• What is Your Wine Personality Profile?

    August 25, 2009  |  Infographics

    TxWineCompendium

    The Texas in a Bottle guide to Texas Wine [pdf] reads:

    Ever listen to somebody describe a wine? They talk about it having "character" and "personality." To hear them tell it, wines are a lot like people. We've talked it over and came to a conclusion - they have it backwards. People are a lot like wines.

    And to that end, Go Texan Wine goes on to describe your personality based on what type of wine you prefer. Do you like Merlot? There's a mystical side to you, slightly mischievous, but that only makes you the life of the party.

    I'm difficult. I'm demanding. But oh, oh, oh, I am so worth it. What's your wine personality?

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • Detailed View of the Kennedy Family Tree

    August 24, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    kennedy-family-tree

    As far back as I can remember there's always been a mystique around the Kennedy family. It's almost like if you bear the Kennedy name, you're destined for greatness. With the recent passing of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Patterson Clark of The Washington Post maps out the famous family tree. The tree starts with the marriage of Joseph Patrick Kennedy and Rose Elizabeth Fitzgerald and branches out to current family members and what they do for a living.

    [via DataViz]

  • Caffeine vs Calories – Buzz vs Bulge

    August 21, 2009  |  Infographics

    buzzbulge_960

    David McCandless from Information is Beautiful plots the calories in popular beverages versus the amount of caffeine in them. At the bottom right of the plot are drinks low in calories and high in caffeine. At the opposite end, top left, are beverages of high calories and low in caffeine. Food items (on the left) and physical activity (on the right) provide context to the calories.

    [Thanks, Peter]

  • Mapping the Growth of the Internet – What Do You Think?

    August 20, 2009  |  Mapping

    exploding-internet

    I, uh, well. Hmm. Yeah. New Scientist recently compiled a list of visualizations exploring the growth of the Internet. Here they are in no particular order (plus the one above).
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  • Map/Territory Shows Augmented Reality of the Future

    August 19, 2009  |  Data Art

    Map/Territory, by designer Timo Arnall, is a concept video of what it might be like to interact with a map embedded in real life - not just on a phone or on a computer screen. Imagine a world where a flick of the wrist draws up all the information you need in real time and space. Check out the 30-second clip below:

    I really love stuff like this. Stuff like Map/Territory, Bruce Branit's holographic world, Microsoft's vision for 2019, or even the Starship Enterprise is simply beautiful. It's fun to imagine what the future might be like.

    Nevermind the how part. Technically speaking, I have no idea how Map/Territory would ever come to fruition, and I'm pretty sure Timo doesn't either, but who cares? While technical know-how is absolutely useful and completely necessary, sometimes you need imagination and creativity to push the boundaries of what's possible.

    [via O'Reilly Radar]

  • What DC Metro Routes are Most Common?

    August 18, 2009  |  Mapping

    metro-riderrship

    Greater Greater Washington maps rider flow for the DC Metro. As you might guess, the thicker the path, the greater the estimated number of riders in that given area.

    As the author notes, the data collection process was an unscientific one, so it should be taken with a few grains of salt, but this makes me wonder. These types of subway maps seem to be getting fairly common, in both the static and interactive/animated variety - but the visualization always seems to come from estimates.

    Have any metro systems released their full data? I am sure there are tons of data logs sitting somewhere, growing every time someone swipes their metro card or drops in a subway coin. And more importantly, are metro systems using these types of visualizations to figure out how to distribute trains at different times per day? Do they use something better?

    [Thanks, Jamie]

  • Religious Geography of the United States

    August 17, 2009  |  Mapping

    christian

    The U.S. Census Bureau doesn't ask questions about religion because of political issues involving separation of church and state, so we don't always get a very detailed view of religion. The Glenmary Research Center does collect this data, however.

    The Valparaiso geography department maps this detailed data, and the extensive collection of choropleth maps can be found here.
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  • Balance Life With the Media Diet Pyramid

    August 14, 2009  |  Infographics

    by_media_diet_f

    In the August issue of Wired are the New Rules for Highly Evolved Humans. On the cover is a picture of Brad Pitt wearing a bluetooth headset. Rule number 52 reads: "Ditch the headset. He can barely pull it off – and you're not him." Clearly these are confusing times, but you're in luck, because Wired has mapped out how you should properly deal with this new way of living. Stick to the new rules and the media diet above (by Jason Lee) and you're good as gold.

  • Pepsi and Coca-Cola Logo Design Over the Past Hundred Years

    August 13, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    504x_pepsivscoke

    There have actually been some subtle changes in the Coca-Cola logo but not nearly as dramatic as the Pepsi logos. I personally think the new Pepsi design is atrocious. They should have stopped in 1973.

    [via clusterflock & Daily Dish & Consumerist]
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  • Mapping Crime in Oxford Over Time

    August 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    crimemap

    Mentorn Media and Cimex Media, on behalf of BBC, explore crime patterns in Oxford over time. In a map, that I am happy to see is not a Google mashup, select different kinds of crime (e.g. violent crime, burglary & theft), or if you live in the area, compare different neighborhoods by postcode. The interactive also provides three animations for a week in crime - street violence, street robbery, and rowdy behavior - complemented by narration and explanation.

    One thing I'm not so sure about is the color scale. I think I would have gone with a yellow to red progression and left out the green since green usually means something positive. I'm also not sure what 'high' and 'low' levels of crime actually means in numbers. What do you think?

    [Thanks, Jack]

  • Choose Your Own Adventure – Most Likely You’ll Die

    August 11, 2009  |  Infographics

    adventure

    Remember those choose your own adventure books that you used to read as a kid? As you read through the book, you come to these points where you have to make a decision for the main character, and depending on what you chose, a tailored adventure would divulge itself. It always seemed like death was a common ending no matter what path you chose though.

    Michael Niggel of Hazard Creative took a look at Journey Under the Sea, and mapped out all possible paths. It turns out that death and unfavorable endings are in fact much more likely than the rest.

    That somehow seems wrong, no? I liken it to something like... even in your own fantasy, you die or end with an unfavorable outcome. Such is life, I suppose.

    View the full-size version here [PDF].

    [Thanks, Michael]

  • How People in America Spend Their Day

    August 10, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    spendtime

    From Shan Carter, Amanda Cox, Kevin Quealy, and Amy Schoenfeld of The New York Times is this new interactive stacked time series on how different groups in America spend their day. The data itself comes from the American Time Use Survey. The interactive has a similar feel to Martin Wattenberg's Baby Name Voyager, but it has the NYT pizazz that we've all come to know and love.
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  • What Britain Has Eaten the Past Three Decades

    August 6, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    eating

    The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) keeps an archive of what British citizens have consumed over the years. The Times Online, in collaboration with designer Marcin Ignac, visualizes this data in their recent interactive. Consumption is by grams with a percentage breakdown up top with the donut chart, and a weekly average (for each year) on the bottom. The donut chart updates when you scroll over a bar in the time series chart. Very nice work I think. What do you think?

  • Track Presidential Approval Ratings and Compare to Past

    August 5, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    tracker-compare

    From William Couch, Kristen Novak, Michelle Price and Joshua Hatch of USA Today, this tracker tool lets you compare ratings of past current and past presidents according to Gallup polls.
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  • Step-by-Step Guide On How to Get Shot by the Sartorialist

    August 4, 2009  |  Infographics

    how-to-get-shot-by-sartorialist

    The Sartorialist is a unique fashion blog that highlights people's hot styles on the street. I'm pretty sure there's very little overlap with its readers and FlowingData's, but maybe I'm wrong. The above infographic shows how you can get shot by the Sartorialist. I'm all over it.

    [Thanks, @MacDivaONA]

  • Watch the Ebb and Flow of Melbourne Trains

    August 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Similar to other visualizations showing location (e.g. Cabspotting, Britain From Above), this one from Australia-based data visualization group, Flink Labs, shows the ebb and flow of Melbourne trains over the course of a single weekday using the Melbourne train schedule as the data.
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  • Compare What Your Senators and Reps are Talking About With Congress Speaks

    July 31, 2009  |  Infographics

    congress-speaks

    There's a lot of talking in congressional meetings, but what are your state senators and representatives talking about? Design group Periscopic explores what congress men and women said from 2007 to 2008 in this tongue-in-cheek comparison tool with talking heads. The best part about the tool is that behind the humor is actually something useful.

    Compare word distributions of senators, of states, of a senator to a state, or representatives, so on and so forth. We get breakdowns by gender, number of words spoken, and by state. All data come from public records.

    [via @krees]

  • Animated Infographics for the Eat Local, Eat Real Campaign

    July 29, 2009  |  Infographics

    I love food. I love infographics. Put them together, and this is what you get. As part of the Eat Local, Eat Real campaign, this infographic video (below), produced by Sons and Daughters and Crush of Toronto, argues why we should eat local.
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  • Suicides by Location on the Golden Gate Bridge

    July 28, 2009  |  Infographics

    mn_suicide30_loc_tt

    This graphic from SF Gate is a good four years old, well before I knew what an infographic was, but just because it's old doesn't mean it's not interesting. Here we see San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and the "sad tally" of 1,218 known suicides by location. Each black square represents a person who has taken his or her life and 128 light poles are used as reference points.

    The east side of the bridge, where most of the suicides occurred, has a pedestrian walkway. The first suicide was just 10 weeks after the bridge opened in 1937.

    [Thanks, Justin]

  • Gauge Your Distraction While You Text and Drive in the Distracted Driving Game

    July 27, 2009  |  Infographics

    Picture 1

    From Gabriel Dance, Tom Jackson, and Aaron Pilhofer of the New York Times is this game to gauge your distraction while you're texting on the road. Yes. It's fun AND educational. Here's how it works.

    You're in a car with a driver's point of view. You're driving on a freeway or road with a ridiculous number of gates. There are six of them, and as you approach the gates, one will open, and you have select that open gate by pressing the right number. After a few seconds of practice, you'll receive a text message on the screen that asks a question. You have to reply while still selecting the correct gates as they pass.
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