Map Shows Newspaper Endorsements in US Presidential Election

Posted to Maps  |  Nathan Yau

Philip, from infochimps, maps newspaper endorsements using data from the Editor & Publisher’s list. Circles with the blue radial gradient are newspapers that endorse Obama and John Kerry in 2004 while the red ones show McCain/Bush endorsements. The lighter blue circles are newspapers that endorse Obama, but actually endorsed George Bush in 2004. It’s a similar encoding for the John McCain endorsements except in red and the flip being John Kerry. Circle size is newspaper’s circulation.

The only thing I found a little weird was that the Dem to Rep or Rep to Dem endorsements were represented with all blue or all red. It certainly makes the circles stand out – which was the point – but doesn’t really indicate a flip. I had to mouse over the circle to find that out.

[via FlowingData Forums | Thanks, mrflip]

5 Comments

  • Huh? Your explanation isn’t correct. The circles with a gradient/border are the ones that flipped parties between 2004 and 2008; the lighter circles are the ones that endorsed the same party across the elections.

  • @Reader – No. Circles with a gradient fill don’t have a border.

  • Wouldn’t it be cool if all the newspapers were reporting news instead of choosing sides and skewing information to endorse a particular POV?
    Of course, that wouldn’t make for a very interesting map… just a bunch of grey circles. Hmmm… but then people would be forced to THINK about the issues themselves and make a truly ‘informed’ choice about X.

  • @Bryan – reporting just news and facts? ridiculous

Favorites

Interactive: When Do Americans Leave For Work?

We don’t all start our work days at the same time, despite what morning rush hour might have you think.

Real Chart Rules to Follow

There are rules—usually for specific chart types meant to be read in a specific way—that you shouldn’t break. When they are, everyone loses. This is that small handful.

Divorce Rates for Different Groups

We know when people usually get married. We know who never marries. Finally, it’s time to look at the other side: divorce and remarriage.

The Changing American Diet

See what we ate on an average day, for the past several decades.