• Context to underwater depths

    June 10, 2010  |  Infographics

    The Deepwater Horizon well is nearly a mile deep in water. It extends 3.5 miles. It's hard to imagine these depths of the ocean though since most of us have never gone further than twenty feet below. The New York Times' Bill Marsh provides some context. The Titanic rests 2.4 miles down, while in 1960, a U.S. Navy submersible descended to the deepest known ocean floor, about 7 miles into the darkness. [Thanks, Peter]

  • Track the 2010 MTV Movie Awards

    June 6, 2010  |  Infographics

    mtv-bars

    Excited about the 2010 MTV Movie Awards? Yeah, me neither. But if you want to keep an eye on things while you watch or do something else (you know, in case there's a Kanye moment), MTV and Stamen provide a tweet tracker for the event. Similar to the VMA tracker last year, movies and celebrities are highlighted based on tweets about them per minute. The look, feel, and views are different, however.
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  • How little musicians earn online

    June 4, 2010  |  Infographics

    You've heard about the struggling musician. It's a tough business. How tough is it though? David McCandless of Information is Beautiful, looks at how much musicians make from major online outlets. Bubbles are sized by how many sales or plays a song must get before someone makes US monthly minimum wage.
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  • Charting the radio top 40

    June 2, 2010  |  Infographics

    BBC Radio 1 takes a shot at displaying the top 40 chart visually in The Love 40. It's actually a lot better than I thought it was going to be.

    A grid view of bubbles arranges singles (or albums) such that you have each column as a day, and each row as a rank. So for example, the top right bubble, is the most recent number one single, which at the time of writing this, is Nothin' on You by B.o.B, featuring Bruno Mars. Roll over any song (i.e. bubble) and a connecting path shows how the song has risen or fallen in the past few weeks.
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  • How our laws are made

    June 1, 2010  |  Infographics

    It takes a lot of work for a bill to become a law. It's a complex process that most of us know nothing about, other than the tidbits that linger in our memory from high school government class. Mike Wirth clarifies the process in his gameboard-like submission to Sunlight Labs' competition, Design for America. Mike's entry won top honors in the "How A Bill Becomes a Law" category.

  • Pulp Fiction timeline

    May 31, 2010  |  Infographics

    In case you were confused by the Pulp Fiction storyline, dehahs has plotted it out for you. Inspired by Randall Munroe's character timeline, each line represents a character and intersections show interactions. The story board rests in the background. Like any good Quentin Tarantino flick, everyone dies more or less. Bang, bang. Boom, boom.

    [via]

  • Facebook privacy options untangled

    May 17, 2010  |  Infographics

    People are up in arms about Facebook's new privacy policies, partly because some information was forced into public view and partly because there are so many settings that figuring out what's public and what's private is confusing. Guilbert Gates of the New York Times clears things up with the above graphic. To put it simply: there's a lot of stuff.
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  • Field guide to fanboys

    May 13, 2010  |  Infographics

    Fanboy field guide

    PCWorld provides a handy field guide to help you spot fanboys in the wild. Come in contact with someone who is strangely turned on by brushed metal, goes rampant on the mention of AT&T, calls everything magical, fears beach volleyballs, and has Coldplay on constant repeat? You've got an Apple fanboy on your hands. You've been warned.

    [via Cool Infographics]

  • The path to successful infographics

    May 11, 2010  |  Design, Infographics

    Most people don't know what actually goes into a good infographic. There's a lot more to it than just the design. There's research, analysis, and fact-checking that you have to do long before you open Illustrator. Sarah Slobin, from the Wall Street Journal, explains how to create successful infographics. Have an idea, get the data, choose your tools, edit wisely, and above all else, pay close attention to detail.

  • Nutritional facts redesigned

    May 10, 2010  |  Infographics

    Nutrition facts labels are uniform across products, but let's imagine for a second that you could do whatever you want, just as long they showed certain bits of information. FFunction takes a stab at redesigning the standard milk carton under this premise. No cows, no fields of green, and no dairies. Just nutritional facts and full transparency on what's going into your body.

    This wouldn't work with a mass market, but hey, they've got my purchase. After all, data does a body good.

    [Thanks, Audree]

  • Evolution of Facebook privacy policies

    May 7, 2010  |  Infographics

    There's been a lot of hullabaloo about Facebook's newly installed privacy policies. It started out very closed, to just university students, and has expanded its reach, especially over the past year, to the more public Web. Matt McKeon, of the Visual Communication Lab, explores Facebook's privacy policies, from 2005 to present.

    Rings represent the audience, starting with you in the middle all the way out to the entire Internet. Slices represent bits and interactions you have on Facebook. Click on the image to see how the policies changed over the years for each bit.

    Finally, you can also download the code (in the implementation section), which was written in Processing.js. I think I'm noticing a trend. Check it out here.

    [via Ben Fry]

  • Tracking the oil spill

    May 7, 2010  |  Infographics, Mapping

    For those following the status of the oil spill, the New York Times provides a map tracking the spread. Press play to get the day-by-day. The oil is currently spreading to the west of the Mississippi delta, getting dangerously close to the oyster beds (in red).
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  • The Boom of Big Infographics

    May 6, 2010  |  Infographics

    Big information graphics have been around for a long time. They've come in the form of maps, visualization, art, signs, etc. That was all on paper though. In the past couple of years, humongous, gigantic, and often really long infographics have found their way onto the computer screen, through blogs and news sites. Some are great. Some really suck. The volume is booming for both.

    Let's take a look at when this all got started, where the trend is headed, and how much we should really read into these things.
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  • How men and women label colors

    May 4, 2010  |  Infographics, Statistics

    Along the same lines of Dolores Labs' color experiment, Randall Munroe of xkcd reveals the results of his color survey. He took a slightly different approach though. Here are some of the basic findings:

    If you ask people to name colors long enough, they go totally crazy.

    “Puke” and “vomit” are totally real colors.

    Colorblind people are more likely than non-colorblind people to type “fuck this” (or some variant) and quit in frustration.

    Indigo was totally just added to the rainbow so it would have 7 colors and make that “ROY G. BIV” acronym work, just like you always suspected. It should really be ROY GBP, with maybe a C or T thrown in there between G and B depending on how the spectrum was converted to RGB.

    A couple dozen people embedded SQL ‘drop table’ statements in the color names. Nice try, kids.

    Nobody can spell “fuchsia”.

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  • Trustworthiness of beards

    April 23, 2010  |  Infographics

    Matt McInerney of pixelspread describes the trustworthiness of the people behind their facial hair. You better be careful when I'm around. I'm questionable, border-line unsavory. Don't worry though. I'm not a werewolf - and I don't have the ability to grow a Hitler. How trustworthy are you?
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  • Local neighborhood infographics

    April 21, 2010  |  Infographics

    Good Mag put on an infographic contest not too long ago that asked people to design around the idea of neighborhood. Any neighborhood would do, just as long the focus was on local. As you might expect, most of the entries were more design than data, but hey, that doesn't mean they're not worth looking at.
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  • A flowchart to decide what typeface to use

    April 21, 2010  |  Infographics

    A typeface can make or break your graphic. Use Comic Sans, and no one will take you seriously ever again. Luckily, graphic designer Julian Hansen put together this flowchart for a school project to help you figure out what typeface to use. Most of you will probably be interested in the infographic branch.
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  • Cartographies of Time: A History of the Timeline

    April 19, 2010  |  Infographics

    I don't often give in to impulse buys, but I just ordered Cartographies of Time, and I'm pretty sure it's going to be well worth the thirty bucks.
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  • The making of wine – in motion graphics

    April 9, 2010  |  Infographics

    Designer Tiago Cabaco explains the conception of wine in this short animated infographic. Some of the effects, like the frame rotation, are a little overused. It actually made me a little dizzy, but it's short. Still fun to watch.
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  • 100 Pixar characters drawn to scale

    April 8, 2010  |  Infographics

    Designer Juan Pablo Bravo illustrates 100 Pixar characters to scale, from Wally B. and Luxo Jr. to Wall E. and Lotso, from the upcoming Toy Story 3. Main characters are highlighted in yellow. Catch the full giganto version of the graphic on Flickr.
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