Write your own TED talk with lies, damned lies and statistics

Posted to Statistics  |  Nathan Yau

Sebastian Wernicke, an engagement manager at Oliver Wyman and former bioinformatics researcher, explains the results from his pseudo-analysis of TED talks. The result: a guide on how to give the ultimate TED talk. Go as long as you can, grow your hair out and wear glasses, and cover happy ideas that are easy to relate to. Or better yet, use Wernicke’s tedPAD to formulaically write your own talk to drive the audience wild – or boo at you emphatically.

Now ladies and gentleman, for the first time ever, I give you my TED talk. It’s still rough, so be nice.

I’ll give you a couple of examples to show that happiness is a continuous journey. (Applause.) Thank you very much. We truly have a choice to make something happen the same way that others have before us. Consider French people who get very old. And then all of a sudden, we realize that a mirror does not always reveal pleasant surprises. How many of you would rather consider coffee – that really has to be said once and for all. More importantly, all of a sudden there is this choice although other people say it’s bad et cetera, et cetera. But if you’re creative and determined enough, you need surprises. How many of you would not agree? I believe that a mirror might be helpful the same way that it has been before. I then remembered the story of a patient which I would like to introduce to you in more detail. Looking at myself in the mirror for the world would help.

What. You think you can do better? Doubtful.

[Thanks, @Lonnen]

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