• Wireless networks in the physical world

    June 24, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    wireless networks

    For the most part, you go about your day-to-day with little knowledge of all the bits and networks you walk past or intersect with. Designer Timo Arnall visualizes these wireless networks of WiFi, bluetooth, etc. in the physical world (video below). It's a simple idea. As we move through the landscapes, white dashed circles move around buildings with WiFi and people carrying mobile gadgets. Continue Reading

  • Stanley Cup winners and losers

    June 10, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Stanley Cup winners and losers

    Speaking of sports most Americans know nothing about, Robby Macdonell visualizes NHL Stanley Cup competitors in his experiment with HTML5. The interactive shows winners and losers since 1927. Teams are shown up top and years are on the bottom. Mouse over stuff, and connecting lines show past appearances if you are looking at a team, or the winner and loser of a year, if you are looking at the bottom.

    See Robby's post for the full skinny on how he did it.

    Congratulations to the Chicago Blackhawks in their recent win. You've done Obama proud.

    [via the forums]

  • Interactive World Cup schedule

    June 10, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Interactive World Cup schedule

    I was born in and live in the United States, so to me football is a bunch of big guys in full armor trying to tackle each other. To the rest of the world though, all eyes are on the World Cup, starting June 11. So this is for you, international readers (and maybe one or two Americans). Marca has an interactive World Cup schedule so you can make sure not to miss any important matches. Mouse over a date, a team, a group/stage, or cities/stadiums to focus on the matches you want.

    [Thanks, Judi]

  • Europe’s web of debt

    June 8, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Europe's web of debt

    While the US has its own problems with debt somewhere in the range of $13 trillion, European countries have got some issues too. It seems like everyone owes something these days.

    [Thanks, Tom]

  • Elastic Lists code open-sourced

    May 26, 2010  |  Network Visualization, Software

    Moritz Stefaner, whose work we've seen a few times here on FD, just released his code for Elastic Lists (in Actionscript).

    For those unfamiliar, Elastic Lists builds on the idea of faceted browsing, which lets you sift through data with multiple filters. Think of when you search for an item on Amazon. In the initial results, filters for price, brand, and category rest in the sidebar. Similarly, Elastic Lists lets you browse data on multiple categories, but with more visual cues and animated transitions.
    Continue Reading

  • Most influential people on Twitter – Cosmic 140

    May 24, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Information Architects just released their annual Web Trends Map, but it's not about the subway and URLs this time around. Instead, it focuses on the 140 most influential Twitter users - the Cosmic 140 - based on list volume. Here are your top five:

    1. Barack Obama (@BarackObama)
    2. Lady Gaga (@ladygaga)
    3. CNN Breaking News (@cnnbrk)
    4. Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13)
    5. Pete Cashmore (@mashable)

    How about those American values?

    As you can guess from the name, the layout and design revolve around a solar system metaphor. Founders rest in the middle, influential tweeters rest on the outer orbits, and followers are shown with surrounding edges. The longer a person has been a Twitter user, the closer to the middle he, she, or the company appears. The more a person is listed, the larger the white circle, and the more followers, the larger the surrounding transparent circle. Finally, people are placed on the 360° by category (e.g. entertainment or politics).
    Continue Reading

  • Conversational Twitter threads visualized

    April 26, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Add another piece to the ever-growing list of Twitter visualizations. What makes Moritz Stefaner's Revisit different is that it focuses on the conversational threads between Twitter users over time. Tweets (symbolized by authors' avatars) are stacked vertically and organized by time horizontally. Tweets that have more attention via @mentions are closer to the middle.
    Continue Reading

  • Mapping GitHub – a network of collaborative coders

    March 31, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    GitHub is a large community where coders can collaborate on software development projects. People check code in and out, make edits, etc. Franck Cuny maps this community (with Gephi), based on information in thousands of user profiles.
    Continue Reading

  • News Topics as Social Network

    February 26, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    newsdots

    All news is connected in some way or another. News Dots from Slate shows just that.

    News Dots scans all articles from major publications—about 500 stories a day—and submits them to Calais, a service from Thompson Reuters that automatically "tags" content with all the important keywords: people, places, companies, topics, and so forth. Slate's tool registers any tag that appears at least twice in a story.

    Bubbles are sized by how much the corresponding topic is written about, and connections are made when topics are mentioned in the same article. Click on a topic to see the matching articles in the sidebar.

    How everything is placed I'm not exactly sure. I'm guessing distance represents some abstract measurement of relatedness. You guys have any better guesses?

  • Track Mouse Activity On Your Computer

    February 9, 2010  |  Network Visualization, Self-surveillance

    Anatoly Zenkov provides this nifty tool (Mac and PC) to track your mouse pointer. Really simple. Just start it, let it run, minimize the window, and carry on as usual. In the end, you get this image that looks something like a Pollock. Circles show areas where the pointer didn't move while the tracks show movement.
    Continue Reading

  • The Most Efficient Way to Type

    February 2, 2010  |  Network Visualization

    Are you using the most efficient typing technique or are your fingers jumping all over the keyboard? If it's the latter, I implore you - there is a better way. Your arms don't have to be tired after typing for ten minutes, and you just might finish that novel before the end of the decade. See these finger movement diagrams form Weather Sealed if you don't believe me.
    Continue Reading

  • Canvi & Temps: An Exploration of Science Over Time

    December 15, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    Bestiario, the group behind 6pli and a number of other network projects, released their most recent project - Canvi & Temps - that explores the complexity of science since the early 1920s.
    Continue Reading

  • Twitter Mentionmap and Correlations at your.flowingdata

    December 11, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    your.flowingdata got a couple of cool updates recently. One is based on your interactions with others on Twitter and the other helps you find relationships in your actions.

    Twitter Mentionmap

    The first is the Twitter Mentionmap created by Daniel McLaren. It's a network visualization (above) that lets you explore how you (or other Twitter users) interact with others.

    It's not focused on the data that many of you are used to seeing on YFD, but it's always been my plan to bring in other data sources. So when I saw Daniel post the original Mentionmap, I jumped at the chance to get a version for YFD. It seemed like a good first step to branching out. Get it? Network, branching out. Oh nevermind.

    By the way, Daniel used his constellation framework to build this. It's called asterisq. It's worth a look if you're looking to visualize network data. Daniel can also help you with customization and design.
    Continue Reading

  • A New Way to Search Images With Google Image Swirl

    November 30, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    There's this branch in computer science and statistics for vision research. Normally, if you ever hear about it in the news it's in the context of spotting terrorists in security tapes or facial recognition checkpoints (you know, like what they have in movies in front of giant steel doors). That is of course not the only application.

    Google (and many others) has been playing around with this stuff for a while. Most recently, they released Google Image Swirl in their labs section, which utilizes computer vision to find similar images.

    Above is my search for happy cat. The initial search result is what you're used to. It's a matrix of thumbnails. Click on one of them, and you'll get similar images clustered as a network graph.

    Google Image Swirl: the new way to find if someone is plagiarizing your work.

    [via information aesthetics]

  • The World of Seinfeld

    September 2, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    World of Seinfeld

    After yesterday's weirdness, I'm in the mood for something light.

    The show about nothing lasted nine seasons, during which Jerry, George, Kramer, and Elaine interacted with a whole lot of people. Ricky Linn, a graphic design student, mapped all the relationships over the years.

    Connecting lines are color-coded by type of relationship. It looks like Kramer was more about making friends while Jerry and George were more the dating type. I guess Elaine kept a tighter circle of friends.

  • Detailed View of the Kennedy Family Tree

    August 24, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    kennedy-family-tree

    As far back as I can remember there's always been a mystique around the Kennedy family. It's almost like if you bear the Kennedy name, you're destined for greatness. With the recent passing of Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Patterson Clark of The Washington Post maps out the famous family tree. The tree starts with the marriage of Joseph Patrick Kennedy and Rose Elizabeth Fitzgerald and branches out to current family members and what they do for a living.

    [via DataViz]

  • X-Men Universe Relationship Map

    July 1, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    xmen universe

    Contrary to what a lot people might think they know from the movies, the X-Men universe stretches out quite a ways with lots of characters and lots of relationships. This super detailed relationship map for all X-Men characters from UncannyXmen shows just that.

    Connections are color-coded to show the type of relationship between a pair of characters. For example, green is a one-sided infatuation, pink is a flirtation by both parties, and a dashed line signifies one of the characters is from an alternative reality. Wolverine sure gets around.

    [via VizWorld]

  • Visual Representation of Tabular Information – How to Fix the Uncommunicative Table

    April 21, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    This is a guest post by Martin Krzywinski who develops Circos, a GPL-licensed (free) visualization tool that can help you show relationships in data. This article is based on a longer writeup which you can find here.

    Suppose that you are reading an article and the text refers you to a table on the next page. Before you turn the page, what are your expectations of the table? Chances are, you would like it to communicate trends and patterns. Chances are, too, that it will fail and simply deliver numerical minutiae. You are left hunting around the numbers for a while, only to return to the text in hopes that the table's data trends will be communicated elsewhere.
    Continue Reading

  • Campaign Contributions to the 110th Congress

    April 10, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    This network graph shows common contributions between representatives in Congress:

    A relationship exists between two elements in the visual if they share a relationship with at least one member of the other group. For instance, both Bernie Sanders and Sam Brownback received campaign contributions from the the National Association of Realtors.

    Line thickness represents number of shared relationships; and color represents Democrat to Democrat, Republican to Republican, and cross-party connections. There's a zoomable version, but like a lot of network stuff it still feels cluttered. I'm sure some node interaction goodness would do this some good.

    [Thanks, @mrflip]

  • Phrase Net Shows the Secret Life of Words

    April 1, 2009  |  Network Visualization

    Many Eyes, the social data analysis site, released another visualization tool - Phrase Nets:

    When you read a book it can feel as if you’re encountering a series of hidden networks–characters who talk to each other, ideas that relate to each other. Our new visualization, the Phrase Net, is designed to bring some of these networks to light.

    Upload a body of text and choose connecting words like and or the and the Phrase Net provides a network of words that shows these connections.
    Continue Reading

Unless otherwise noted, graphics and words by me are licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC. Contact original authors for everything else.