• What DC Metro Routes are Most Common?

    August 18, 2009  |  Mapping

    metro-riderrship

    Greater Greater Washington maps rider flow for the DC Metro. As you might guess, the thicker the path, the greater the estimated number of riders in that given area.

    As the author notes, the data collection process was an unscientific one, so it should be taken with a few grains of salt, but this makes me wonder. These types of subway maps seem to be getting fairly common, in both the static and interactive/animated variety - but the visualization always seems to come from estimates.

    Have any metro systems released their full data? I am sure there are tons of data logs sitting somewhere, growing every time someone swipes their metro card or drops in a subway coin. And more importantly, are metro systems using these types of visualizations to figure out how to distribute trains at different times per day? Do they use something better?

    [Thanks, Jamie]

  • Religious Geography of the United States

    August 17, 2009  |  Mapping

    christian

    The U.S. Census Bureau doesn't ask questions about religion because of political issues involving separation of church and state, so we don't always get a very detailed view of religion. The Glenmary Research Center does collect this data, however.

    The Valparaiso geography department maps this detailed data, and the extensive collection of choropleth maps can be found here.
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  • Balance Life With the Media Diet Pyramid

    August 14, 2009  |  Infographics

    by_media_diet_f

    In the August issue of Wired are the New Rules for Highly Evolved Humans. On the cover is a picture of Brad Pitt wearing a bluetooth headset. Rule number 52 reads: "Ditch the headset. He can barely pull it off – and you're not him." Clearly these are confusing times, but you're in luck, because Wired has mapped out how you should properly deal with this new way of living. Stick to the new rules and the media diet above (by Jason Lee) and you're good as gold.

  • Pepsi and Coca-Cola Logo Design Over the Past Hundred Years

    August 13, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    504x_pepsivscoke

    There have actually been some subtle changes in the Coca-Cola logo but not nearly as dramatic as the Pepsi logos. I personally think the new Pepsi design is atrocious. They should have stopped in 1973.

    [via clusterflock & Daily Dish & Consumerist]
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  • Mapping Crime in Oxford Over Time

    August 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    crimemap

    Mentorn Media and Cimex Media, on behalf of BBC, explore crime patterns in Oxford over time. In a map, that I am happy to see is not a Google mashup, select different kinds of crime (e.g. violent crime, burglary & theft), or if you live in the area, compare different neighborhoods by postcode. The interactive also provides three animations for a week in crime - street violence, street robbery, and rowdy behavior - complemented by narration and explanation.

    One thing I'm not so sure about is the color scale. I think I would have gone with a yellow to red progression and left out the green since green usually means something positive. I'm also not sure what 'high' and 'low' levels of crime actually means in numbers. What do you think?

    [Thanks, Jack]

  • Choose Your Own Adventure – Most Likely You’ll Die

    August 11, 2009  |  Infographics

    adventure

    Remember those choose your own adventure books that you used to read as a kid? As you read through the book, you come to these points where you have to make a decision for the main character, and depending on what you chose, a tailored adventure would divulge itself. It always seemed like death was a common ending no matter what path you chose though.

    Michael Niggel of Hazard Creative took a look at Journey Under the Sea, and mapped out all possible paths. It turns out that death and unfavorable endings are in fact much more likely than the rest.

    That somehow seems wrong, no? I liken it to something like... even in your own fantasy, you die or end with an unfavorable outcome. Such is life, I suppose.

    View the full-size version here [PDF].

    [Thanks, Michael]

  • How People in America Spend Their Day

    August 10, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    spendtime

    From Shan Carter, Amanda Cox, Kevin Quealy, and Amy Schoenfeld of The New York Times is this new interactive stacked time series on how different groups in America spend their day. The data itself comes from the American Time Use Survey. The interactive has a similar feel to Martin Wattenberg's Baby Name Voyager, but it has the NYT pizazz that we've all come to know and love.
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  • What Britain Has Eaten the Past Three Decades

    August 6, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    eating

    The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) keeps an archive of what British citizens have consumed over the years. The Times Online, in collaboration with designer Marcin Ignac, visualizes this data in their recent interactive. Consumption is by grams with a percentage breakdown up top with the donut chart, and a weekly average (for each year) on the bottom. The donut chart updates when you scroll over a bar in the time series chart. Very nice work I think. What do you think?

  • Track Presidential Approval Ratings and Compare to Past

    August 5, 2009  |  Statistical Visualization

    tracker-compare

    From William Couch, Kristen Novak, Michelle Price and Joshua Hatch of USA Today, this tracker tool lets you compare ratings of past current and past presidents according to Gallup polls.
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  • Step-by-Step Guide On How to Get Shot by the Sartorialist

    August 4, 2009  |  Infographics

    how-to-get-shot-by-sartorialist

    The Sartorialist is a unique fashion blog that highlights people's hot styles on the street. I'm pretty sure there's very little overlap with its readers and FlowingData's, but maybe I'm wrong. The above infographic shows how you can get shot by the Sartorialist. I'm all over it.

    [Thanks, @MacDivaONA]

  • Watch the Ebb and Flow of Melbourne Trains

    August 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Similar to other visualizations showing location (e.g. Cabspotting, Britain From Above), this one from Australia-based data visualization group, Flink Labs, shows the ebb and flow of Melbourne trains over the course of a single weekday using the Melbourne train schedule as the data.
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  • Compare What Your Senators and Reps are Talking About With Congress Speaks

    July 31, 2009  |  Infographics

    congress-speaks

    There's a lot of talking in congressional meetings, but what are your state senators and representatives talking about? Design group Periscopic explores what congress men and women said from 2007 to 2008 in this tongue-in-cheek comparison tool with talking heads. The best part about the tool is that behind the humor is actually something useful.

    Compare word distributions of senators, of states, of a senator to a state, or representatives, so on and so forth. We get breakdowns by gender, number of words spoken, and by state. All data come from public records.

    [via @krees]

  • Animated Infographics for the Eat Local, Eat Real Campaign

    July 29, 2009  |  Infographics

    I love food. I love infographics. Put them together, and this is what you get. As part of the Eat Local, Eat Real campaign, this infographic video (below), produced by Sons and Daughters and Crush of Toronto, argues why we should eat local.
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  • Suicides by Location on the Golden Gate Bridge

    July 28, 2009  |  Infographics

    mn_suicide30_loc_tt

    This graphic from SF Gate is a good four years old, well before I knew what an infographic was, but just because it's old doesn't mean it's not interesting. Here we see San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and the "sad tally" of 1,218 known suicides by location. Each black square represents a person who has taken his or her life and 128 light poles are used as reference points.

    The east side of the bridge, where most of the suicides occurred, has a pedestrian walkway. The first suicide was just 10 weeks after the bridge opened in 1937.

    [Thanks, Justin]

  • Gauge Your Distraction While You Text and Drive in the Distracted Driving Game

    July 27, 2009  |  Infographics

    Picture 1

    From Gabriel Dance, Tom Jackson, and Aaron Pilhofer of the New York Times is this game to gauge your distraction while you're texting on the road. Yes. It's fun AND educational. Here's how it works.

    You're in a car with a driver's point of view. You're driving on a freeway or road with a ridiculous number of gates. There are six of them, and as you approach the gates, one will open, and you have select that open gate by pressing the right number. After a few seconds of practice, you'll receive a text message on the screen that asks a question. You have to reply while still selecting the correct gates as they pass.
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  • Three Ingredients to Make the Perfect Business

    July 24, 2009  |  Misc. Visualization

    happy-business-588x592

    Thanks to Jessica Hagy and her Indexed project, we've seen lots of graphs and venn diagrams to communicate ideas outside of data. Some are bad and others are good. Here's one of the good ones. Bud Caddell shows what it takes to make the perfect business, or more generally, just about everyone's dream - to get paid for what you're good at and love to do. Get the poster version of the graphic here.

    [via dataviz]

  • Death and Taxes Poster 2010 – 50% Off for FlowingData Readers

    July 23, 2009  |  Infographics

    Jess Bachman of WallStats just released his annual Death and Taxes Poster for 2010. For those unfamiliar, the poster is a graphical breakdown of the United States federal budget.
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  • Comparing the Human and Chimpanzee Genomes

    July 21, 2009  |  Infographics

    genome

    As part of the Explore Evolution exhibit at the University of Nebraska State Museum, Judy Diamond displays a segment of the human genome in line with that of the chimpanzee that matches very closely. The point is to show how similar two are with the few differences represented by a drawing of a man, distinguished geneticist Svante Paabo.
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  • Why Are Cheap Airlines So Cheap?

    July 16, 2009  |  Infographics

    airlines

    5W Graphics, whose work you've seen by now, compares lower-cost airlines to "regular" airlines. The infographic is from the Spain group, so the focus is on Eurpoean airlines. Apparently the concept of low fair airlines (LFAs) is fairly new in Europe, only starting in 1990 with Ryanair while Southwest Airlines was founded in 1970. I'm more of a JetBlue guy myself. I cherish my legroom and in-flight entertainment.

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • How Does the Average Consumer Spend His Money?

    July 14, 2009  |  Infographics

    wheredidthemoneygo

    Add another graphic to the list of ways to show consumer spending. Visual Economics displays data from the most recent spending survey (April 2009) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare this to last year's survey results via an NYT interactive.

    The biggest difference I'm seeing is that between last year's spending on housing (42%) and this year (34%). Maybe that's why my mother-in-law keeps telling me it's a good time to buy a house. Do you notice anything interesting?

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