• Map and report data with InstantAtlas

    April 2, 2010  |  Mapping, Software

    As you know, there's this big wave of transparency going on right now, and many organizations want to do more than just post a bunch of spreadsheets. They actually want to visualize it and share their data in a way that can be consumed by the general public. InstantAtlas aims to make that easy - without any code.
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  • Mapping GitHub – a network of collaborative coders

    March 31, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    GitHub is a large community where coders can collaborate on software development projects. People check code in and out, make edits, etc. Franck Cuny maps this community (with Gephi), based on information in thousands of user profiles.
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  • Japan, the strange country, in motion graphics

    March 30, 2010  |  Infographics

    Design student Kenichi Tanaka animates the history of Japan for his final thesis project.

    He pokes fun at his culture a little bit there in the beginning, yeah? I feel like something is getting lost in translation.

    Update: The English version was taken down, unfortunately. Here's the original Japanese version. The graphics are still in English, so you can probably understand most of it without the narration.

    [Thanks, @pims]

  • March Madness Bracketology

    March 30, 2010  |  Statistical Visualization

    ncaa.jpg.scaled.1000

    The Final Four is just about here. Who's going to win it all? It's anyone's guess at this point, but what we can do while we wait is examine who's won in the past. Leonardo Aranda takes a gander at who has won in each round since 1985, by ranking, with a color-coded bracket that resembles a stacked area chart.

    I think if he used just two colors per corner (instead of entire palettes) and brightness indicating rank, it might be a bit easier to read in the first rounds. At the very least, you could find the Cinderella stories quicker, which is the most exciting part of the tournament a lot of the time.

    I still like the concept though. It reminds me of Stephen's crayon colors.

    See the full-sized version here.

    Who's your money on?

    [Thanks, Leonardo]

  • Wear the weather as a bracelet

    March 26, 2010  |  Data Art

    We all know that data is the new sexy, so it's only natural for data to find its way into jewelry. This weather bracelet represents a year of temperatures and rain. Peak heights are mapped to minimum and maximum daily temperatures, and the holes in the sides represent weekly rainfall.
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  • What your email says about your finances

    March 25, 2010  |  Infographics

    This graphic shows average debt categorized by email provider. Average age for Gmail users is 33 and 47 for Comcast. Yeah, that sounds about right.
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  • The Growing Plague that is Spam

    March 24, 2010  |  Infographics

    Spam sucks. We all hate it, but no matter how good the filter, something always seems to get through. Want some cheap Vi4gr4? I can tell you where to get it. New Scientist takes a look at the spamdemic. It costs very little to send tens of thousands of emails, but it only takes a tiny percentage of idiots to make it all worth it for spammers.

    Seriously - who falls for these things?

    • oRo1exWatches $200 Off - Each Free Shipping Watch, 2 Days Left, Snap UP! rkru kp
    • USA: ~Percocent~Ritalin best sale !!
    • ~~~Good day :~~~Vicodi~ _ P~ercocet~~~
    • 100 percent male power
    • Heartfelt Plea from Supreme Master Ching Hai: Be Organic Vegan and Loving Kindness for Saving Lives

    I have to admit my spam folder does supply brief moments of amusement every now and then, but come on.

    [via Data Mining]

  • Poll: What do you mostly use visualization for?

    March 23, 2010  |  Polls, Visualization

    We use visualization for a lot of different things, and its purpose varies person-to-person. Some use it to report the news. Others use it purely for analysis and decision-making. Some even use it for artistic expression. What do you use visualization for? Select the answer that best fits you below. If you select "other," let us know what that means in the comments.

    {democracy:13}
  • March Madness by the numbers

    March 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    March Madness final620

    I didn't fill out my bracket this year, so it's not nearly as exciting for me. I don't think that's stopped thousands of bars across the country from cleaning house though.

    [FastCompany via Good]

  • Notes from Interactive Infographics #interinfo #sxsw

    March 17, 2010  |  Infographics, News

    Yesterday was the Interactive Infographics panel at South by Southwest, and if Twitter is any indication of how it went, I'd say the panel had a captivated audience. I wouldn't expect anything less from the four panelists, Ben Fry (Processing), Shan Carter (NYT), Casey Caplowe (Good), and Eric Rodenbeck (Stamen)

    Unfortunately, I didn't get to attend, but luckily I was able to follow the play-by-play on Livefyre (sort of a cross between chat and forum) along with some excellent notes from @jpmarcum and @bryanconnor. Here are the important bits I was able to glean.

    The bulk of the time was spent showcasing the work from the four groups. I think you can find most of the projects through FlowingData. Just use the search form on the bottom right of this page. The good stuff came towards the end during the Q&A.
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  • Use your skills to help others

    March 17, 2010  |  Infographics

    Screen shot 2011-02-16 at 11.54.00 PM

    Designer Christopher Harrell talks about, with a dose of various embedded graphics, pointing your skills toward something good. Harrell's video was one of the winners in the What Matters to You scholarship competition for Vancouver Film School. It looks like home video, but that just adds to the charm.
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  • Statistical Atlas from the ninth Census in 1870

    March 16, 2010  |  Statistical Visualization

    In 1870, Francis Walker oversaw publication of the United States' first Statistical Atlas, based on data from the ninth Census. It was a big moment for statistics in the United States as the atlas provided a way to compare data on a national level using maps and statistical graphics.

    What continues to amaze me about these old illustrations is the detail - all done by hand. That's ridiculous. The kicker is that a lot of this stuff looks way better than a lot of what we see nowadays. Here are some selections from the 1870 atlas.
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  • Challenge: Let’s do something with these 3-D pyramids

    March 12, 2010  |  Ugly Charts

    pyramid

    Here's the idea. The government recommends a diet for healthy living (right pyramid), but at the same time there are billions of dollars of lopsided subsidies (left pyramid) whose distribution doesn't look anything like the former. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) used the above 3-d pyramids to present this information.

    Interesting point. Funky presentation. Discuss (remakes highly recommended).

    [via The Consumerist]

  • wefeelfine-cover

    Review: We Feel Fine (the book) by Kamvar and Harris

    We Feel Fine, by Sep Kamvar and Jonathan Harris, is a selection of some of the best entries from the database of 12 million emotions, along with some insights into the growing dataset.
  • What burger chain reigns supreme?

    March 10, 2010  |  Mapping

    alone

    In a follow up to his McDonald's map, Stephen Von Worley of Weather Sealed maps the dominating burger chains across the United States. McDonald's obviously has a stronghold in a lot of areas but not all of them. Most noticeable is Sonic Drive-in with over 900 restaurants in Texas alone. Personally, I'm rooting for Carl's Jr. and In-n-Out.

    [via We Love Datavis]

  • Canada: the country that pees together stays together

    March 9, 2010  |  Statistical Visualization

    flush_game

    EPCOR, the water utility company that runs the fountains up in Edmonton, Canada released this graph yesterday. It's water consumption during the Olympic gold medal hockey game, overlaying consumption of the previous day. How much do Canadians love their hockey? A lot.

    The first period ends. Time to pee. The second period ends. Time to pee. The third period ends. Time to pee. Consumption goes way down when Canada wins and during the medal ceremony.

    Finally, when it's all said and done, the rest of the country can relieve itself, figuratively and literally.

    [via contrarian | thanks, @statpumpkin]

  • Looking Inside a Bus Routing Algorithm

    March 9, 2010  |  Mapping

    In an effort to put transit data from the Toronto Transit Committee to better use, MyTTC provides a trip planner to help you find the best route from point A to point B. This video, compete with smart arses sitting on a couch, provides a peek into how the underlying algorithm works.

    [Thanks, Canna]

  • Edward Tufte will serve on Recovery Independent Advisory Panel

    March 8, 2010  |  Visualization

    Big news for all you Edward Tufte fanboys and girls. He will be joining the Recovery Independent Advisory Panel who will advise The Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board. The Board's purpose is to track and explain how the $787 billion in stimulus funds is being put to use.

    I'm doing this because I like accountability and transparency, and I believe in public service. And it is the complete opposite of everything else I do. Maybe I'll learn something. The practical consequence is that I will probably go to Washington several days each month, in addition to whatever homework and phone meetings are necessary.

    Whether Tufte will have a direct impact on graphs like these, I'm not so sure, but it certainly won't hurt. I mean the man does know a thing or two about dispersing information.

    [Thanks, Yuri and @tbeauchamp]

  • How Genetics Works

    March 5, 2010  |  Misc. Visualization

    13068_full

    Simple yet effective. Any questions? [via 9gag | Thanks, Barry]

  • Where Bars Trump Grocery Stores

    March 2, 2010  |  Mapping

    Bars and groceries

    FloatingSheep, a fun geography blog, looks at the beer belly of America. One maps shows total number of bars, but the interesting map is the one above. Red dots represent locations where there are more bars than grocery stores, based on results from the Google Maps API. The Midwest takes their drinking seriously.

    Of course there are plenty of possible explanations for the distribution. Maybe people get all their food from superstores like Walmart in the red dot areas, so there are fewer gigantic stores than there are small local bars.

    Then again, the FloatingSheep guys did their homework and found, according to Census, that the number of drinking places in those red dots are really skewed compare to the average. So it's also possible that area of the country just likes to drink a lot.

    Anyone who lives in the area care to confirm? I expect your comment to be filled with typos and make very little sense. And maybe smell like garbage.

    [Thanks, Michael]

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