Maps before maps

Posted to Maps  |  Tags:  |  Nathan Yau

Amanda Uren has a fun collection of map-like scans from the 11th century. Some of them are geographic, but most of them are more like rough sketches of how the individual saw the area the image represents. It's like those stereotype maps that people like to make, except no one's trying to be funny.


  • An interesting site. Too bad there are no dates. Also, people should remember that the convention was putting East at the top of the map, so you’ll likely have to twist your head to the left in order to recognize that this is a simplified version of the Med.

    Cool stuff, though…

  • Very interesting indeed! These kind of maps inspired me and became the subject of my graduation project. If anyone’s interested, check out my interactive visualisation aimed to create an overall insight into the evolution of how man has presented the earth. A screencap can be found here:

    (If I may be so bold)


Jobs Charted by State and Salary

Jobs and pay can vary a lot depending on where you live, based on 2013 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here’s an interactive to look.

Graphical perception – learn the fundamentals first

Before you dive into the advanced stuff – like just about everything in your life – you have to learn the fundamentals before you know when you can break the rules.

Think Like a Statistician – Without the Math

I call myself a statistician, because, well, I’m a statistics graduate student. However, the most important things I’ve learned are less formal, but have proven extremely useful when working/playing with data.

Reviving the Statistical Atlas of the United States with New Data

Due to budget cuts, there is no plan for an updated atlas. So I recreated the original 1870 Atlas using today’s publicly available data.