• Can You Guess What These Maps Show?

    November 27, 2009  |  Mapping

    I'm no doubt still under massive food coma at this time, but in case you've regained consciousness or don't live in the US, check out this collection of maps from The Morning News. Can you guess what each is supposed to show? If you can guess even one of them correctly, I'll be impressed.

    [Thanks, William]

  • What’s Cooking on Thanksgiving, Mapped and Ranked

    November 26, 2009  |  Mapping

    Food-wise, Thanksgiving is different across the country. In some places you're going to get a lot of chitterlings and collard greens, while in others, turkey and mashed potatoes. Personally, I'm a big fan of the 10-course Chinese feast, but to each his own.

    The New York Times (Matthew Ericson and Amanda Cox), map what's cooking in your neck of the woods based on searches on Allrecipes. The top search, concentrated in the southeast, was sweet potato casserole. I have no idea what that is, but it must be delicious.
    Continue Reading

  • Battle of the Coverage Maps: Verizon vs. AT&T

    November 24, 2009  |  Mapping

    Verizon has been running these ads lately that compare their 3G coverage to that of AT&T's. In the ads a Verizon customer walks along on a speedy phone, and a US map pops up that's covered in red. Later, an AT&T customer looks frustrated with a sparsely-covered AT&T coverage map. You've probably seen them by now, but if not, here are the Verizon ones.
    Continue Reading

  • Make Thematic Maps With Cartographer.js

    November 5, 2009  |  Mapping, Software

    Like it or not, Google Maps mashups continue to be a Web favorite. It's just so easy to use. Stick a few lines of javascript in your web page, and voila, you've got an interactive map. That's for point-wise data though. It gets a little trickier beyond "you are here" pointers. Cartographic.js, in its first release, aims to make thematic mapping with the Google Maps API easier.
    Continue Reading

  • Unemployment, 2004 to Present – The Country is Bleeding

    November 4, 2009  |  Data Sources, Mapping

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the most recent unemployment numbers last week. Things aren't looking good for the unemployed, I'm afraid.

    I showed my younger sister the maps. Her response: "It looks like the country is bleeding."
    Continue Reading

  • Using Flickr as a Paintbrush

    October 28, 2009  |  Mapping

    Andy Woodruff from Cartogrammar uses average color in Flickr photos to map the colors that people take the most pictures of. The above for example, shows the common colors of Harvard Square. Why all the red? It's because there's so many brick buildings.

    So in the end is a map that provides a different geographic view of what we're used to seeing. We're used to seeing the aerials or the designer-defined color coding of roads and land. This however, while portrayed as a view from above, is what people are seeing on the ground.

  • This Would Be Perfect for a Roomba Commercial

    October 27, 2009  |  Mapping

    roomba

    You know the Roomba from iRobot? It's the robot vacuum cleaner that is supposed to do the work on its own so that you don't have to. I've seen video of the thing picking up dirt and junk but I've always been skeptical that it would cover all areas.

    Well the above, from Signal Theorist, is the Roomba coverage over a half an hour. A camera was setup, the lights were turned off, and the above is a long exposure shot of the Roomba's path. Not bad huh?

    [via Simple Complexity]

  • You Are Not Allowed to Read this Book

    October 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    MappingBookCensorship2

    What would a freshman English class be without Of MIce and Men? No George or Lenny? People in Appomattox, Virginia seem to think it'd be just fine.

    The National Coalition Against Censorship, however, has different ideas on the matter. For the past couple of years the NCAC has confronted such bans and challenges from libraries and curricula. Above is a map of bans and challenges over from December 2006 to May 2009. Other notable works include The Golden Compass, Girl, Interrupted, and yes, brace yourself, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

    [via DataViz]

  • The Geography of Job Loss

    October 9, 2009  |  Mapping

    While on the topic of job loss and unemployment, here's an animated map from Tip Strategies that shows job gains and losses over time.

    Red means loss and green means gain, and as you can see above, there isn't much green (read that zero) on the map. The larger the circle is, the greater the number of net loss or gain compared to that of the numbers of the year before in the respective metropolitan statistical area.
    Continue Reading

  • Trendsmap Shows Twitter Trends Geographically

    October 7, 2009  |  Mapping

    Twitter shows trending topics, but it's for the entire user base. You can only see what everyone on Twitter is talking about at any given time. Trendsmap, on the other hand, shows trending topics by location. See what's trending in any part of the world in real-time.
    Continue Reading

  • Earth Through the Eyes of Astronauts

    September 14, 2009  |  Mapping

    Bella Gaia, or Beautiful Earth, is a unique view of earth through the eye's of astronauts in an effort to provide some sentiment to our home planet.
    Continue Reading

  • Stimulus Funding Map is ‘Slick as Hell’

    September 9, 2009  |  Mapping

    stimulus

    As you know, states have received billions of dollars of federal stimulus funding. But do you know where all the money goes?

    Stamen Design, in its most recent project with the State of California, lets you explore the money breakdown. Like most of Stamen's work, at the base is an interactive map, but it is of course much more than that.

    Roll over for breakdowns, search for your city or county, select sectors of interest, and take a look at project-specific information. The color-coded bars change depend on what's geographically in view, and the map zooms in on points of interest on the fly.

    In Eric's words, "It's just slick as hell."

  • Mapping the Growth of the Internet – What Do You Think?

    August 20, 2009  |  Mapping

    exploding-internet

    I, uh, well. Hmm. Yeah. New Scientist recently compiled a list of visualizations exploring the growth of the Internet. Here they are in no particular order (plus the one above).
    Continue Reading

  • What DC Metro Routes are Most Common?

    August 18, 2009  |  Mapping

    metro-riderrship

    Greater Greater Washington maps rider flow for the DC Metro. As you might guess, the thicker the path, the greater the estimated number of riders in that given area.

    As the author notes, the data collection process was an unscientific one, so it should be taken with a few grains of salt, but this makes me wonder. These types of subway maps seem to be getting fairly common, in both the static and interactive/animated variety - but the visualization always seems to come from estimates.

    Have any metro systems released their full data? I am sure there are tons of data logs sitting somewhere, growing every time someone swipes their metro card or drops in a subway coin. And more importantly, are metro systems using these types of visualizations to figure out how to distribute trains at different times per day? Do they use something better?

    [Thanks, Jamie]

  • Religious Geography of the United States

    August 17, 2009  |  Mapping

    christian

    The U.S. Census Bureau doesn't ask questions about religion because of political issues involving separation of church and state, so we don't always get a very detailed view of religion. The Glenmary Research Center does collect this data, however.

    The Valparaiso geography department maps this detailed data, and the extensive collection of choropleth maps can be found here.
    Continue Reading

  • Mapping Crime in Oxford Over Time

    August 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    crimemap

    Mentorn Media and Cimex Media, on behalf of BBC, explore crime patterns in Oxford over time. In a map, that I am happy to see is not a Google mashup, select different kinds of crime (e.g. violent crime, burglary & theft), or if you live in the area, compare different neighborhoods by postcode. The interactive also provides three animations for a week in crime - street violence, street robbery, and rowdy behavior - complemented by narration and explanation.

    One thing I'm not so sure about is the color scale. I think I would have gone with a yellow to red progression and left out the green since green usually means something positive. I'm also not sure what 'high' and 'low' levels of crime actually means in numbers. What do you think?

    [Thanks, Jack]

  • Watch the Ebb and Flow of Melbourne Trains

    August 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Similar to other visualizations showing location (e.g. Cabspotting, Britain From Above), this one from Australia-based data visualization group, Flink Labs, shows the ebb and flow of Melbourne trains over the course of a single weekday using the Melbourne train schedule as the data.
    Continue Reading

  • Health Care Costs Vary Widely By Region

    July 9, 2009  |  Mapping

    health-care

    No, this isn't a bad fungus spreading northwest towards Washington. This map from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (via MSNBC) shows health care costs across the country, and yes, you are included Hawaii and Alaska.

    As you can see health care costs are from uniform country-wide.

    However, the color scale is kind of funky. I'm guessing it was automatically chosen by the mapping software to even split the number of regions amongst the five color bins, which I think kind of throws off the color distribution. I don't know. I think as a whole, the map is missing some special sauce.

    [Thanks, Christopher]

  • Realtime Information Graphics Show International Data Interchange

    July 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Zum Kuckuck, a design group in Germany, visualizes data interchange and network traffic with Processing in this beautifully executed installation.
    Continue Reading

  • Abortion Rates in the United States, 1970-2005

    June 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    I've been working on my mapping skills lately in preparation for the first FlowingPrints poster, so when I came across this dataset for abortion rates in America, I had to map it.

    The darker the shade of green, the higher the number of reported abortions per 1,000 live births.

    New York has the highest rate with a whopping 507, which is a little over a third. That I'm not so sure about though. I'm thinking that there might be some high numbers in the '70s driving that rate up, but I'd have to look deeper into that. Wyoming, on the other hand, only had a reported 14 abortions between 1970 and 2005.

    In retrospect, the choice of green probably wasn't the best color choice, but seeing as this is just practice, I don't think it's a big deal.

    How I Made It

    In case you're wondering, I made the basemap in R using the maps and maptools packages. It was actually only 5 or 6 lines of code after I got the data how I wanted it. Then as I always do, I brought the PDF into Adobe Illustrator for some touch-ups and annotation.

    Check out the full version here.

    UPDATE: I revised the map using the Albers projection, so it doesn't look so funky. Of course, it was more difficult than originally thought. Tutorial to come.

Copyright © 2007-2014 FlowingData. All rights reserved. Hosted by Linode.