• Compare What Your Senators and Reps are Talking About With Congress Speaks

    July 31, 2009  |  Infographics

    congress-speaks

    There's a lot of talking in congressional meetings, but what are your state senators and representatives talking about? Design group Periscopic explores what congress men and women said from 2007 to 2008 in this tongue-in-cheek comparison tool with talking heads. The best part about the tool is that behind the humor is actually something useful.

    Compare word distributions of senators, of states, of a senator to a state, or representatives, so on and so forth. We get breakdowns by gender, number of words spoken, and by state. All data come from public records.

    [via @krees]

  • Animated Infographics for the Eat Local, Eat Real Campaign

    July 29, 2009  |  Infographics

    I love food. I love infographics. Put them together, and this is what you get. As part of the Eat Local, Eat Real campaign, this infographic video (below), produced by Sons and Daughters and Crush of Toronto, argues why we should eat local.
    Continue Reading

  • Suicides by Location on the Golden Gate Bridge

    July 28, 2009  |  Infographics

    mn_suicide30_loc_tt

    This graphic from SF Gate is a good four years old, well before I knew what an infographic was, but just because it's old doesn't mean it's not interesting. Here we see San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and the "sad tally" of 1,218 known suicides by location. Each black square represents a person who has taken his or her life and 128 light poles are used as reference points.

    The east side of the bridge, where most of the suicides occurred, has a pedestrian walkway. The first suicide was just 10 weeks after the bridge opened in 1937.

    [Thanks, Justin]

  • Gauge Your Distraction While You Text and Drive in the Distracted Driving Game

    July 27, 2009  |  Infographics

    Picture 1

    From Gabriel Dance, Tom Jackson, and Aaron Pilhofer of the New York Times is this game to gauge your distraction while you're texting on the road. Yes. It's fun AND educational. Here's how it works.

    You're in a car with a driver's point of view. You're driving on a freeway or road with a ridiculous number of gates. There are six of them, and as you approach the gates, one will open, and you have select that open gate by pressing the right number. After a few seconds of practice, you'll receive a text message on the screen that asks a question. You have to reply while still selecting the correct gates as they pass.
    Continue Reading

  • Death and Taxes Poster 2010 – 50% Off for FlowingData Readers

    July 23, 2009  |  Infographics

    Jess Bachman of WallStats just released his annual Death and Taxes Poster for 2010. For those unfamiliar, the poster is a graphical breakdown of the United States federal budget.
    Continue Reading

  • Comparing the Human and Chimpanzee Genomes

    July 21, 2009  |  Infographics

    genome

    As part of the Explore Evolution exhibit at the University of Nebraska State Museum, Judy Diamond displays a segment of the human genome in line with that of the chimpanzee that matches very closely. The point is to show how similar two are with the few differences represented by a drawing of a man, distinguished geneticist Svante Paabo.
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  • Why Are Cheap Airlines So Cheap?

    July 16, 2009  |  Infographics

    airlines

    5W Graphics, whose work you've seen by now, compares lower-cost airlines to "regular" airlines. The infographic is from the Spain group, so the focus is on Eurpoean airlines. Apparently the concept of low fair airlines (LFAs) is fairly new in Europe, only starting in 1990 with Ryanair while Southwest Airlines was founded in 1970. I'm more of a JetBlue guy myself. I cherish my legroom and in-flight entertainment.

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • How Does the Average Consumer Spend His Money?

    July 14, 2009  |  Infographics

    wheredidthemoneygo

    Add another graphic to the list of ways to show consumer spending. Visual Economics displays data from the most recent spending survey (April 2009) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Compare this to last year's survey results via an NYT interactive.

    The biggest difference I'm seeing is that between last year's spending on housing (42%) and this year (34%). Maybe that's why my mother-in-law keeps telling me it's a good time to buy a house. Do you notice anything interesting?

  • Religious Teachings On Sex

    July 10, 2009  |  Infographics

    religion-sex

    This graphic on religious teachings and sex is making the social media rounds. The source is questionable and the design is a little iffy, but oh what the heck, it's Friday. Have a nice weekend all.

    [Thanks, Brian]

  • Is the Economy Getting Ready to Turn Around?

    July 6, 2009  |  Economics, Infographics

    Is the economy going to turn around any time soon? How does this economic swing compare to previous cycles? Amanda Cox et al of the New York Times explores these ever so important questions in her recent nine-part interactive series.
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  • Infographic Provides a Twitter History Lesson

    June 30, 2009  |  Infographics

    Manolith, in collaboration with InfoShots, tells the story of Twitter. The graphic starts at Twitter's humble beginnings and ends at present day where you pretty much can't go a day without hearing about that little bird. I wonder what this Twitter tree will look like next year.

    [via Techcrunch]

  • Does this Calorie Intake Infographic Work? Not Really

    June 24, 2009  |  Infographics

    How long does it take to burn off the calories from a Big Mac and medium fries or a chocolate chip cookie? Petra Axlund of 5W Infographics shows with this infographic how long you have to exercise, after eating a certain item, to burn it all off.

    The red outside track shows the number of calories from the food item, while the inside tracks represent how long it takes for a male or female to burn off those calories with different exercises.

    Percentage Problem

    While creative, and as they say, visually appealing, it doesn't quite work technically speaking. The primary purpose of this graphic is to compare how long it takes to burn off the calories of a food item with different exercises. However, arc lengths are formed by percentage of an undefined whole, as opposed to count (in this case, calories on the outside and minutes out the outside).

    Okay, that last paragraph probably made no sense. Let's look at an example. This issue is most evident in pizza section. According to the graphic, it takes the average male 352 minutes to burn off a pepperoni pizza while it takes just 234 minutes to run it off. Therefore, the running arc for male should be about 2/3 the size of the walking arc if it were a bar chart.

    Instead we're comparing percentages, and the running arc sorta looks like it's about 3/4 the size of the walking arc. It'd probably look different if you were to roll out the arcs into bars, but that's too much brain power for me. I'm lazy like that.

    How it Could've Worked

    I think there's another way to make this graphic work other than making a bunch of bar charts. Instead of graphing minutes to burn off x amount of calories, show number of calories burned after x hours of exercise. It'd still be a little weird and less colorful, but it'd be more informative and easier to compare. It's mostly eye candy and a one-way reference as it is now.

    Gosh, I hate to be so critical, but it just doesn't work for me. What do you think?

    [via metrobest]

  • Business Valuation Calculator Like Trendalyzer With Style

    June 18, 2009  |  Economics, Infographics

    Inc.com just released their annual valuation guide for 2009, which allows business owners to gauge the value of their, uh, business. At the center of this guide is an interactive "business valuation calculator" by Tommy McCall. I guess the best way to describe the graphic is Trendalyzer with some style and added functionality.

    Each dot represents an industry and the position on the chart indicates whether the companies in that industry are priced high or low. Press the play button and watch how prices change between 2002 and now.

    Finally, if you've got a business of your own, enter your own values to for a custom value estimate.

    [Thanks, Sarah]

  • GOOD Magazine’s Infographics Now Archived on Flickr

    June 3, 2009  |  Infographics

    You know all those infographics that you like so much from GOOD Magazine? Well they're all in one place now in their Flickr archive. Head on over to view all 80.

    [Thanks, Amrit]

  • Possible Futures of Twitter Visualized

    June 2, 2009  |  Infographics

    We all know Twitter has taken on a life of its own. With the very open API, Twitter allows developers to create countless applications on top of the service, and the sheer number of users has opened up opportunities in the area of real-time search. Needless to say, Twitter has a lot of opportunities worth considering, and it's possible the service could look very different a year from now (underneath the frontend) as more people adopt and bubbling acquisition rumors perhaps come to fruition. The below flow chart from Steve Rubel shows Twitter's possible future while the above from Brian Solis and Jess3 shows all the spawns of Twitter data.
    Continue Reading

  • Déjà Poo: Turning Wastewater to Nonpotable Water

    June 2, 2009  |  Infographics

    This infographic from Wired explains how Living Machines work to combine waste management and a garden in an office lobby. Honestly, I'm posting this for one reason only. The title is Déjà Poo. Brilliant. Yes. I am that immature.

    This infographic from Wired explains how Living Machines work to combine waste management and a garden in an office lobby. Honestly, I'm posting this for one reason only. The title is Déjà Poo. Brilliant. Yes. I am that immature.

    [via Graphic Sociology]

  • 11 Informative (and Fun) Infographics About Beer

    May 29, 2009  |  Infographics

    It's Friday. It's summer. It's time to relax in the backyard with an ice cold beer in hand. As you consume your beverage, here are 11 infographics about your beer, because the more you know, the more you enjoy. To start things off is a full history of beer (above). Continue Reading

  • Bubbles Galore in Analysis of Banks’ Financial Health

    May 13, 2009  |  Infographics

    Andrew Garcia Phillips and Stephen Grocer of The Wall Street Journal compare the financial health of 19 major banks according to recent government stress tests. Each row represents a metric, each bubble represents a bank, and the size of a bubble represents the value of a metric for that bank. Roll over bubbles for more information or select a specific bank in the left sidebar. I know a lot of you don't like bubbles in your viz, but this one works for me.

    [Thanks, Vikram]

  • Spectrum of Online Friendship

    May 1, 2009  |  Infographics

    This graphic, from Mike Arauz, describes different levels of online friendship, starting at passive interest (read your blog but not much else) up to investment (deeply care about your success). I originally thought it was just one of those comic infographics, but there's some good discussion going on in the comments of the original post and the Arauz' response.

    [Thanks, @JeffHurt]

  • What Drugs Pose the Greatest Danger?

    May 1, 2009  |  Infographics

    While The New York Times continues to produce excellent work, GOOD Magazine has been churning out interesting graphics on the other side of the spectrum. In their most recent transparency graphic, GOOD describes the drugs that pose the greatest danger according to local law officials, when asked by the Department of Justice. Underneath the creative bling is essentially a stacked bar chart. The purists are going to cry bloody murder, but hey, it still gets the point across, right?

    Have a nice weekend, everyone. See you Monday.

    [Thanks, @joaovc]

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