• Mapping Crime in Oxford Over Time

    August 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    crimemap

    Mentorn Media and Cimex Media, on behalf of BBC, explore crime patterns in Oxford over time. In a map, that I am happy to see is not a Google mashup, select different kinds of crime (e.g. violent crime, burglary & theft), or if you live in the area, compare different neighborhoods by postcode. The interactive also provides three animations for a week in crime - street violence, street robbery, and rowdy behavior - complemented by narration and explanation.

    One thing I'm not so sure about is the color scale. I think I would have gone with a yellow to red progression and left out the green since green usually means something positive. I'm also not sure what 'high' and 'low' levels of crime actually means in numbers. What do you think?

    [Thanks, Jack]

  • Watch the Ebb and Flow of Melbourne Trains

    August 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Similar to other visualizations showing location (e.g. Cabspotting, Britain From Above), this one from Australia-based data visualization group, Flink Labs, shows the ebb and flow of Melbourne trains over the course of a single weekday using the Melbourne train schedule as the data.
    Continue Reading

  • Health Care Costs Vary Widely By Region

    July 9, 2009  |  Mapping

    health-care

    No, this isn't a bad fungus spreading northwest towards Washington. This map from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (via MSNBC) shows health care costs across the country, and yes, you are included Hawaii and Alaska.

    As you can see health care costs are from uniform country-wide.

    However, the color scale is kind of funky. I'm guessing it was automatically chosen by the mapping software to even split the number of regions amongst the five color bins, which I think kind of throws off the color distribution. I don't know. I think as a whole, the map is missing some special sauce.

    [Thanks, Christopher]

  • Realtime Information Graphics Show International Data Interchange

    July 3, 2009  |  Mapping

    Zum Kuckuck, a design group in Germany, visualizes data interchange and network traffic with Processing in this beautifully executed installation.
    Continue Reading

  • Abortion Rates in the United States, 1970-2005

    June 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    I've been working on my mapping skills lately in preparation for the first FlowingPrints poster, so when I came across this dataset for abortion rates in America, I had to map it.

    The darker the shade of green, the higher the number of reported abortions per 1,000 live births.

    New York has the highest rate with a whopping 507, which is a little over a third. That I'm not so sure about though. I'm thinking that there might be some high numbers in the '70s driving that rate up, but I'd have to look deeper into that. Wyoming, on the other hand, only had a reported 14 abortions between 1970 and 2005.

    In retrospect, the choice of green probably wasn't the best color choice, but seeing as this is just practice, I don't think it's a big deal.

    How I Made It

    In case you're wondering, I made the basemap in R using the maps and maptools packages. It was actually only 5 or 6 lines of code after I got the data how I wanted it. Then as I always do, I brought the PDF into Adobe Illustrator for some touch-ups and annotation.

    Check out the full version here.

    UPDATE: I revised the map using the Albers projection, so it doesn't look so funky. Of course, it was more difficult than originally thought. Tutorial to come.

  • World Map of Social Network Dominance

    June 8, 2009  |  Mapping

    Vincenzo Cosenza maps social network dominance around the world according to traffic data from Alexa and Google Trends. We see Facebook has apparently overtaken MySpace in the US along with other countries; Orkut is a favorite in Brazil; the people love QQ in China; and then there are a few smaller networks that most of us have probably never heard of unless we live in the country of dominance.

    It's also worth noting that the map was done with IBM's Many Eyes, so you can interact with the embedded map below. After data culling, the map was probably created in no time.

    I personally don't know anyone who uses anything other than Facebook or LinkedIn. Remember Friendster? People always laugh when I mention it. What do you use?

  • Worldwide Obama Buzz Visualized

    May 26, 2009  |  Mapping

    In celebration of Barack Obama's 100th day as the 44th President of the United States, the MIT SENSEable City Lab visualized mobile phone activity during the historic inauguration. What we see is a sense of the worldwide celebration and when and where people traveled to Washington, D.C. to get to the event. They call it Obama | One People. Continue Reading

  • Indieprojector Makes it Easy to Map Your Geographical Data

    May 21, 2009  |  Mapping, Online Applications

    Axis Maps recently released indieprojector, a new component to indiemapper, their in-development mapping project to "bring traditional cartography into the 21st century." Indieprojector lets you import KML and shapefiles and easily reproject your data into a selection of popular map projections. No longer do you have to live within the bounds of a map that makes Greenland look the same size as Africa. Continue Reading

  • Death Penalty Laws Around the World

    May 15, 2009  |  Mapping

    With their usual flare, GOOD Magazine maps the death penalty around the world according to Amnesty International. Here we see that the philosophy varies quite a bit from country to country; however, most countries have either abolished the death penalty or only use it in exceptional cases. The death penalty is still in use in about 30 percent of countries. Like the map of drinking age though, I suspect laws vary within the countries. Continue Reading

  • Maps of the Seven Deadly Sins

    May 12, 2009  |  Mapping

    Geographers from Kansas State University map the spatial distribution of the seven deadly sins in the United States. These types of maps are always kind of iffy as they draw from data from various sources gathered with different methods and usually use some kind of researcher-defined metric. Still interesting though... right?
    Continue Reading

  • Here & There: Horizonless Perspective of Manhattan

    May 5, 2009  |  Mapping

    Jack Schulze provides this horizonless view of Manhattan:

    Here & There is a project by S&W exploring speculative projections of dense cities. These maps of Manhattan look uptown from 3rd and 7th, and downtown from 3rd and 35th. They're intended to be seen at those same places, putting the viewer simultaneously above the city and in it where she stands, both looking down and looking forward.

    Imagine a person standing at a street corner. The projection begins with a three-dimensional representation of the immediate environment. Close buildings are represented normally, and the viewer himself is shown in the third person, exactly where she stands.

    It takes a minute to wrap your head around the concept, but it's an interesting one. It bet it'd be especially awesome if it were an interactive map that you could use while you roamed around a dense city. What do you think, cartographers?

    [via kottke & waxy | Thanks, Jodi]

  • Is Your Country Involved in Open Source?

    April 30, 2009  |  Mapping

    Red Hat, an open source leader best known for their Linux distribution, maps open source activity around the world. If you're not a developer or involved with Web-ish things, open source might seem like a foreign concept. Give away your code, your work, and your data. And succeed? I don't know how it works, but somehow, it does. Open source not only helps an application flourish, but also helps ideas develop further than they ever would with a single group. Plus - it makes my life, and many others' lives much easier.

  • Visualizing the United States Power Grid

    April 28, 2009  |  Mapping

    NPR provides an in depth view of the U.S. electric grid, exploring the network, power sources, and where in the country power is coming from:

    The U.S. electric grid is a complex network of independently owned and operated power plants and transmission lines. Aging infrastructure, combined with a rise in domestic electricity consumption, has forced experts to critically examine the status and health of the nation's electrical systems.

    The above is a view of the grid; below is a view of nuclear and solar energy across the country.
    Continue Reading

  • Jobs Vanish Across Our Country

    April 20, 2009  |  Mapping

    As a nation, we gained jobs every month during 2007 compared to the same month one year before. However, since July of 2008, we've seen a loss in jobs nationwide, and up until Februrary of this year, it's gotten worse every month. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the recession has claimed more than 5 million jobs. This interactive map from Slate Magazine says it all.

    [Thanks, @jaybol and @barr]

  • Geography of Buzz In Los Angeles and New York

    April 13, 2009  |  Mapping

    Elizabeth Currid (USC) and Sarah Williams (Columbia University), collaborate to map the geography of buzz in Los Angeles (above) and New York (below). The two researchers mined thousands of photos from Getty Images which provided a dataset of parties in art, music, fashion, movies, film, etc and created density maps which in turn show the hip places to be.
    Continue Reading

  • Zappos Maps Sales in Real-time

    April 9, 2009  |  Mapping

    Zappos, the online shoe retailer, maps sales across the United States in real-time. We've seen this before in Twittervision and other Google Maps mashups, but the difference here is that every shoe that pops on the map is cash in the bank. Keep that in mind, and this mashup takes on whole new meaning. Disregard the bug that doesn't reposition markers on zoom.

    [Thanks, @noahharlan]

  • 24 Hours of Geotagged Photos on Flickr

    April 6, 2009  |  Mapping

    Daniel Catt from Flickr maps 24 hours worth of geotagged photos (about 64,000 of them) on this animated 3-D globe (below). The project was implemented in Processing, which shouldn't come as much of a surprise to anyone, and we've seen this type of 3-D globe thing before. What's cool here is that all the data came from the Flickr API:

    All the data was pulled down (using Processing, of all things) via the API, and probably took around 12 minutes (when it's behaving itself) as I was being a) gentle with the servers b) was getting it as JSON which takes a while for Processing to parse each page. And then written to a flat file.

    I didn't realize that public Flickr data was so accessible. Although, there wasn't really any reason for me to think otherwise. Maybe it's time to consider a little Flickr side project with some Modest Maps.

    [via Waxy]

  • Make This Sitcom Map More Informative

    April 2, 2009  |  Mapping

    This map from Dan Meth displays popular sitcoms by where they took place. It's a comic and totally amusing, so there's no need to pick it apart, but let's imagine for a second that it's an infographic. What could we do to make this graphic more informative? How do we turn this comic into a more useful map? Discuss amongst yourselves.

    [Thanks, Eric]

  • Legal Drinking Age Around the World

    March 27, 2009  |  Mapping

    While we're on the topic of beer (it is Friday after all), let's take a look at legal drinking age around the world. Greenland - no age limit. Probably gotta drink to stay warm, eh? Have a nice weekend, everyone. Be kind to your liver.

    [Thanks, Jason]

  • Where Can You Find America’s Best Beer?

    March 27, 2009  |  Mapping

    beer-medal-map

    Mike Wirth maps medal winners from the Great American Beer Festival from 1987 to 2007. I'm not surprised that California has won so many medals, because, well it's a big state, but check out Colorado and Wisconsin. There must be some good beer there. Although, it's hard to make any real judgment based just on medals. Coors and Budweiser have each won seven medals. Really? To each his own, I guess.

    [Thanks, Mike]

Unless otherwise noted, graphics and words by me are licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC. Contact original authors for everything else.