• Wear the weather as a bracelet

    Posted to Data Art  |  Tags:

    We all know that data is the new sexy, so it's only natural for data to find its way into jewelry. This weather bracelet represents a year of temperatures and rain. Peak heights are mapped to minimum and maximum daily temperatures, and the holes in the sides represent weekly rainfall.
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  • Comment to win free copies of ‘Beginning Python Visualization’ – Winners announced

    Posted to Contests

    You know when you're going through old junk and find something really awesome that you completely forgot about? Well that's what happened to me the other day, and lucky for you it's free e-copies of Beginning Python Visualization. Four of them, actually.

    Simply leave a comment below by Sunday, March 28, 11:59pm EDT for a chance to win, and then come back to this post on Monday to see the winners. Let's make it a round of desert island. Name the five movies that you would want to take with you if you were stranded on a desert island.

    I'll get it started:

    • Back to the Future
    • Forrest Gump
    • Billy Elliot
    • Shawsank Redemption
    • The Sting

    Good luck!

    P.S. Here's my review of Beginning Python Visualization, in case you missed it.

    Winner Announced

    Congratulations to the four following people. You should have received your redemption codes via email by now.

    Thanks everyone else for participating, and good luck next time.

  • What your email says about your finances

    Posted to Infographics

    This graphic shows average debt categorized by email provider. Average age for Gmail users is 33 and 47 for Comcast. Yeah, that sounds about right.
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  • The Growing Plague that is Spam

    Posted to Infographics

    Spam sucks. We all hate it, but no matter how good the filter, something always seems to get through. Want some cheap Vi4gr4? I can tell you where to get it. New Scientist takes a look at the spamdemic. It costs very little to send tens of thousands of emails, but it only takes a tiny percentage of idiots to make it all worth it for spammers.

    Seriously - who falls for these things?

    • oRo1exWatches $200 Off - Each Free Shipping Watch, 2 Days Left, Snap UP! rkru kp
    • USA: ~Percocent~Ritalin best sale !!
    • ~~~Good day :~~~Vicodi~ _ P~ercocet~~~
    • 100 percent male power
    • Heartfelt Plea from Supreme Master Ching Hai: Be Organic Vegan and Loving Kindness for Saving Lives

    I have to admit my spam folder does supply brief moments of amusement every now and then, but come on.

    [via Data Mining]

  • Poll: What do you mostly use visualization for?

    Posted to Polls, Visualization

    We use visualization for a lot of different things, and its purpose varies person-to-person. Some use it to report the news. Others use it purely for analysis and decision-making. Some even use it for artistic expression. What do you use visualization for? Select the answer that best fits you below. If you select "other," let us know what that means in the comments.

    {democracy:13}
  • March Madness by the numbers

    Posted to Infographics  |  Tags:

    I didn't fill out my bracket this year, so it's not nearly as exciting for me. I don't think that's stopped thousands of bars across the country from cleaning house though.

    [FastCompany via Good]

  • Buy and sell data at Data Marketplace

    Posted to Data Sources

    Add another site to the list of places to find the data you need. Data Marketplace connects people who want data to people who can find, scrape, and cull data.

    Here's how it works. If you want data, you put in a request and optionally, a deadline and budget. A provider can then go find that data for you, maybe through scraping a difficult-to-parse website, and then post it online. You then have the option to purchase the tabular data.

    There are three big humps to get over though for Data Marketplace to work.
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  • Data Underload #14 – Popeil Pitch

    Posted to Data Underload

    As corny as the Ronco infomercials are, you can't help but stop and watch late at night. It's all about the "set it, and forget it" showtime rotisserie. Here's to you, Ron Popeil. The man. The legend.
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  • Weekend Fodder

    Posted to Quicklinks

    The strange science of Francis Galton - Inspired by his cousin Charles Darwin's work, he created the statistical concept of regression and correlation, but he was one crazy dude. Also invented the term eugenics and coined the phrase nature versus nurture.

    Flickr Flow - Wattenberg and Viegas explore the colors of the seasons through Flickr pics. [thx, abigail]

    Wild Bill Bunge - A look at the pioneering work of influential cartographer, William Wheeler Bunge, Jr., the anti-academic. [thx, chris]

    C-SPAN Video Library - 160,000 hours of unadulterated C-SPAN video, "like being able to Google political history." [thx, jesse]

  • Graphical perception – learn the fundamentals first

    Posted to Design  |  Tags:

    When it comes to visualization, especially on the Web, you have to be open-minded, and you should be willing to try new things. There’s no advancing otherwise. However, before you dive into the advanced stuff - like just about everything in your life - you have to learn the fundamentals before you know when you can break the rules.

    You have to know what flavors work together and against each other before you cook a feast fit for a king. You have to learn grammar and spelling before you can write a book that others will actually enjoy.

    So when you’re learning to visualize data, do yourself a favor and learn the basic rules first. Then you can spend the rest of your days breaking them.
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  • Powerpoint and dying kittens

    Posted to Miscellaneous

    I'm 96% sure this isn't true. [Mark Goetz via dataviz]

  • Thanks, FlowingData Sponsors

    Posted to Sponsors

    A big thank you to FlowingData sponsors. They keep the virtual lights on around here and allow FlowingData to keep growing.

    I can also tell you that all of them show up in the sidebar because I know they'll be useful to many of you. Check out the data tools these fine groups have to offer:

    InstantAtlas – Create and present compelling data reports on geographic maps.

    Tableau Software – Data exploration and visual analytics in an easy-to-use analysis tool.

    Xcelsius Engage – Create insightful and engaging dashboards from any data source with point-and-click ease.

    Business Intelligence – Visual data analysis made easy. Try 30 days for free.

    RWW Graph Contest - ReadWriteWeb Interactive Graph Contest
    Create an interactive graph and enter to win a trip to Web 2.0!

    Xcelsius Present – Transform spreadsheets into professional, interactive presentations.

  • Christopher Walken and Census

    Posted to Miscellaneous

    You should have received your Census survey by now. Did you fill it out and mail it yet? If not, get to it. Tim Meadows can only do so many door-to-doors.
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  • A Defense of the Unknown in Infographics

    Posted to Quotes  |  Tags:

    We’re inventors - we’re creators. And that’s the most important thing about what we do. And I think we should welcome failure every once in a while.

    Hannah Fairfield - NYT Graphics Editor, Malofiej 18, March 2010

    Last year at Malofiej, one of the major awards ceremonies for infographics in journalism, The New York Times took home 'Best in Show' for their work on box office receipts from 1986 to 2008. I'm sure most of you saw it. It was non-traditional. It was an adaptation of Lee Byron's streamgraph, which he had previously applied to last.fm music listening habits - a smoothed stacked area chart at the core.
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  • The everyday in Google Maps

    Posted to Miscellaneous

    With his usual cleverness, Christoph Niemann illustrates the everyday as Google maps. My favorite is the omelet highway. Oh what a twisty and confusing highway this GPS-less life is.
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  • Notes from Interactive Infographics #interinfo #sxsw

    Posted to Infographics, News

    Yesterday was the Interactive Infographics panel at South by Southwest, and if Twitter is any indication of how it went, I'd say the panel had a captivated audience. I wouldn't expect anything less from the four panelists, Ben Fry (Processing), Shan Carter (NYT), Casey Caplowe (Good), and Eric Rodenbeck (Stamen)

    Unfortunately, I didn't get to attend, but luckily I was able to follow the play-by-play on Livefyre (sort of a cross between chat and forum) along with some excellent notes from @jpmarcum and @bryanconnor. Here are the important bits I was able to glean.

    The bulk of the time was spent showcasing the work from the four groups. I think you can find most of the projects through FlowingData. Just use the search form on the bottom right of this page. The good stuff came towards the end during the Q&A.
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  • Use your skills to help others

    Posted to Infographics

    Designer Christopher Harrell talks about, with a dose of various embedded graphics, pointing your skills toward something good. Harrell's video was one of the winners in the What Matters to You scholarship competition for Vancouver Film School. It looks like home video, but that just adds to the charm.
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  • Statistical Atlas from the ninth Census in 1870

    Posted to Statistical Visualization  |  Tags:

    In 1870, Francis Walker oversaw publication of the United States' first Statistical Atlas, based on data from the ninth Census. It was a big moment for statistics in the United States as the atlas provided a way to compare data on a national level using maps and statistical graphics.

    What continues to amaze me about these old illustrations is the detail - all done by hand. That's ridiculous. The kicker is that a lot of this stuff looks way better than a lot of what we see nowadays. Here are some selections from the 1870 atlas.
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  • Tim Berners-Lee with an update on open data

    Posted to Data Sharing

    If people put data on the Web - government data, scientific data, community data - whatever it is, it will be used by other people to do wonderful things in ways they never could have imagined.

    — Tim Berners-Lee, TED, February 2010

    Tim Berners-Lee, credited with inventing the World Wide Web, comes back to TED a year after his call for open, structured data with a quick update. Spoiler alert: things are looking good - and they're only going to get a lot better. But you already knew that, right?
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  • Data Underload #13 – Corned Beef Recipe

    Posted to Data Underload

    For as far back as I can remember, I've always had corned beef and cabbage on St. Patrick's Day, or at least on the week of. There isn't a speck of Irish in my family, but for some reason my mom always made it, and now I make it myself.

    I don't know the origins nor care enough to look it up on Wikipedia. All I know is that there will be three straight days of corned beef-related food, and that's good enough for me. Mmm, salty, beefy goodness. Reuben or corned beef hash anyone?