Results for moritz

  • Is There a Market for Premium Online Data Visualization?

    Posted to Visualization

    Ever since I posted my visualization that shows the spread of Walmart, I've gotten a lot of emails asking how I did it, if I've considered applying it to other datasets, or if I could help with a customized version of the Walmart visualization. I've gotten similar inquiries about the gas price graphic. This makes me wonder -- is there a market for premium visualization online?

    Existing Premium Visualization

    I know there's definitely a market for data-specific visualization - viz made specifically for a certain type of data - otherwise design groups like Bestiario and Stamen wouldn't be around. But what about visualization that developers (or non-developers) can integrate into websites and applications with their own data?

    FusionCharts

    For example, FusionCharts lets developers integrate the more traditional visualizations like bar charts and basic maps into their websites. Everything runs in Flash and has a little bit of animation and some interaction. According to the site's homepage, 30,000+ developers use FusionCharts. Licenses run from $69 for individuals to $1,999 for enterprise.

    Constellation Roamer

    Daniel develops Constellation Roamer. It's a network graph interface that lets you explore connectedness. The Roamer has been out for about four months now and according to Daniel, has sold about 10 individual licenses at $550 each. This is interesting because the leads come from search engines without any advertising or publicity. While the sales are modest, he's also gotten a lot of freelance work for customized versions of the Roamer to keep him plenty busy.

    Relation Browser

    Similarly, Moritz developed Relation Browser a couple years ago and says he gets an inquiry about once a week even though, like Daniel, doesn't advertise. Relation Browser is a network graph visualization that lets you explore relationships. The example below shows relationships between countries, but can also be applied to something like a social network. Moritz releases his code for free, but requires commercial vendors to purchase a license for 400 Euros (about $600) each.

    Free Visualization Tools

    So there's definitely some kind of demand for a more refined online visualization; however, there's been a growing number of free visualization tools available to developers. Do these take away the need for paid online visualization tools?

    Google Visualization API

    Most well known is perhaps Google's visualization API that they released in March, including the motion chart shown below. The API also includes a basic graphing utility along with a hodge podge of some other, uh, not so useful tools.

    Many Eyes

    Many Eyes promotes social data analysis and is best known for its interactive visualizations. Last year, they brought embeddable visualization, mostly for bloggers to share with others. However, the drawback is that you can't push frequently-updated data into the Many Eyes application. The only way to get an updated visualization is to edit an existing dataset or upload a new one manually.

    Room for Both Free and Premium

    It seems that there's room for both. While the free tools from Google and Many Eyes are useful in their own right, premium visualization can provide a higher level of customization (for complex data streams and aesthetics) and integration into a site or an application.

    Tweeting Thoughts

    I asked the same question on Twitter a few days ago and got some interesting responses from my Twitter friends:

    @Omomyid: hmmmmm, how would you make it extensible though? The thing about cool infographics is that they are purpose built right?

    @chris23: prolly a possible analyst service to provide visualizations/tools for market interests.

    @der_mo: yes, totally. I keep selling the relation browser (http://der-mo.net/relationB...) although it is a couple of years old...

    @hungryclone: maybe to companies w/ no dedicated employees that know how to make them?

    Your Thoughts

    What do you think? Is there a marketplace for visualization on the web or do the free APIs make it a moot point?

  • 5 Data Visualization Dissertations Worth a Look

    Posted to Visualization

    It's coming to the end of the academic year, which means there are lots of graduate students frantically finishing up their dissertations, defending, and earning their degrees (yay!). Here are some tasty visualization dissertations, new and old, worth thumbing through.

    Information Visualization for the People
    Information Visualization for the People by Mike Danziger, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Comparative Media Studies

    Form of Facts and Figures
    The Form of Facts and Figures by Christian Behrens, Potsdam University of Applied Sciences, Interface Design

    Practical Tools for Exploring Data and Models
    Practical Tools for Exploring Data and Models by Hadley Wickham, Iowa State University, Department of Statistics

    Visual Tools for the Socio–semantic Web
    Visual Tools for the Socio–semantic Web by Moritz Stefaner, Potsdam University of Applied Sciences, Interface Design

    Computational Information Design
    Computational Information Design by Ben Fry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Arts and Sciences

  • Hierarchical Glossary as Interactive Network Graphs

    Posted to Visualization

    Moritz has been working on visualization of a hierarchical glossary carefully named "Glossary Visualization" versions 2-5. Not sure where version 1 is. Being a network graph, I can see this getting chaotic when there are more words (or categories) involved, but then again, maybe that's all the words. In either case, it beats browsing through words in a dictionary; although, these prototypes don't include definitions yet.

    In the most recent version, words are represented as a DOI tree showing only the categories. Click on a category and view the sub-categories.

    glossary visualization

    All four versions were implemented using the recently-mentioned Flare visualization toolkit.

    What do you think - cluttered or just right?

  • Data Visualization Blogs You Might Not Know About

    Posted to Visualization

    We all know about information aesthetics, but what other visualization blogs are out there? While writing for FlowingData I've come across some good ones as people send me links (hint) or that I've just randomly found. Here are some of the visualization (and mapping) blogs that I enjoy.

    • Strange Maps - Lots of unique maps from ads, books, papers, etc with very informed commentary.
    • Well-formed Data - Moritz is interested in interface design, visualization, statistics and data mining and is a freelance visualizer.
    • Random Etc. - Tom occasionally updates his blog with thoughts, resources, and, well, random etc.
    • Serial Consign - Greg talks about design and research with some visualization mixed in.
    • AnyGeo - Covers everything geospatial, although I do wish Glenn would switch to full feeds.

    What are some of your favorites that others might not know about?