• Facebook privacy options untangled

    May 17, 2010  |  Infographics

    People are up in arms about Facebook's new privacy policies, partly because some information was forced into public view and partly because there are so many settings that figuring out what's public and what's private is confusing. Guilbert Gates of the New York Times clears things up with the above graphic. To put it simply: there's a lot of stuff.
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  • Field guide to fanboys

    May 13, 2010  |  Infographics

    Fanboy field guide

    PCWorld provides a handy field guide to help you spot fanboys in the wild. Come in contact with someone who is strangely turned on by brushed metal, goes rampant on the mention of AT&T, calls everything magical, fears beach volleyballs, and has Coldplay on constant repeat? You've got an Apple fanboy on your hands. You've been warned.

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • The path to successful infographics

    May 11, 2010  |  Design, Infographics

    Most people don't know what actually goes into a good infographic. There's a lot more to it than just the design. There's research, analysis, and fact-checking that you have to do long before you open Illustrator. Sarah Slobin, from the Wall Street Journal, explains how to create successful infographics. Have an idea, get the data, choose your tools, edit wisely, and above all else, pay close attention to detail.

  • Nutritional facts redesigned

    May 10, 2010  |  Infographics

    Nutrition facts labels are uniform across products, but let's imagine for a second that you could do whatever you want, just as long they showed certain bits of information. FFunction takes a stab at redesigning the standard milk carton under this premise. No cows, no fields of green, and no dairies. Just nutritional facts and full transparency on what's going into your body.

    This wouldn't work with a mass market, but hey, they've got my purchase. After all, data does a body good.

    [Thanks, Audree]

  • Evolution of Facebook privacy policies

    May 7, 2010  |  Infographics

    There's been a lot of hullabaloo about Facebook's newly installed privacy policies. It started out very closed, to just university students, and has expanded its reach, especially over the past year, to the more public Web. Matt McKeon, of the Visual Communication Lab, explores Facebook's privacy policies, from 2005 to present.

    Rings represent the audience, starting with you in the middle all the way out to the entire Internet. Slices represent bits and interactions you have on Facebook. Click on the image to see how the policies changed over the years for each bit.

    Finally, you can also download the code (in the implementation section), which was written in Processing.js. I think I'm noticing a trend. Check it out here.

    [via Ben Fry]

  • Tracking the oil spill

    May 7, 2010  |  Infographics, Mapping

    For those following the status of the oil spill, the New York Times provides a map tracking the spread. Press play to get the day-by-day. The oil is currently spreading to the west of the Mississippi delta, getting dangerously close to the oyster beds (in red).
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  • The Boom of Big Infographics

    May 6, 2010  |  Infographics

    Big information graphics have been around for a long time. They've come in the form of maps, visualization, art, signs, etc. That was all on paper though. In the past couple of years, humongous, gigantic, and often really long infographics have found their way onto the computer screen, through blogs and news sites. Some are great. Some really suck. The volume is booming for both.

    Let's take a look at when this all got started, where the trend is headed, and how much we should really read into these things.
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  • How men and women label colors

    May 4, 2010  |  Infographics, Statistics

    Along the same lines of Dolores Labs' color experiment, Randall Munroe of xkcd reveals the results of his color survey. He took a slightly different approach though. Here are some of the basic findings:

    If you ask people to name colors long enough, they go totally crazy.

    “Puke” and “vomit” are totally real colors.

    Colorblind people are more likely than non-colorblind people to type “fuck this” (or some variant) and quit in frustration.

    Indigo was totally just added to the rainbow so it would have 7 colors and make that “ROY G. BIV” acronym work, just like you always suspected. It should really be ROY GBP, with maybe a C or T thrown in there between G and B depending on how the spectrum was converted to RGB.

    A couple dozen people embedded SQL ‘drop table’ statements in the color names. Nice try, kids.

    Nobody can spell “fuchsia”.

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  • Trustworthiness of beards

    April 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    Matt McInerney of pixelspread describes the trustworthiness of the people behind their facial hair. You better be careful when I'm around. I'm questionable, border-line unsavory. Don't worry though. I'm not a werewolf - and I don't have the ability to grow a Hitler. How trustworthy are you?
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  • Local neighborhood infographics

    April 21, 2010  |  Infographics

    Good Mag put on an infographic contest not too long ago that asked people to design around the idea of neighborhood. Any neighborhood would do, just as long the focus was on local. As you might expect, most of the entries were more design than data, but hey, that doesn't mean they're not worth looking at.
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  • A flowchart to decide what typeface to use

    April 21, 2010  |  Infographics

    A typeface can make or break your graphic. Use Comic Sans, and no one will take you seriously ever again. Luckily, graphic designer Julian Hansen put together this flowchart for a school project to help you figure out what typeface to use. Most of you will probably be interested in the infographic branch.
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  • Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline

    April 19, 2010  |  Infographics

    I don't often give in to impulse buys, but I just ordered Cartographies of Time, and I'm pretty sure it's going to be well worth the thirty bucks.
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  • The making of wine – in motion graphics

    April 9, 2010  |  Infographics

    Designer Tiago Cabaco explains the conception of wine in this short animated infographic. Some of the effects, like the frame rotation, are a little overused. It actually made me a little dizzy, but it's short. Still fun to watch.
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  • 100 Pixar characters drawn to scale

    April 8, 2010  |  Infographics

    Designer Juan Pablo Bravo illustrates 100 Pixar characters to scale, from Wally B. and Luxo Jr. to Wall E. and Lotso, from the upcoming Toy Story 3. Main characters are highlighted in yellow. Catch the full giganto version of the graphic on Flickr.
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  • Edward Tufte on his White House appointment

    April 3, 2010  |  Infographics

    Edward Tufte was officially appointed to a White House advisory role a few weeks ago. Tufte, along with other experts like Ben Shneiderman, have been providing input for the last year or so.

    Tufte has a short chat (embedded below) with On the Media about what's been going on with Recovery.gov. The main point: report data like The New York Times.

    The first thing I said about a year ago when I met with them for the first time is that their model should be a first-rate news website... Once we got the news metaphor and got the intense mapping, that’s halfway there. I wouldn't give it an A yet. There’s, you know, still a ways to go, and I know some of them, and I hope to, you know, find a few more.

    Once Recovery.gov is further along, hopefully other government organizations follow suit, starting with Data.gov...or maybe Census...or the Bureau of Labor Statistics...or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Listen to the six-minute interview below.
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  • Japan, the strange country, in motion graphics

    March 30, 2010  |  Infographics

    Design student Kenichi Tanaka animates the history of Japan for his final thesis project.

    He pokes fun at his culture a little bit there in the beginning, yeah? I feel like something is getting lost in translation.

    Update: The English version was taken down, unfortunately. Here's the original Japanese version. The graphics are still in English, so you can probably understand most of it without the narration.

    [Thanks, @pims]

  • What your email says about your finances

    March 25, 2010  |  Infographics

    This graphic shows average debt categorized by email provider. Average age for Gmail users is 33 and 47 for Comcast. Yeah, that sounds about right.
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  • The Growing Plague that is Spam

    March 24, 2010  |  Infographics

    Spam sucks. We all hate it, but no matter how good the filter, something always seems to get through. Want some cheap Vi4gr4? I can tell you where to get it. New Scientist takes a look at the spamdemic. It costs very little to send tens of thousands of emails, but it only takes a tiny percentage of idiots to make it all worth it for spammers.

    Seriously - who falls for these things?

    • oRo1exWatches $200 Off - Each Free Shipping Watch, 2 Days Left, Snap UP! rkru kp
    • USA: ~Percocent~Ritalin best sale !!
    • ~~~Good day :~~~Vicodi~ _ P~ercocet~~~
    • 100 percent male power
    • Heartfelt Plea from Supreme Master Ching Hai: Be Organic Vegan and Loving Kindness for Saving Lives

    I have to admit my spam folder does supply brief moments of amusement every now and then, but come on.

    [via Data Mining]

  • March Madness by the numbers

    March 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    March Madness final620

    I didn't fill out my bracket this year, so it's not nearly as exciting for me. I don't think that's stopped thousands of bars across the country from cleaning house though.

    [FastCompany via Good]

  • Notes from Interactive Infographics #interinfo #sxsw

    March 17, 2010  |  Infographics, News

    Yesterday was the Interactive Infographics panel at South by Southwest, and if Twitter is any indication of how it went, I'd say the panel had a captivated audience. I wouldn't expect anything less from the four panelists, Ben Fry (Processing), Shan Carter (NYT), Casey Caplowe (Good), and Eric Rodenbeck (Stamen)

    Unfortunately, I didn't get to attend, but luckily I was able to follow the play-by-play on Livefyre (sort of a cross between chat and forum) along with some excellent notes from @jpmarcum and @bryanconnor. Here are the important bits I was able to glean.

    The bulk of the time was spent showcasing the work from the four groups. I think you can find most of the projects through FlowingData. Just use the search form on the bottom right of this page. The good stuff came towards the end during the Q&A.
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