• Mapping Google Access Data from (suit)men

    January 18, 2008  |  Mapping

    There's a nice real-time (?) map on (suit)men Entertainment. Click the black rectangle on the bottom left-hand corner to see the entire map. Supposedly the map is powered by Google, so I want to say it's showing search data or something of that sort. To be honest though, I have no clue.

    Whenever a number pops up, there's a line that connects some country to Japan (the site's origin), so I'm guessing they're mapping something like accesses to the (suit)men site from whatever country. Oh well, no matter. Look how pretty. It's entertainment, and it managed to entertain me for a good few minutes (which says alot with my short attention span :). Does anyone know what they're showing?

    [via Simple Complexity]

  • A Primer on Information and Data Visualization

    January 14, 2008  |  Data Art

    On We Make Money Not Art is a summary of Jose-Luis's talk on some of the history of visualizing data and some more modern pieces.

    It begins with Charles Joseph Minard's march of Napoleon and then onto John Snow's cholera map, both of which were made ever so popular by Tufte. By now, if you've cracked open an infovis book, you've seen both.

    Moving on to more modern stuff, there's The Dumpster, 10x10, Listening Post among some other interesting pieces. If you're new to visualization, it's a good "intro to vis" post. If you've been around for a while, you've probably seen most of the examples, but there might be a couple you haven't.

    On a semi-related note, there's also an interview with Miguel on WMMNA discussing our humanflows project. Thanks, Regine!

  • New Hampshire Graphic from The Times

    January 11, 2008  |  Statistical Visualization

    This graphic is from The New York Times graphics department. It matches the FlowingData colors. That is all. Oh, and it's excellent, but that's a given, right? Note the use of each bar's two dimensions.

  • 8 Reasons Why I Do Not Like Data360

    January 10, 2008  |  Visualization

    Data360 is a social data site similar to Swivel and Many Eyes but without any of the bells and whistles. It markets itself as a site designed for

    • organizational reporting
    • intelligence databases, and
    • collaborative analysis

    Unfortunately, Data360 fails in the above three categories, and here are my 8 reasons why. Continue Reading

  • Sit Back and Relax with Casual Information Visualization

    December 28, 2007  |  Data Art

    Zachary Pousman et al. write in their paper Casual Information Visualization: Depictions of Data in Everyday Life

    Information visualization has often focused on providing deep insight for expert user populations and on techniques for amplifying cognition through complicated interactive visual models. This paper proposes a new subdomain for infovis research that complements the focus on analytic tasks and expert use. Instead of work-related and analytically driven infovis, we propose Casual Information Visualization (or Casual Infovis) as a complement to more traditional infovis domains. Traditional infovis systems, techniques, and methods do not easily lend themselves to the broad range of user populations, from expert to novices, or from work tasks to more everyday situations.

    Continue Reading

  • Names Mentioned in Debates by Major Presidential Candidates

    December 20, 2007  |  Network Visualization

    naming-names

    Jonathan Corum and Farhana Hossain created a network visualization that shows readers who has spoken about who in presidential debates. Scroll over each candidate name to isolate the connections; important/interesting points are highlighted. Candidates are colored blue and red for their respective political parties.

    There are three main things that this thing shows -- who has spoken about who (lines), who has been talking the most (circle segments), and finally, attention by party (red and blue). In usual fashion, The New York Times churns out another beautiful graphic. Not only is the visualization attractive, but unlike so many network diagrams before it, this graphic is also useful and informative.

  • Man Takes a Picture of Himself Every Day for 6 Years

    December 19, 2007  |  Data Art, Self-surveillance

    Noah Kalina took a picture of himself every day for six years (and still going); above is all of the pictures put together into a time lapse. Now that's diligence.

    When I was collecting my own step data with a pedometer, I would constantly forget, and eventually, I just got bored with it. I think my interest faded because collecting one number per day wasn't satisfying enough. This on the other hand, seems more personal, it takes a little less effort, and it only takes a second to take a picture, and like they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. String them together and you get a story.
    Continue Reading

  • One Day in the Life of the Average American

    December 17, 2007  |  Statistical Visualization

    Jobs by Happiness from Time MagazineTime Magazine's multimedia section has a fun, little piece showing some statistics for a day in the life of the average American. There's some mapping for average commute time, annual traffic delays, and city population shifts. I'm not a huge fan of the map on the third dimension, but oh well.

    There's also a simple grid ranking jobs by level of happiness. Priests are apparently the happiest with gas station attendants at the very bottom. Poor gas station attendants. I guess I might classify myself as a computer programmer which is somewhere in between waiters and dress makers. Maybe I should consider a change in focus. Although, I could also consider myself an engineer which is towards the top of the rankings. Alright, I'm an engineer. The title of "computer programmer" has a weird stigma attached to it anyways.

  • Three Designers, a Statistician, and Migration Inflows Data

    December 3, 2007  |  Mapping

    After two weeks at Visualizar, I'm back in the United States. It's good to be back. I don't know how many people know this (because I certainly didn't), but the people in Madrid (or all of Spain?) eat a ridiculous number of sandwiches. I spoke to a couple of locals who said it's pretty common to eat two sandwiches a day every day. I'm all sandwiched out.

    Anyways, the Visualizar symposium / workshop was a lot of fun, really interesting, and I ended up learning a lot more than I expected from some incredibly talented people. During my two weeks, I had the opportunity to work with designers Miguel Cabanzo, Iman Moradi, and Monica Sanchez and we managed to build a visualization framework that shows migration data with economic indicators. We call the piece humanflows.

    Human Flows, the Piece

    humanflows Poster by Miguel Cabanzo

    I just tried putting humanflows online, but of course it's not working on my server right now (because all computers are against me), so I settled for a couple of screencasts. You'll just have to take my word for it that the whole thing came together really nicely with a kiosk-looking type setup and a designer's touch (three of them, actually). The visualization itself was done in Processing.

    Here's the first one that just shows the flows. Right off bat, you can see the huge rush to the United States (especially immigrants from Mexico).

    This one shows the flows with unemployment rate.

    We also did one with GDP, but you get the idea.

    Of course, now that we have a framework, there's so many other things that I can think of adding. Functionality like specific country selection and the ability to browse through other indicators would really allow some serious data exploration and since we were working with data form the United Nations Common Database, which has a hundreds of publicly available datasets, there's a lot to work with.

    So there it is. Humanflows.

    Through the development process, I learned a lot about what I can do with Processing as well as gained an entirely different perspective on data visualization -- a designer's perspective. Simple concepts like color and more complex ideas like how to approach a large dataset are some of the things that I learned that I think are important for statisticians and the more technically-involved data people to know. I'll cover that stuff in later posts though.

    For now, I'd appreciate any comments on our visualization and any ideas on how to improve it. How would you visualize migration data?

  • San Francisco Police Department Incident Reporting and Analysis Tool

    November 15, 2007  |  Mapping

    I came across the San Francisco Police Department Incident and Reporting Tool, and at first glance it looked like Oakland Crimespotting with the map and incidents, but not as sleek or fluid.

    I was about to click away, but then I saw movement on the map. In addition to recent incidents, the map also has police unit tracking. You can see where certain units are at any given time as well as a video feed. That's pretty cool. However, it doesn't seem live, because every car is Officer Heinz, every car shows the same video, and the timestamp on the video shows November 2004. I guess it's just a demo or prototype right now.

    How cool would it be if that were live though? I can imagine plasma screens on the walls of every gang's central control station. Crime could be transformed forever.

  • News Flowing Through Moveable Type at The New York Times Building

    November 13, 2007  |  Data Art

    Every day during the summer I walked past "Moveable Type" in The New York Times lobby. Since my adviser was one of the people working on it, I had the privilege to see it up close before the actual opening.

    The picture is nice, but it's nothing like standing there and experiencing the news. It's especially nice to be in the middle of the two walls of panels (there's a panel behind the photographer) and you get bits and pieces of the day's paper and archive coming at you visually and um, auditorily. These bits and pieces are coming parsed from the paper in an intelligent (statistical) way. Listen to the NPR clip below to find out more. There's also a video on The Times page.

    Really, really great. Or as my adviser would say, "so sexy." If you're ever in the area, you should definitely take a look.

  • Many Eyes Now Has Better Mapping Visualization

    November 12, 2007  |  Mapping

    Many Eyes now has more detailed mapping functionality with the help of ESRI data. It was really only a matter of time before this happened. It's come to the point where I almost instantly think ESRI when I think maps--that and The Times maps department (who frequently uses ESRI data :). Anyways, this is pretty nice looking stuff. They've got bubbles, color coding, and multiple maps in matrix form (to compare).

    I didn't get a chance to look at the maps in depth, but one thing that I noticed is that the region bubbles are only labeled if they're at least a certain size. If they're smaller than that threshold, then it's just the bubble. I'm not sure what the threshold is, but I feel that it could be a bit lower so that more labeling can happen.

    There's also (of course) zoom-in, zoom-out, and panning-- features we have come to expect from online mapping applications. Zoom and pan gets a little sluggish when there are multiple maps, but the feature still feels pretty useful.

    [via Many Eyes]

  • US Demographics Visualizer Using Virtual Earth

    November 6, 2007  |  Mapping

    While on the topic of maps here's a Microsoft Virtual Earth mashup -- US Demographics Visualizer. It allows the user to map US census data by county. Map population, age, ethnicity, election results, and income. It's not quite as responsive as the Competitive Edge Explorer, but if you're looking to explore country-wide census data, then it's worth taking a look at.

  • Watch the Money Clock to See What You’ve Earned

    October 31, 2007  |  Ugly Charts

    money-clock

    Despite being surrounded with ads, this money clock was kind of, um, interesting. Put in how much you earn hourly, monthly, or annually, and it displays a running clock of dollars and cents for how much you've earned while watching the clock. It was amusing at first, and then kind of depressing after a few seconds.

    P.S. Happy Halloween!

  • Competitive Edge Explorer to Display Demographics

    October 26, 2007  |  Mapping

    The Competitive Edge Explorer is a mapping project from the MIT Laboratory for Mobile Learning. It's not just some hodge podge Google Maps mashup. The Explorer was written in Processing and has an intuitive and responsive user interface. As the user switches through datasets or zooms in and out, the map changes instantly. A total of eight datasets, including education, income levels, and housing costs, are available and can be selected at the same time to compare different areas according to different variables. The Explorer is yet another example for how maps offer the user a familiar visualization (just like timelines) for data.

    It would be especially cool if the Explorer was not just for Boston, but for the entire U.S. or even better, the world. Of course, finding that much data seems impossible now, but hey, it doesn't hurt to hope.

  • A Magazine Dedicated Entirely to Visualizing Something Useful

    October 19, 2007  |  Statistical Visualization

    GOOD Magazine is "media for people who give a damn."

    While so much of today's media is taking up our space, dumbing us down, and impeding our productivity, GOOD exists to add value. Through a print magazine, feature and documentary films, original multimedia content and local events, GOOD is providing a platform for the ideas, people, and businesses that are driving change in the world.

    My favorite part of the magazine is the transparency section, which is a series of graphics displaying data in one way or another. The graphic (or video, I guess) above shows what companies are paying to advertise in New York City. The Walmart graphic I talked about earlier is in the most recent GOOD.

    What if...

    What if instead of just a section, there was an entire magazine that was a transparency section? Now that would be awesome. It could be a mix of the media & design in GOOD with some real statistical graphics. It would be a complete visual experience with of course a short blurb on each, but the magazine would focus on the graphics to inspire change and improve awareness. (Picture good. Words.... baaaad.)

    Each issue would hover around a specific theme like the environment or economics; or even better, each issue could be more specific covering U.S. pollution or the decline of toy sales. I wonder how hard it would be to start something like that. Online first, print second? Is there a magazine already like this? If there isn't, there needs to be.

  • How Do You Visualize Time in a Drawing?

    October 18, 2007  |  Data Art

    Icastic has a fun (and growing) collection of (currently) 247 hand-drawings from contributors who have shown how they see time. Some are very detailed works of art while others are concise sketches. From words, objects, to people, the collection is a nice spectrum of imagination.

  • Presidential Nomination Polls With Smoothers

    October 11, 2007  |  Statistical Visualization

    Pollster Poll Results

    It almost feels like I see a new poll every day for who's leading in the presidential race. There's usually a good amount of fluctuation within a single poll with sampling margin of error and then of course the numbers vary across multiple polls. This can be confusing at times, so Pollster put all the results in one scatter plot. Then they stuck a smoother through all the points (for each candidate), and just like that, the viewer gets a general sense of how each candidate has been doing.

    Keep in mind that the amount of noise (or bumps in the curve) is going to vary depending on the type of estimation you use, so I wouldn't place the smaller curves under too much scrutiny. I'm not sure what method Pollster is using, but it's interesting to see the overall trends. Could we be looking at a double New Yorker election?

    Pollster also offers the raw poll data, so in case you want to have some of your own fun, there's data waiting for you.

    [via Mike Love]

  • World Freedom Atlas

    October 5, 2007  |  Mapping, Online Applications

    World Freedom Atlas is an online geo-visualization tool that shows a number of freedom indicators so to speak. For example, you can map by a number of indexes such as raw political rights score, civil liberties, political imprisonment, freedom of religion, freedom of speech, or torture. If I've counted correctly the data comes from 42 datasets divided into three categories:

    1. What It Is
    2. How To Get It
    3. What You Get

    What It Is covers data such as political rights and civil liberties while How To Get It is data on government structure and education system. I'm not really sure What You Get is though. There's GDP and some economic indexes, so it could be something like quality of life. Maybe someone can explain it better?

    The mapping and plots are pretty standard, but what stands out is the number of datasets that have been formatted in such a way the user is able to map things quickly and easily. It would be really cool if the data was explained a little better, so that I could "browse" the data a bit more efficiently, and even better, if there were some way to compare indicators against each other. Nevertheless, worth exploring a bit.

  • Find a Replacement for this Ugly Venn Diagram

    October 1, 2007  |  Ugly Charts

    autism-test-figure-2

    This venn diagram showing results from tests for Autism really seems to be making its rounds lately. It began with Igor Carron asking on his blog if there was a better way to display the data. Then Andrew Gelman put something of a redesign challenge up on his blog, and after Andrew, the challenge headed on over to Junk Charts. Redesigns are flying off the wall! From bar, to mosaic, to tornado charts, there's clearly many ways to represent data.

    Which one is the best? It's hard to say, because they all have advantages and disadvantages and the answer really depends on what point you're trying to drive home.

    However, I can find one advantage that the original venn diagram has over its redesigns -- it's intuitive for many people. John Venn introduced his diagram in 1881, over a century ago. That's a long time for people to adjust. People understand it. It makes sense. Yes, this particular venn is really ugly and probably didn't belong in a Powerpoint presentation, but doesn't it say something that re-designers were able to read it and use the data it provided? I think so.

    So in the spirit of Indexed, here's to you Mr. Venn.

    Venn Diagram Indexed

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