• Audio visualizer made with matrix of fire

    April 25, 2014  |  Data Art

    The Pyro Board is a matrix of 2,500 flames that have controllable intensity, which can be used as an audio visualizer. Yeah, really. Just watch the video below.

    [via Colossal]

  • Detailed map of baseball fandom

    April 24, 2014  |  Mapping

    Baseball fandom in SoCal

    For the past couple of sports seasons, Facebook mapped the most liked team by county. They did it for football (NFL), the NCAA basketball tournament, and baseball (MLB). Although generalized, the maps provide a view of sports fandom and people clusters across the country, and plus you know, they're fun.

    The Upshot used the same like data, provided by Facebook, and mapped it at the ZIP code level. Then they took it a step further and looked closer at regional rivalries, such as Cubs and White Sox, Yankees and Red Sox, and Dodgers and Angels. Be sure to scroll down to Mets versus Phillies. They incorporated a tidbit of Josh Katz's dialect map.

    The Upshot is off to an impressive start. It's almost as if The New York Times people have been doing this for a while. [via @KevinQ]

  • Where people bike and run, worldwide

    April 24, 2014  |  Mapping

    Strava activity maps

    Remember those running maps I made with limited data from RunKeeper? Strava, which also provides an app to track your runs and bike rides, has a much more expansive version of popular paths around the world. Their dataset includes over 77 million rides and 19 million runs, summing to about 220 billion data points. Just pan and zoom to your area of interest, and there you go.

  • Music preference by region

    April 22, 2014  |  Mapping

    Music in America

    Movoto mapped music preference for various genres, across the United States.

    We calculated musical taste scores using data from the National Endowment of the Arts, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (via the Martin Prosperity Institute) and state level music preferences from Wikipedia. The scores include music genre preference survey data and genre performer concentrations by metro, weighted by that metro's influence on the music scene. We took the scores for each metro and used a spatial statistics method called nearest neighbors to create the heatmap.

  • How people die in America

    April 21, 2014  |  Statistical Visualization

    American mortality

    Matthew Klein for Bloomberg View explored mortality in America through a slidedeck of charts. The animations in between each slide grows tedious, but the topics covered, going beyond just national mortality rate, are worth browsing. (Although, can someone tell me why the female mortality rate rose between the 1970s and 2000? I know there's a perfectly valid reason behind the trend, but I can't remember.)

    The data itself is also worth your time, in case you're looking for a side project. It comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and spans 1968 through 2010.

    I can tell you from experience the data query process isn't the smoothest experience — as much as you can expect from a government site, I guess. That said, the amount of data, with a variety of demographic breakdowns and categorizations, can make for plenty of worthwhile projects. Highly recommended.

  • Where nobody lives

    April 18, 2014  |  Mapping

    Where nobody lives

    We've seen the map of where everyone lives. Now here's the reverse of that by Nik Freeman: where nobody lives in the United States.

    A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

    See also Stephen Von Worley's map from a couple years ago, which shows blocks in the US with only one person per square mile.

  • Weird stacked area map thing

    April 16, 2014  |  Ugly Charts

    This chart-map-looking thing from Nightly News is making the rounds, and it's not good. I'm opening the comments below for critique so that you can release your angst. Signed copy of Data Points goes to a randomly selected commenter the end of this week. Have at it.

    Changing face

  • Five decades of warm and cold weather anomalies

    April 14, 2014  |  Statistical Visualization

    Weather anomalies

    This year's polar vortex churned up some global warming skeptics, but as we know, it's more useful to look at trends over significant spans of time than isolated events. And, when you do look at a trend, it's useful to have a proper baseline to compare against.

    To this end, Enigma.io compared warm weather anomalies against cold weather anomalies, from 1964 to 2013. That is, they counted the number of days per year that were warmer than expected and the days it was colder than expected.

    An animated map leads the post, but the meat is in the time series. There's a clear trend towards more warm.

    Since 1964, the proportion of warm and strong warm anomalies has risen from about 42% of the total to almost 67% of the total – an average increase of 0.5% per year. This trend, fitted with a generalized linear model, accounts for 40% of the year-to-year variation in warm versus cold anomalies, and is highly significant with a p-value approaching 0.0. Though we remain cautious about making predictions based on this model, it suggests that this yearly proportion of warm anomalies will regularly fall above 70% in the 2030's.

    Explore in full or download the data and analyze yourself. Nice work. [Thanks, Dan]

  • High-detail maps with Disser

    April 10, 2014  |  Mapping

    Detailed building map

    Open data consultancy Conveyal released Disser, a command-line tool to disaggregate geographic data to show more details. For example, we've seen data represented with uniformly distributed dots to represent populations, which is fine for a zoomed out view. However, when you get in close, it can be useful to see distributions more accurately represented.

    If the goal of disaggregation is to make a reasonable guess at the data in its pre-aggregated form, we've done an okay job. There's an obvious flaw with this map, though. People aren't evenly distributed over a block — they're concentrated into residential buildings.

    So Disser combines datasets of different granularity, so that you can see spreads and concentrations that are closer to real life.

  • Independent coffee shops and community

    April 9, 2014  |  Mapping

    Independent coffee shops

    As part of the You Are Here project from the MIT Media Lab, an exploration of independent coffee shops in San Francisco:

    Independent coffee shops are positive markers of a living community. They function as social spaces, urban offices, and places to see the world go by. Communities are often formed by having spaces in which people can have casual interactions, and local and walkable coffee shops create those conditions, not only in the coffee shop themselves, but on the sidewalks around them. We use maps to know where these coffee shop communities exist and where, by placing new coffee shops, we can help form them.

    Each dot is a coffee shop, and the shaded spots around the dot represent the areas nearest each shop. It's an interesting, more granular contrast to coffee chain geography and provides a better sense of a city's layout.

    See also the same idea applied to Cambridge. I imagine there are more cities to come, as the data is gleaned from the Google Places and Google Distance Matrix APIs.

  • Regional macrobrews

    April 7, 2014  |  Mapping

    Beer tweeting

    FloatingSheep pointed their Twitter geography towards beer (and wine).

    From Sam Adams in New England to Yuengling in Pennsylvania to Grain Belt and Schlitz in the upper Midwest, these beers are quite clearly associated with particular places. Other beers, like Hudepohl and Goose Island are interesting in that they stretch out from their places of origin -- Cincinnati and Chicago, respectively -- to encompass a much broader region where there tend to be fewer regionally-specific competitors, at least historically. On the other hand, beers like Lone Star, Corona and Dos Equis tend to have significant overlap in their regional preferences, with all three having some level of dominance along the US-Mexico border region, but with major competition between these brands in both Arizona and Texas.

    This of course excludes the increased appreciation for craft beer, as there isn't enough data for significant microbrewery results.

  • Open access to 20,000 maps from NYPL

    April 3, 2014  |  Mapping

    Maps from NYPL

    The New York Public Library announced open access to 20,000 maps, making them free to download and use.

    The Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division is very proud to announce the release of more than 20,000 cartographic works as high resolution downloads. We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions.* To the extent that some jurisdictions grant NYPL an additional copyright in the digital reproductions of these maps, NYPL is distributing these images under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. The maps can be viewed through the New York Public Library's Digital Collections page, and downloaded (!), through the Map Warper

    Begin your journey.

  • Planetary layer cake

    April 2, 2014  |  Mapping

    Planetary layer cake

    From Cakecrumbs, a product that helps you learn while you eat: planetary layer cakes. The graduate student slash baker hobbyist's sister asked if she could make one, and at first she thought it couldn't be done. But then she thought more about it.

    I spent the rest of the afternoon thinking about it. I don’t admit defeat. Ever. But especially not with cake. Nothing is impossible is pretty much my baking motto, so to say this cake was impossible left me feeling weird. There had to be a way. A way that didn't involve carving or crumbing the cake. I kept mulling it over until I had a breakthrough.

    See how it was done.

  • Exponential water tank

    March 31, 2014  |  Infographics

    Exponential water tank

    Hibai Unzueta, based on a paper by Albert Bartlett, demonstrates exponential growth with a simple animation. It depicts a man standing in a tank with finite capacity and water rising slowly, but at an exponential rate.

    Our brains are wired to predict future behaviour based on past behaviour (see here). But what happens when something growths exponentially? For a long time, the numbers are so little in relation to the scale that we hardly see the changes. But even at moderate growth rates exponential functions reach a point where the numbers grow too fast. Once we confirm that our predictions about the future have failed, very little time to react may be left.

    All looks safe at first, because the water rises so slowly, but it seems to rise all of a sudden. Oh, the suspense. What will happen to cartoon pixel man?

  • Centuries of European border changes

    March 28, 2014  |  Mapping

    The Centennia Historical Atlas is a program that shows you border changes in Europe and the Middle East, from the 11th century to the present. It's meant as an educational tool. The video below is the animated map from the program set to climactic music from the movie Inception.

    Now contrast that to the original promotional video for Centennia. I'm amused. [via @sogrady]

  • Smoking rates and income

    March 27, 2014  |  Mapping

    Smoking rates

    Based on a study on smoking prevalence from 1996 to 2012, a map by The New York Times shows the results. Smoking rates among men and women have declined overall over the years, but there are still relatively high rates in many areas of the country, which appears to correlate with income. Lower income tends towards higher smoking rates.

    That would explain why the map above looks similar to a county-level map for median household income, which probably interacts with life spans by county somehow.

  • Reconstructing Google Streetview as a point cloud

    March 26, 2014  |  Mapping

    Patricio Gonzalez Vivo, an MFA Design & Technology student, scraped depth from Google Streetview and then reconstructed it in openFrameworks. The result is Point Cloud City. See it in action in the video below.

    Dreamlike.

    Now I'm curious what else can be gleaned from this data, because this essentially means you could get really detailed data about the makeup of places, down to the window of a building. Although I don't imagine Google will let this stay so accessible for long. [Thanks, @pixelbeat]

  • Human heartbeat

    March 26, 2014  |  Data Art

    Human heart beat

    Jen Lowe tracks her heart rate with a Basis watch, and she's showing the last 24 hours of that data in One Human Heartbeat.

    Basis doesn't provide an open API, so I access the data using a variation of this code. The heartrate you see is from 24 hours ago. This is because the data can only be accessed via usb connection. Twice a day I connect the watch and upload my latest heartrates to the database. I've been doing this for 33 days now.

    It's March 25, 2014, and statistics say I have about 16452 days left.

    On the surface, it's just a pulsating light on a screen, but somehow it feels like more than that. The countdown aspect makes me uneasy, as if I were watching a ticker on someone's life, or my own even. I want to keep watching though, because it continues to pulsate. It's hopeful.

  • Level of road grid

    March 25, 2014  |  Mapping

    Road orientation

    Seth Kadish looked at the road network of several major counties and estimated the directions the streets run. The result is a set of charts that shows which cities use a grid system and those that don't.

    If you're like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you'll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.

    Whoa, Charlotte.

    Since the original, Kadish has added more counties and a handful of international cities.

  • Graph TV shows ratings by episode

    March 24, 2014  |  Statistical Visualization

    Ratings for The Office

    Kevin Wu made a straightforward interactive that lets you see IMDB television ratings over time, per episode and by season.
    Continue Reading

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