that level of granularity.” Bollen added: “Right now it’s a gold rush.”

Or you could just get yourself a flux capacitor and save yourself some time.

[Boston]

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