• Time running parallel

    February 1, 2013  |  Data Art

    In Waters Re~ artist Xárene Eskandar placed video of the same landscape at different times of day in parallel.

    They capture the subjective and perceptual qualities of time expressed as events, moments, memory and landscape. The goal is to break the linear experience of time, allowing viewers to perceive multiple times within a single viewpoint. As a result insignificant moments become significant events, heightening one's experience of the landscape and one's existence in that particular moment in time and space.

    The results are beautiful. [via FastCo]

  • Evolution of science fiction covers in color

    January 24, 2013  |  Data Art

    Arthur Buxton plotted the most common colors of Penguin Publishing science fiction colors and arranged them over time. Also available in print.

    Changing science fiction colors

    I wonder if there's a good way to show connections between the titles or the different covers for each title.

  • Slitscanning online videos

    January 21, 2013  |  Data Art

    slitscanner

    Thanks to Sha Hwang, you can now siltscan videos on YouTube and Vimeo with an easy-to-use bookmarklet. Just go to the video and click. In case you're unfamiliar with the technique, here's a description from Golan Levin:

    Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time-based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit-shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

    Be sure to switch over to HTML5 on YouTube or Vimeo first. The bookmarklet won't work with Flash.

  • silenc: Removing the silent letters from a body of text

    January 18, 2013  |  Data Art

    During a two-week visualization course, Momo Miyazaki, Manas Karambelkar, and Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen imagined what a body of text would be without the the silent letters in silenc.

    silenc is based on the concept of the find-and-replace command. This function is applied to a body of text using a database of rules. The silenc database is constructed from hundreds of rules and exceptions composed from known guidelines for "un"pronunciation. Processing code marks up the silent letters and GREP commands format the text.

    So nothing too fancy on the analysis side, but the experimental views are kinda interesting to see. [via @alexislloyd]

  • Random walk on pi

    January 9, 2013  |  Data Art

    Steps through pi

    By Francisco Javier Aragón Artacho, "This is a walk made out of the first 100 billion digits of pi in base 4 with the following rules for the steps: 0 right, 1 up, 2 left, 3 down." [via]

  • The family tree for All in the Family

    December 6, 2012  |  Data Art

    All in the Family Tree

    James Grady from Fathom Information Design had a look at the family tree of All in the Family, a popular television from the 1970s:

    All in the Family was the origin of seven spin-off shows that aired between the early '70s and the mid-'90s: Maude, Good Times, The Jeffersons, Checking In, Archie Bunker's Place, Gloria, and 704 Hauser.

    In tribute to nostalgia, the end of fall and its beautiful colors, and my fascination with retro TV shows, I've created All in the Family Tree, an interactive visualization of all the characters from each of the eight shows listed above. Each character is represented by a leaf and each show is indicated by a separate color. A branch line connects a character's crossover from original show to spin-off and vice versa.

    It's a charming piece that's sure to bring back good memories for anyone who watched the shows. I was too young to appreciate them at the time, and all I can remember is the opening sequence of The Jeffersons. I think they were moving on up. To the east side.

  • Lunar Lander trails

    December 4, 2012  |  Data Art

    In 1979, Atari released Lunar Lander, a game whose object was to land a module safely on the moon. Digital artist Seb Lee-Delisle turned the game into an installation in which you play the game, and your paths are drawn on a wall by a hanging robot. The result, a unique trace of players' paths in the game, is quite nice.

    I'm surprised we haven't seen more video game-based pieces likes this. The only one that comes to mind is the Just Cause 2 point cloud, which showed 11 million player deaths. It revealed terrain and gameplay mechanics. There's also this graphic that shows what buttons to push to beat Super Mario Brothers 3, but that doesn't really count. It'd be fun to see the direct path of a Mario expert versus a novice path that doubles back and ends early. Pac-Man might be a fun one to see, too. Yeah, let's do that.

  • Pinball machine as Etch A Sketch

    November 29, 2012  |  Data Art

    Pinball machine as sketcher

    When you plan pinball, the ball bounces around creating paths for itself and the better you play, the more control you have over those paths. Recent design graduate Sam van Doorn modified a machine so that you can see those paths in his project STYN. A poster is placed underneath the flippers, and the ball gets a douse of paint on the way out, so you get a unique sketch each time you play. [via infosthetics]

  • Lego New York

    November 16, 2012  |  Data Art

    Lego New York

    I'm not sure what these digitally rendered Lego blocks by JR Schmidt represent, other than the geography of New York, but the image sure is pretty. This may or may not also have to do with me loving everything Lego.

  • Data visualization as cultural phenomenon

    November 8, 2012  |  Data Art

    In 1979, Joy Division released their album Unknown Pleasures, and the cover was an image of readings from a pulsar. That image grew into a cultural phenomenon. With the kick off of the new Visualized conference in New York, this short video explores the growth of the icon. [Thanks, Eric]

  • Beauty in movement

    November 1, 2012  |  Data Art

    For the Made by Humans exhibit at the Hyundai Vision Hall in South Korea, Universal Everything turns basic movements into a visual spectacle. Pretty. From the Creators Project:

    As the founder and creative director of Universal Everything, Matt Pyke leads a creative mission to create gorgeous visual spectacles on screen that, while they will never be attained in physical reality, reinterpret the nuances of natural human motion.

    His effectiveness with capturing movements and transforming them into sweeping animated forms allows him to show us shapes we have never seen before while preserving the individual human element in all his creations.

    [via Fast Company]

  • ReConstitution recreates debates through transcripts and language processing

    October 17, 2012  |  Data Art

    ReConstitution

    ReConstitution 2012, a fun experiment by Sosolimited, processes transcripts from the presidential debates, and recreates them with animated words and charts.

    Part data visualization, part experimental typography, ReConstitution 2012 is a live web app linked to the US Presidential Debates. During and after the three debates, language used by the candidates generates a live graphical map of the events. Algorithms track the psychological states of Romney and Obama and compare them to past candidates. The app allows the user to get beyond the punditry and discover the hidden meaning in the words chosen by the candidates.

    As you let the transcript run, numbers followed by their units (like "18 months") flash on the screen, and trigger words for emotions like positivity, negativity, and rage are highlighted yellow, blue, and red, respectively. You can also see the classifications in graph form.

    There are a handful of less straightforward text classifications for truthy and suicidal, which are based on linguistic studies, which in turn are based on word frequencies. These estimates are more fuzzy. So, as the creators suggest, it's best not to interpret the project as an analytical tool, and more of a fun way to look back at the debate, which it is. It's pretty fun to watch.

    Here's a short video from Sosolimited for more on how the application works:

  • Data sculpture shows emotional response to Olympics

    September 20, 2012  |  Data Art

    plates

    During the Olympics, Studio NAND, Moritz Stefaner, and Drew Hemment tracked Twitter sentiment with Emoto. This interactive installation and data sculpture is the last leg of the project.

    The emoto data sculp­ture repres­ents message volumes, aggreg­ated per hour and senti­ment level in hori­zontal bands which move up and down according to the current number of Tweets at each time. This resulted in simpli­fied 3-dimensional surfaces which allows visitors to identify patterns in message frequency distri­bu­tion more easily. And while not being specific­ally designed in this direc­tion, the surfaces also nicely support haptic exploration.

    The sculpture itself is black and unchanging, and it's used as a projection surface to display a heat map and overlay text. The projection is controlled by the user, which makes for an interesting blend of physical and digital.

  • Make cool images with emergent algorithm

    September 17, 2012  |  Data Art

    Ablaze

    I'm not sure what I'd do with Ablaze.js, a JavaScript library by Patrick Gunderson, but the results are sexy. Play around with the app here. [via @jeffclark]

  • RGB Colorspace Atlas shows every shade in a cubic book

    September 7, 2012  |  Data Art

    RGB Colorspace Atlas

    The 8-inch cube RGB Colorspace Atlas by artist Tauba Auerbach shows every color in said colorspace. Cubic rainbow. What does it mean? [Colossal via @periscopic]

  • Long-exposure fireworks photos

    August 29, 2012  |  Data Art

    Long-exposure fireworks

    Photographer David Johnson took long-exposure shots of fireworks. Fireworks already leave trails when they go off, the long-exposure versions create a spiky ball effect. Pretty. [via]

  • Water Light Graffiti

    August 22, 2012  |  Data Art

    Water Light Graffiti is an installation by Antonin Fourneau that lets you use water and light as your painting medium.

    The "Water Light Graffiti" is a surface made of thousands of LED illuminated by the contact of water. You can use a paintbrush, a water atomizer, your fingers or anything damp to sketch a brightness message or just to draw. Water Light Graffiti is a wall for ephemeral messages in the urban space without deterioration. A wall to communicate and share magically in the city.

    Pretty awesome how the wall illuminates when a couple of buckets of water are thrown at it.

    [via Co.Design]

  • Disney Research makes plants interactive

    August 15, 2012  |  Data Art

    Botanicus Interacticus from Disney Research turns plants into multi-touch surfaces, simply by placing an electrode in the soil.

    Botanicus Interacticus has a number of unique properties. This instrumentation of living plants is simple, non-invasive, and does not damage the plants: it requires only a single wire placed anywhere in the plant soil. Botanicus Interacticus allows for rich and expressive interaction with plants. It allows to use such gestures as sliding fingers on the stem of the orchid, detecting touch and grasp location, tracking proximity between human and a plant, and estimating the amount of touch contact, among others.

    And then botany education changed forever.

    [via Boing Boing]

  • Paintings as pie charts

    August 10, 2012  |  Data Art

    Ten years, ten artists

    Expanding on his Vincent van Gogh pie charts, Arthur Buxton minimalized famous paintings from ten artists into more of everyone's favorite chart type. The color distribution of each pie represents the five most used shades in each painting. Like the first time around, you're either loving this or foaming at the mouth.

  • Celebrating the joy of metering

    August 8, 2012  |  Data Art

    Compass Brooch

    Meters, by Berlin-based designers Patrick Kochlik and Monika Hoinkis, celebrates the joy of measuring for the sake of measuring. The pieces include a compass brooch and a bubble level that you wear as a watch, which is nice because everyone likes to know where they're going while walking a level surface.

    [via infosthetics]

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