Lego cartograms show immigration and migration

Posted to Data Art  |  Tags: , , ,  |  Nathan Yau

LEGOs were my favorite toy growing up. This was back when the pieces came in buckets rather than the instruction-filled Star Wars sets that we see nowadays, so it was more about building whatever popped into your head. Good memories. In any case, Samuel Granados took a big ol’ bucket of LEGOs and made some cartograms showing immigration and emigration in the Americas. Each piece represents 10,000 people.

The above shows immigrants, while below is a cartogram that shows emigrants from Mexico.

Here’s a guy pretending he doesn’t know someone is taking a picture.

The source is the DRC on Migration, Globalisation, and Poverty, but it’s unclear what timespan this is. If anyone knows, please feel free to enlighten us in the comments.

[Samuel Granados via infosthetics]

1 Comment

  • In the first picture, what in the world (pun intended) is happening in….looks like Costa Rica?

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